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Single sided rear pannier rack

sheffsimonsheffsimon Posts: 1,282
edited October 2011 in Tour & expedition
Can anybody recommend a rear pannier rack that attaches to only one side (non-drive side for preference), and that carries just one pannier?

Posts

  • I bet you don't find one - probably because it'd be unstable as you'd only have two fixing points.

    My suggestion is just get a cheap second-hand rack and butcher it with a hacksaw - then see how it works on the bike.

    There are racks made for bikes with disc brakes, if that's your problem - like this Topeak one...

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/topeak-dual-sid ... eam-racks/

    The other oprtion is to go for a rack that fixes to the seat post only, like this one...

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/topeak-qr-beam-rack-ex-mtx/

    or this...

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/topeak-qr-beam-rack-rx-carbon/
    It's an uphill climb to the bottom
  • andymillerandymiller Posts: 2,856
    I'm puzzled: is there a reason why you can only attach the pannier rack to one side?
    There are racks made for bikes with disc brakes, if that's your problem - like this Topeak one...

    I don't think that's the problem - see the bit about wanting to attach it to the non-drive side.

    Anyway let's see if the OP gives some background.
  • sheffsimonsheffsimon Posts: 1,282
    andymiller wrote:
    I'm puzzled: is there a reason why you can only attach the pannier rack to one side?
    There are racks made for bikes with disc brakes, if that's your problem - like this Topeak one...

    I don't think that's the problem - see the bit about wanting to attach it to the non-drive side.

    Anyway let's see if the OP gives some background.

    Just after something I can fit quickly, couple of fixings on one side, in order to occassionally carry laptop/shirts/etc to and from work.

    Not disc brakes, just calipers.

    My commuter bike is also my winter bike and I didnt particularly want the rack on full time.

    Sure I've seen other commuters with one pannier - maybe not one sided rack though.
  • apreadingapreading Posts: 4,532
    Dont see why you cant leave it on there - I do and if the bag is not on you wouldnt even know it was there. Besides, you should get a rack that you can mount a light on for commuting and that means you need to keep chaning your lighting if you keep putting it on and off.

    If I didnt want to take it off it would take all of 2 minutes - 4 screws and done.

    I almost always ride with a single pannier too - no problem with that.
  • You could go for a saddlebag instead. Carradice offer a few different quick release attachments.... I prefer their SQR one:

    http://www.carradice.co.uk/index.php?pa ... gory_id=41
    It's an uphill climb to the bottom
  • andymillerandymiller Posts: 2,856
    Best uption is to buy a normal rack. If you think about it, you need both legs for strength - trying to design a one-sided rack would be as difficult as designing a two-legged table. The extra two bolts will take you maybe a couple of minutes each to fix. Lots of people use one pannier with a normal rack for commuting.

    If you don't mind paying a bit more, the Tubus Vega is pretty minimalist.

    You could get a seatpost cantilever rack but they are quite expensive and have some real disadvantages compared to a normal rack.
  • ride_wheneverride_whenever Posts: 13,279
    The tortec velocity is probably what you've seen. It's a double sided rack but doesn't have the flat bit on the top and is only about an inch across at the top. Pretty cheap but a lovely piece of kit.

    1241537719109-1dxhq1ijyrftw-399-75.jpg
  • sheffsimonsheffsimon Posts: 1,282
    Thanks one and all for your comments.

    Sounds like a normal rack with one pannier is best option.

    Dont think laptop etc would fit in a saddlebag, not securely anyway.
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