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Which GPS for mapping new routes in Colombian jungle?

edwardmeikleedwardmeikle Posts: 4
edited September 2011 in MTB buying advice
Hi there,

I seriously need some advice on GPS units as i am not familier with them at all. In fact i have never used one....ever. Please help me. Huge thanks in advance to those that can :D

I am about to meet my good friend in Colombia who wants to map routes in the Sierra Nevada mountains. As this area has been under paramilitary rule for the last 40 years there are no OS maps or any other types of maps of the area at all.

He knows all the trails but wants to be able to put a trail line on a computer screen to show clients at the new tour company he's just opened where they will be going and what elevation gains and losses they'll get. Apparantly he's got one single track descent from 3,100m to the carribbean sea!! I cannot wait to get out there and start helping him out with this mapping project.

I just hope i show up with the correct type of GPS unit.

I guess a cheap, durable, water resistant, mapping unit is what he needs.

Wadayareckon I should get?

Posts

  • paulboxpaulbox Posts: 1,203
    For value for money, I'd check out the Garmin Forerunner units on Amazon.
    XC: Giant Anthem X
    Fun: Yeti SB66
    Road: Litespeed C1, Cannondale Supersix Evo, Cervelo R5
    Trainer: Bianchi via Nirone
    Hack: GT hardtail with Schwalbe City Jets
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,748
    Is GPS service even available over Colombia? Find that out first, although with the DEA having a lot of activity there I would expect them to have put some Sat's up.

    Simon
  • Forerunners are good for running (i have one) but i wouldnt choose one for this application.
    Something like a Garmin Oregon would be useful. These have a large screen which can display a map (e.g. OS map), but you would have to check with Garmin to see if a map is available (you buy them seperately to the unit).
    If no maps are available of the area but your friend knows where he is going he could swich the GPSr on and walk the trails with it strapped to his backpack. The GPSr will record where he has been walking (like a breadcrumb trail). He can the download this to a computer and overlay it on google earth for instance. Then he would have a rough idea of the direction of the trails. The GPSr can also supply information on elevation, distance travelled etc etc.
  • paulboxpaulbox Posts: 1,203
    shoddy wrote:
    Forerunners are good for running (i have one) but i wouldnt choose one for this application.
    Something like a Garmin Oregon would be useful. These have a large screen which can display a map (e.g. OS map), but you would have to check with Garmin to see if a map is available (you buy them seperately to the unit).
    If no maps are available of the area but your friend knows where he is going he could swich the GPSr on and walk the trails with it strapped to his backpack. The GPSr will record where he has been walking (like a breadcrumb trail). He can the download this to a computer and overlay it on google earth for instance. Then he would have a rough idea of the direction of the trails. The GPSr can also supply information on elevation, distance travelled etc etc.
    Just a few points from the Op...

    "There are no maps available"
    "His friend knows all the trails"

    He wants something that will track where they have been... :roll:
    XC: Giant Anthem X
    Fun: Yeti SB66
    Road: Litespeed C1, Cannondale Supersix Evo, Cervelo R5
    Trainer: Bianchi via Nirone
    Hack: GT hardtail with Schwalbe City Jets
  • bartimaeusbartimaeus Posts: 1,812
    If all you want is a GPS logger then an iGotU is an option... switch it on, stick it on/in your pack and then download at the end of your trip. I have a GT-120 which cost me £38. For multi-day trekking you might want something with more capacity - like a GT-600 which is about £55. Much cheaper than a full function GPS unit.

    I'm not entirely convinced by the elevation accuracy of mine - I usually get my profile data by downloading the GPX to WheresThePath, but you'll need the GPS to be accurate if there are no decent maps. I suspect that this may be a common issue as I've seen similar inaccuracy in other GPS plots.

    You may want to test out different units for 'jungle' use - the tree cover may prevent the GPS getting a good fix. My unit seems to be OK in the woods as long as you acquire the satellites first... but West Sussex is a bit different to Colombia.

    I'd go into a shop and get them to demo some GPS units!
    Vitus Sentier VR+ (2018) GT Grade AL 105 (2016)
    Giant Anthem X4 (2010) GT Avalanche 1.0 (2010)
    Kingley Vale and QECP Trail Collective - QECP Trail Building
  • PaulBox wrote:
    shoddy wrote:
    Forerunners are good for running (i have one) but i wouldnt choose one for this application.
    Something like a Garmin Oregon would be useful. These have a large screen which can display a map (e.g. OS map), but you would have to check with Garmin to see if a map is available (you buy them seperately to the unit).
    If no maps are available of the area but your friend knows where he is going he could swich the GPSr on and walk the trails with it strapped to his backpack. The GPSr will record where he has been walking (like a breadcrumb trail). He can the download this to a computer and overlay it on google earth for instance. Then he would have a rough idea of the direction of the trails. The GPSr can also supply information on elevation, distance travelled etc etc.
    Just a few points from the Op...

    "There are no maps available"
    "His friend knows all the trails"

    He wants something that will track where they have been... :roll:

    sorry i probally wasnt clear. His mate can walk the trails he knows with a GPSr (such as Garmin Oregon) and then use the tracklog function to create his own maps to show potential customers.
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