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A Winter Bike - What's that all about?

markdavidhillmarkdavidhill Posts: 279
edited August 2011 in The bottom bracket
So you spend thousands on your 'best' bike. It is honed, tuned and fitted beautifully. It is amazing to ride and it comes back into the centrally heated house at the end of a good 100km.

So why not use it all year?

Mine is the Lynskey Sportive and the 'other' is a Secteur. The Secteur is superb value for the discounted £520 I paid for it as my starter road bike, but it pales into insignificance by comparison to the Lynskey and I DON'T WANT TO RIDE IT. But should I keep it as a 'winter bike'. Whatever that means.

Is it not better to ride your best all the time a reap year round benefits from your investment. If bits wear out, replace them.

Is that not a good idea?

Your educated and experienced thoughts please.
Team Madison Genesis Volare & Condor Super Acciaio
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Posts

  • SecteurSecteur Posts: 1,971
    I reckon relatively cheaper bikes (105, light weight alu with carbon forks) are better as they are cheaper to replace bits when they wear out and you can "throw then around" a bit more.

    I'd love a £3k bike, and could afford to buy one, but I wont because 1) i'd be too scared to use it 2) i'd break it.

    Obviously, if I was racing, then i'd invest...
  • Can you fit mudguards on your best bike?
    Do you always have the time & energy to wash the salt & muck off it as soon as you get home?
    You're more likely to hit the deck during winter too, so the chances of damaging your bike are higher. Mind you, if you've got 3 grand to spend on a bike, you're probably not bothered about that!
    Remember that you are an Englishman and thus have won first prize in the lottery of life.
  • Can you fit mudguards on your best bike?
    Do you always have the time & energy to wash the salt & muck off it as soon as you get home?
    You're more likely to hit the deck during winter too, so the chances of damaging your bike are higher. Mind you, if you've got 3 grand to spend on a bike, you're probably not bothered about that!

    Exactly, if you can afford to have a bike with top grade componentry eaten to death by salt,grime and winter road censored .....................................no need for a "winter" bike.

    I have a "winter" bike as it makes perfect sense to me.
    Tail end Charlie

    The above post may contain traces of sarcasm or/and bullsh*t.
  • bobtbuilderbobtbuilder Posts: 1,537
    Can you fit mudguards on your best bike?
    Do you always have the time & energy to wash the salt & muck off it as soon as you get home?
    You're more likely to hit the deck during winter too, so the chances of damaging your bike are higher. Mind you, if you've got 3 grand to spend on a bike, you're probably not bothered about that!

    WHS^^^

    I am lucky enough to have a £5k summer bike but would be devastated should anything happen to it and as my financial circumstances have changed, would find it impossible to afford another one of that quality.
  • davieseedaviesee Posts: 6,386
    The main reason is if the roads are treated then the salt can corrode parts.
    Hosing down would be sufficient if it was as simple as that but molasses or similar is added to the salt to make it stick to the road. This also keeps it sticking to your bike so a hose down will not be enough. If it is cold, wet and miserable after a 50+ mile cycle are you going to strip down and clean a bike?
    That's how it was explained to me and I decided to preserve my "good" bike.
    None of the above should be taken seriously, and certainly not personally.
  • timmyturbotimmyturbo Posts: 617
    not all people can afford 2 bikes , but some can, i am stupid and spend £400 a month on beer and fags , i could pretty much afford a scott R1 every with all the taxi and kebab related costs . :D

    but i know quite a few people who would have winter wheels and a winter rear mech , and save the nice wheels and mech from road grit abrasion . cheers
    Britannia waives the rules
  • ddraverddraver Posts: 25,169
    I think it's a brilliant marketing ploy by the industry - good enough to rival the great "disc break pad are ruined if you get a speck of oil on them" swindle in the MTB world.

    On the other hand, n+1 applies and I can see the benefit of having a more relaxed road bike if your "summer" bike is full on racer. Or alternatively get a different sort of bike like a CX bike or MTB and try something different. MTBers dont have Summer/Winter bikes and we don't enjoy ourselves unless we re covered in mud!
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • Chip \'oylerChip \'oyler Posts: 2,323
    ddraver wrote:
    I think it's a brilliant marketing ploy by the industry - good enough to rival the great "disc break pad are ruined if you get a speck of oil on them" swindle in the MTB world.

    On the other hand, n+1 applies and I can see the benefit of having a more relaxed road bike if your "summer" bike is full on racer. Or alternatively get a different sort of bike like a CX bike or MTB and try something different. MTBers dont have Summer/Winter bikes and we don't enjoy ourselves unless we re covered in mud!

    Can you explain where/how the industry 'market' winter bikes?

    The idea of winter bikes has been around for years, borne out of wisdom by older members in cycling clubs, not by the manufacturers.

    Living in Yorkshire, having a winter bikes with mudguards makes sense.

    a) Your censored and feet don't get as wet, meaning you feel more comfortable and able to ride harder/longer
    b) If you CBA cleaning the salt and grime off after your ride in -1 conditions then it doesn't matter
    c) Your winter bike will weigh more - so you get extra training benefits during the winter
    d) you look forward to riding your best bike in the spring – and it will feel amazing when you do

    The original idea for a winter bike was to buy a cheap 2nd hand frame that had mudguard clearance and cascade down parts from your best bike as and when they wore out or you wanted to upgrade.
    Expertly coached by http://www.vitessecyclecoaching.co.uk/

    http://vineristi.wordpress.com - the blog for Viner owners and lovers!
  • Tom ButcherTom Butcher Posts: 3,830
    As above - if you ride regularly in Winter mudguards make things so much nicer - I couldn't fit mudguards onto my race bike.

    Before someone mentions raceblades I'd rather not spend 6 months of the year having them rattling about and have to buy a new set of brake calipers every year because they've been sprayed with censored off the road all Winter.

    As for getting a CX bike or a MTB instead - great if you want to race cross or try MTBing - if you want to get some miles in on the road not so great.

    it's a hard life if you don't weaken.
  • hstileshstiles Posts: 414
    A single example of the industry marketing/hyping Winter bikes. Last week's Cycling Weekly reviewed a Tifosi that was repeatedly referred to as a winter bike. Slightly cheaper, heavier frame, greater mudguard clearance, stronger wheels, etc...

    A CX bike is a good choice for Winter IMHO. I alternate between CX and road tyres, depending on conditions and was able to make it into work on the bike during the snowy conditions last year.

    My CX bike and road bike are both Shimano 105 based, which has the extra benefit of enabling me to borrow parts from either bike in the event of unexpected technical problems.
  • I can't think of any of my clubmates, who've bought a brand new bike especially for winter. It's the old road bike or something picked up 2nd hand.
    Remember that you are an Englishman and thus have won first prize in the lottery of life.
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 65,263 Lives Here
    The first excuse to have another bike....
  • ddraverddraver Posts: 25,169
    edited August 2011
    hstiles wrote:
    A single example of the industry marketing/hyping Winter bikes. Last week's Cycling Weekly reviewed a Tifosi that was repeatedly referred to as a winter bike. Slightly cheaper, heavier frame, greater mudguard clearance, stronger wheels, etc...

    A CX bike is a good choice for Winter IMHO. I alternate between CX and road tyres, depending on conditions and was able to make it into work on the bike during the snowy conditions last year.

    My CX bike and road bike are both Shimano 105 based, which has the extra benefit of enabling me to borrow parts from either bike in the event of unexpected technical problems.

    Testify!

    Thomas - your brakes will not wear out after 6 months of rain, nor will any other part of your bike. There may be some sense in having an alternative to one's stretched out, DuraAce equipped super bike for racing but people seem to think they need a second "winter" aluminium 105 sportive bike for when the other "summer" aluminium 105 sportive bike is in hibernation..Really?
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • Chip \'oylerChip \'oyler Posts: 2,323
    hstiles wrote:
    A single example of the industry marketing/hyping Winter bikes. Last week's Cycling Weekly reviewed a Tifosi that was repeatedly referred to as a winter bike. Slightly cheaper, heavier frame, greater mudguard clearance, stronger wheels, etc...

    A CX bike is a good choice for Winter IMHO. I alternate between CX and road tyres, depending on conditions and was able to make it into work on the bike during the snowy conditions last year.

    My CX bike and road bike are both Shimano 105 based, which has the extra benefit of enabling me to borrow parts from either bike in the event of unexpected technical problems.

    That's another good example of having a winter/2nd bike. Just so long as you run the same drivetrain, then you'll always have a spare wheel, etc to hand just in case something unexpectedly knackers on your best bike
    Expertly coached by http://www.vitessecyclecoaching.co.uk/

    http://vineristi.wordpress.com - the blog for Viner owners and lovers!
  • Homer JHomer J Posts: 920
    Why the heck would you want to ride in the winter? It's wet dark and freezing.. and i'm not talking about eskimo censored
  • So 'winter' begins after the first gritting?
    Team Madison Genesis Volare & Condor Super Acciaio
  • Chip \'oylerChip \'oyler Posts: 2,323
    Homer J wrote:
    Why the heck would you want to ride in the winter? It's wet dark and freezing.. and i'm not talking about eskimo censored

    So you get fitter for the summer.

    All the guys who go quick in the summer will have laid the foundations in the winter
    Expertly coached by http://www.vitessecyclecoaching.co.uk/

    http://vineristi.wordpress.com - the blog for Viner owners and lovers!
  • Gazzetta67Gazzetta67 Posts: 1,890
    So 'winter' begins after the first gritting?

    You southern softies dont know what real winter cycling is - hardly a drop of snow or ice. Would like to see you out training on the roads say around the Highlands in -15 temps or the dales or peak district with Snow,Ice,Salt :D
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    Winter started today for me. Torrential rain and flooded roads. My ride was much more comfortable on my winter fixed wheel. Full mudguards so jacket stayed clean and no soggy shorts.

    I don't see the point in flash winter bikes and the stuff the magazines peddle as suitable for training or wintering on is laughable. They clearly hope to lure gullible MAMILs in.

    When its wet or gritted or risk of ice - my hack is a much better idea to ride.
  • davieseedaviesee Posts: 6,386
    cougie wrote:
    Winter started today for me. Torrential rain and flooded roads

    That's not winter. A lack of snow and ice means it is summer. Surely? :wink:

    That's how it feels up here this year anyway. Winter, a bit of spring in April and straight into the longest autumn in history :cry:
    None of the above should be taken seriously, and certainly not personally.
  • airbusboyairbusboy Posts: 231
    Dura Ace Cassette = £119
    Chain: £30
    Jockey Wheels: £35
    Chainrings: £150+
    Not cheap to replace after winter training miles

    With all the salt, grit, water etc these components simply end up destroyed. It's easier to have a winter bike with cheaper components so when/if they need replacing it's much cheaper.... and when it comes to summer your 3k+ bike runs smoothly and quick....
    'Ride hard for those who can't.....'
  • The OrsThe Ors Posts: 130
    I don't have Summer/Winter bikes but I do have a road bike & a MTB.

    I ride the road bike whenever possible & the MTB when the weather is really bad.

    I have to say though, the roadie is only £800ish worth. If I'd spent £thousands on it then perhaps I wouldn't ride it in the rain either.
  • lfcquinlfcquin Posts: 470
    Personally I love riding my winter bike as much as the summer one. Its a CX bike with big tyres, solid wheels and full mudguards. For the mud covered pot holed ridden Cheshire/Staffordshire lanes its perfect. Every new years day I'm down in Surrey riding in Richmond Park and it always feels a bit unnecessary there, so I guess its horses for courses.

    If you don't feel you need one then don't get one. Simples.

    There is the small matter of most cycling clubs (if you wish to ride with a club) expecting full mudguards on your bike in the winter, so your fellow clubman doesn't get caked in mud but I won't open the bag of worms on that one. :wink:
  • Wirral_paulWirral_paul Posts: 2,476
    Just building up my new winter bike at the moment. Gone for a new chinese carbon frame and am fitting all the "old" summer components to it. I'll fit a wider spaced cassette but only when the current one wears out. The chain when that needs changing will be a cheaper version.

    I'm in the camp of not wanting to ruin my summer bike by riding it in the salt and grime, fitting mudguards and wider tyres to stay dry and hopefully upright etc. I

    f I could afford a £3k+ winter bike and not care about replacement costs then maybe I would ride one. Personally though, whilst my summer bike is £3k+ I simply cant afford to be risking trashing it unduly. I'll be commuting on my winter bike, and so not wanting to clean it daily - so if the chain and cassette wear out due to all the censored on the roads after a few months then i'd rather have a £40 - £50 bill than a £150 one. Summer bike will then feel more "special" when it comes out for a ride come spring / odd sunny winter day.
  • I always seem to end up on my censored in autumn/winter, usually due to ice/gravel/wet leaves etc.

    So this is enough reason to have a 'winter' bike. Not just confined to winter, if the weather is censored at any times of the year out it will come.
    "That's it! You people have stood in my way long enough. I'm going to clown college! " - Homer
  • NuggsNuggs Posts: 1,804
    Just building up my new winter bike at the moment. Gone for a new chinese carbon frame
    Winter bikes cannot be carbon. Carbon will dissolve in winter.

    The exception to this is if the 'new' winter bike is an 'old' summer bike which has been demoted. These are immune from the dissolving problem.

    :wink:
  • eheh Posts: 4,854
    MTBers dont have Summer/Winter bikes and we don't enjoy ourselves unless we re covered in mud!

    Not true I know plenty of people with winter mtbs. A hardtail with Deore level kit for when it's grotty and a pukka full sus for dry conditions.

    Don't most people just end up with a winter bike by default, in that they buy a new bike and keep the old one for winter?
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,123
    When I bought my bike I knew I'd only be spending that amount once, so I went for something I could use year round. That meant clearance & mountsfor proper mudguards / fatter tyres / long drop brakes, but I still wanted something light and fairly racy.

    The Kinesis racelight Tk fitted the bill perfectly, and 3 years later still does. Whip off the guards in the summer, and pop them back on come the autumn. 105 groupset still functioning flawlessly despite the censored winters we've been having of late (I do lots of cleaning and lubing)

    If I was choosing now I'd have another Tk, or possibly the Alu Synapse which 3 years ago didn't have the mudguard clearance it does now.
  • celbianchicelbianchi Posts: 854
    Can you explain where/how the industry 'market' winter bikes?

    The idea of winter bikes has been around for years, borne out of wisdom by older members in cycling clubs, not by the manufacturers.

    Living in Yorkshire, having a winter bikes with mudguards makes sense.

    a) Your ars* and feet don't get as wet, meaning you feel more comfortable and able to ride harder/longer
    b) If you CBA cleaning the salt and grime off after your ride in -1 conditions then it doesn't matter
    c) Your winter bike will weigh more - so you get extra training benefits during the winter d) you look forward to riding your best bike in the spring – and it will feel amazing when you do

    The original idea for a winter bike was to buy a cheap 2nd hand frame that had mudguard clearance and cascade down parts from your best bike as and when they wore out or you wanted to upgrade.

    Regarding the highlighted bit. Thta's not true really is it? If you are riding at lets say an arbitary 250W. If you are doing it at say 20mph on a stripped down race bike or at 13mph on a 23lb winter hack - pray tell me where you get the additional training benefit from 250W at 20 mph or 250W at 13mph?
  • NairnsterNairnster Posts: 602
    I think he is probably making the wrong assumption that you will be riding at the same pace, and so using more power to maintain that on the heavier bike?



    With regards to winter bikes, although I dont own a lightweight top specced steed, I have just ordered myself a 2011 Giant Defy 2 in the sales. The intention is that I will be able to get out in some half decent weather for next month and a bit, and for any ok days during the winter. The bike will be washed after each wet ride and a close eye kept on chain, tyres etc. The bike will prob be getting a 105 upgrade for the summer anyway.

    However, on the particularly crappy weather days which will be unavoidable, my hotch potch slick tyred mtb will be pulled into service:

    DSC00142Medium.jpg
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