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Standover clearance is it enough?

jameisterjameister Posts: 28
edited August 2011 in MTB general
Just purchased a lovely new Giant Anthem X4, although the standover clearance is just about 1inch maybe less, is this normal? When I was in the shop the guy said that it was the correct size (this was sitting on the bike while he was hold the front wheel), I didn't actually ride it though. :?

Checking the standover clearance topic in this forum of other riders it seems that the average is about 2inch. Any thought s on this?

Posts

  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    again. standover clearance is a thing of the past.

    it is common for some people to have no clearance on a bike with suspension. the ones that have clearance tend to be the taller people.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    Not really relevant on a FS. More important is length and if it is the right size for you.
    How does it feel to ride?
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • OK, but with regards to the seat post it seems I cannot lower it enough to get the correct riding position i.e. the legs and feet are not touching the pedals when at the lowest, surely this is a sign of the incorrect size or can the seat post be chopped down?
  • stubsstubs Posts: 5,001
    What size is the bike and how tall are you. The seatpost on an Anthem as supplied is too long to drop all the way down because of the kink in the seattube where the top rocker pivots are.
    Fig rolls: proof that god loves cyclists and that she wants us to do another lap
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    jameister wrote:
    OK, but with regards to the seat post it seems I cannot lower it enough to get the correct riding position i.e. the legs and feet are not touching the pedals when at the lowest, surely this is a sign of the incorrect size or can the seat post be chopped down?

    well in that case it is way to big.


    what size is the bike? how tall are you? Yes you can cut the seat post down.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • well in that case it is way to big.


    what size is the bike? how tall are you? Yes you can cut the seat post down.

    It's a "M' 18". I'm 5'8". The bike shop said this is the correct size and just see how it feels when you ride it. If it still doesn't feel ok, then I can take it back and thy're change it.

    The seat post will definitely need an inch or 2 trimmed then.
  • stubsstubs Posts: 5,001
    My mate has an Anthem X4 medium and he is 5' 9". He has about 3 inches of post showing but I had to cut 3 inches off the post to let him drop it for downhills.
    Fig rolls: proof that god loves cyclists and that she wants us to do another lap
  • My mate has an Anthem X4 medium and he is 5' 9". He has about 3 inches of post showing but I had to cut 3 inches off the post to let him drop it for downhills.

    Exactly, had to do the same for my Gary Fisher.
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    Personally if I was choosing between slightly big and slightly small I'd go for slightly small.
    INHO if you can't reach the pedals with a standard seatpost the bike is too big.
    How does it feel for reach?
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • Personally if I was choosing between slightly big and slightly small I'd go for slightly small.
    INHO if you can't reach the pedals with a standard seatpost the bike is too big.
    How does it feel for reach?

    Reach felt OK. I mean it was a bit difficult to tell with the seat post not being able to get lowered enough though. I can get my feet on the pedals to the lowest point, but the legs were fully stretched without being slightly bent and there was no way the seat post could lower anymore without being cut down.

    Speaking to the shop they said that my height and size should be correct for the size bike and it would be normal to trim the seat post slightly as long as it's not having to be trimmed an excessive amount. And if I'm still not happy to take the bike back and they're change it. I guess I'm not gonna know until I get on it and ride it. Although I was leaning to what your saying with going for a slightly small rather the slightly big. I
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    If the shop are saying that based on 'recommended sizes' they are idiots. Should fit is not the same as does fit.
    From experience my previous bike was a little bit too big, and felt really hairy on steep rolls etc.
    My new one is probably marginally small, but less scary, so I have more confidence and more fun.
    Obviously the right size is ideal.

    Problem seems to be that you will not be able to try it out properly without cutting the seatpost, which could cause a problem if you do decide to swap it.

    I would go back to the shop and ride both sizes at least around the carpark, and then decide.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    Or as my old dad used to say, "don't worry you'll grow into it."
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • Problem seems to be that you will not be able to try it out properly without cutting the seatpost, which could cause a problem if you do decide to swap it.

    I'll just chuck on my seat post from my old bike, try that.

    My old bike I'm sure was a small, but I can't remember, could quite happily plant my feet on the ground when lowing the seat post for downhill runs.
  • My new one is probably marginally small, but less scary, so I have more confidence and more fun.
    Obviously the right size is ideal.

    Agreed, thinking small would give me more confidence, stability.
  • stubsstubs Posts: 5,001
    Did you sit on the smaller bike at the shop the Anthem is quite a long frame and it might work with a layback post.
    Fig rolls: proof that god loves cyclists and that she wants us to do another lap
  • stubs wrote:
    Did you sit on the smaller bike at the shop the Anthem is quite a long frame and it might work with a layback post.

    No only the medium so had nothing to compare. I did try a small about 8 months ago but couldn't remember how that felt when I was trying the medium in the shop. When I sat on the bike the shop owner said a medium was definitely my size 100%. But I never planted my feet on the ground or attempted to lower the seat post etc,

    What is a layback post?
  • Take the bike back, get a refund and go to a shop that will give you a correctly sized bike. :evil:
    If they cannot set the bike up in the shop to meet your needs then I would question the quality of service/staff :idea:
    No proper shop should have let you leave the premises without being sure that the bike was properly fitted to your needs. Those days should be long gone by now :!:
  • Take the bike back, get a refund and go to a shop that will give you a correctly sized bike. :evil:
    If they cannot set the bike up in the shop to meet your needs then I would question the quality of service/staff :idea:
    No proper shop should have let you leave the premises without being sure that the bike was properly fitted to your needs. Those days should be long gone by now :!:

    I hear what your saying but they weren't that bad. It's a very respectable bike shop and the owner has been in the business for years. I may of given him the impression that I knew what I was talking about a bit more than I actually did which could of put him on the back foot. But in any case the bike can be returned if I'm not happy and yes I can get a refund or even exchange the bike, they are very helpful.
  • Si1988Si1988 Posts: 158
    Just to clarify, is the issue that the frame is too big, or the seatpost is too long to drop enough so you can ride comfortably? If the latter, see if the shop will lend you a shorter post so you can run it lower. If you're a young'un and still have some growing in you, and can get away with a shorter post dropped tot he frame then I'd be inclined to keep it. I may have the wrong end of the stick though.
  • Si1988 wrote:
    Just to clarify, is the issue that the frame is too big, or the seatpost is too long to drop enough so you can ride comfortably? If the latter, see if the shop will lend you a shorter post so you can run it lower. If you're a young'un and still have some growing in you, and can get away with a shorter post dropped tot he frame then I'd be inclined to keep it. I may have the wrong end of the stick though.

    It's a bit of everything to be honest and am totally confused. Have had a lot of mixed opinions, some say the small others say the medium. The stand over clearance is none and the seat post doesn't go down enough for me to get a decent riding position. From what I gather it's personal preference to your riding style. Would be interested to know if anyone out there owns an Anthem and what size they have relative to their height. :wink:
  • Dan_xzDan_xz Posts: 130
    Two people the same height don't automatically need the same size bike, as their proportions could be different. Eg long leg/short body vs short legs/long body.

    You need to find out if the top tube length is right for you, and you can only do that with the seat in the right position.

    Really you should have ridden the bike at least up and down the street before buying it, but also the shop should have sorted out the riding position before you took it. If the post needs cutting down then take take it back and let the shop do it or swap for a shorter one, as they should have done in the first place.

    Bottom line is they sold you a bike on their advice which you can't even pedal. Take it back and ask them to set it up for you if they are so sure it's your size.
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    jameister
    back to the shop and get a bike that fits. IF it is just a seat post reduction in length then that should have been done by the shop on collection/fitting.

    again Standover is not an issue but bike fit is.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
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