Forum home Commuter cycling forum Commuting chat

Water inside a frame

medoramasmedoramas Posts: 202
edited September 2011 in Commuting chat
Good morning Commuters!

Do you do some sort of frame sealing before the winter?

I was replacing a bottom bracket on my cromoly bike last weekend. It was after a heavy rain commute. When I started unscrewing it after few seconds I found big area of my kitchen floor was covered in water that was pouring out from the frame... I didn't use mudguards that day, plenty of holes around the frame to let water gets in. But not even one to let it go out... :-/

I'm going to drill 4mm hole on the bottom of the frame to not get any H2O staying there.

Is there any point in sealing the frame actually? Or is that bloody water too smart for such a tricks and it will find its way into the frame anyway?

Posts

  • Water will always find its way. Could be worth buying a tin of Waxoyl to treat the inside of the frame, Toolstation sell a cheap version called "Protection Wax" which adorns the inside of my equilibrium.
  • After a good, wet ride (steady) try lifting the front wheel until the bike is perpendicular. I get water coming out the 'weld - gas' holes.

    +1 Undercover Elephant - Next time it's stripped down to the frame :-)
    FCN16 - 1970 BSA Wayfarer

    FCN4 - Fixie Inc
  • If this is a problem, especially with steel frames, wouldn't a decent bike maker treat frames to prevent corrosion before assembly? Or are they hoping for frames to corrode and for us to buy replacements?

    Is it a good idea to spray WD40 or oil into a steel frame, say when you have the seat post removed, or is it only proper protection wax that helps?
    Nobody told me we had a communication problem
  • gilesjukgilesjuk Posts: 340
    edited August 2011
    When I bought my Singular frames they were rust proofed, head tube prepared and everything.

    WD40 won't help in a frame. You need a coating that is thick and will last. J P Weigle framesaver for instance.
  • mudcow007mudcow007 Posts: 3,861
    i remember when the disused railway flooded by my parents house, the water was that deep it went over then handlebars of my Kona Stinky. it seemed a good idea to ride through the 4ft deep water at the time i started to get a bit worried though when bubbles where coming from my front suspension an rear shock


    it didnt seem to have any lasting damage, it was aluminium though
    Keeping it classy since '83
  • SimonAHSimonAH Posts: 3,730
    Waxoil is brilliant stuff as this is what it's designed to do - tool for the job. However any water dispersant will be better than none.

    Do the frame makers care? Of course not. Given the thickness of the tubing even a steel frame ridded year round on the Aberdeen sea front will take years to rust through. Having said that though, long before it rusts through it will be much weakened which is not good for some of the power thighs who post on here!

    I waxoil frames as a matter of course, and apply high tech silicon car polish to the outside at new as well. Makes the bike easy to clean and harder to scratch.

    ....Thought.....little squirts of builders foam inside the frame? That would plug it completely and add no measureable weight....
    FCN 5 belt driven fixie for city bits
    CAADX 105 beastie for bumpy bits
    Litespeed L3 for Strava bits

    Smoke me a kipper, I'll be back for breakfast.
  • meanredspidermeanredspider Posts: 12,337
    As a restorer of old Alfa Romeos as a hobby, a trick is to mix Waxoyl with cheap engine oil. Helps the Waxoyl flow to those places where it wouldn't normally. The Waxoyl then holds the oil in place. 10 years later and the Alfa panels are still rust-free.
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
  • davisdavis Posts: 2,505
    As a restorer of old Alfa Romeos as a hobby, a trick is to mix Waxoyl with cheap engine oil. Helps the Waxoyl flow to those places where it wouldn't normally. The Waxoyl then holds the oil in place. 10 years later and the Alfa panels are still rust-free.

    Genius. Noted, thanks!
    Sometimes parts break. Sometimes you crash. Sometimes it’s your fault.
  • As a restorer of old Alfa Romeos as a hobby, a trick is to mix Waxoyl with cheap engine oil. Helps the Waxoyl flow to those places where it wouldn't normally. The Waxoyl then holds the oil in place. 10 years later and the Alfa panels are still rust-free.

    That is truly astounding. :P

    http://www.toolstation.com/shop/Automot ... 795/p41925

    Seriously, for the sake of £3.20, it's worth it. I used it on the Equilibrium, and pretty soon it had blocked all the little holes the water could get in. Needn't wait until it's stripped to the frame, either. If the bottom bracket is out, take out the seat pin and the bottle cage bolts and squirt it in every hole you can. Erm... can I rephrase that?
  • meanredspidermeanredspider Posts: 12,337
    On a slightly different tack, my brother stored his carbon OCLV Trek MTB outside under cover (in Vancouver). I don't know the details but basically the moisture inside the frame killed it. I can get the details if this doesn't stack up to anybody but I'm wondering if anybody is aware of this issue.
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 50,675 Lives Here
    strange how there are millions of steel bikes out there more than 20 years old that are just fine with no treatment.

    Dont block the holes up as then there is no way to let6 any water evaporate out.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • nicklouse wrote:
    strange how there are millions of steel bikes out there more than 20 years old that are just fine with no treatment.

    Dont block the holes up as then there is no way to let6 any water evaporate out.

    Perhaps 20 years ago all the LBS's knew to oil the inside of a frame?

    The little holes on a steel frame don't let water out, they let air out if you're welding at high temperatures. Top-end frame builders don't have them on their bikes, as they work at lower temps.
  • I drilled a 5 mm hole in the bottom of the BB shell on mine to stop filling up.

    The frame was made in 1986.
    Racing is rubbish you can\'t relax and enjoy it- because some censored is always trying to get past.
  • mudcow007mudcow007 Posts: 3,861
    ive got a 1950's steel frame, does this mean it will be likely made out of cheese because of the rust inside?

    poking around down the seat tube doesnt feel oily or smell like waxoyl
    Keeping it classy since '83
Sign In or Register to comment.