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A decent (but not too expensive) disc specific rack

robthehungrymonkeyrobthehungrymonkey Posts: 616
edited September 2011 in Tour & expedition
Hey there

I've had a Kona Sutra for a couple of years and although brilliant in every other way, the rear rack mounts are in a terrible position. They require spacers and surely put a lot more pressure on the mounts. Annoyingly, the rack is really good quality.

I lived with this for a while and rode the bike fully loaded to Morocco without any issues, but after I got back, the welding on one of the mounts failed (ironically, when there was nothing on the rack).

I'm a bit nervous about putting too much weight on the back now and am going on a short tour in a couple of weeks, so thought about sorting it.

I purchased a Maddison Summit rack, which suggested it would fit everything with it's extended "feet". However, the longer feet are straighter than the standard ones, so interfere with the brake caliper. I was hoping that the rack would go under the caliper, coming in from the back.

This is the problem I'm attempting to solve...

P3040013.jpg
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Posts

  • benpinnickbenpinnick Posts: 4,148
    I has the same issue, even when I got one with the extended feet to fit, it broke pretty quickly - the extenders and bolts just arent up to the job. I ended up getting a rack that had a wide stance and adjustable height (lifeline from wiggle I believe) and then added P clips to the seat stays and fitted to that instead. Much more stable. Been commuting on it for 2 years now, no problems.
    A Flock of Birds
    + some other bikes.
  • benpinnick wrote:
    I has the same issue, even when I got one with the extended feet to fit, it broke pretty quickly - the extenders and bolts just arent up to the job. I ended up getting a rack that had a wide stance and adjustable height (lifeline from wiggle I believe) and then added P clips to the seat stays and fitted to that instead. Much more stable. Been commuting on it for 2 years now, no problems.

    I don't suppose you've got any pics have you?

    I'm trying to avoid having legs that are spaced away from the mounts. It adds so much more force to a bit that's already been repaired once.
    http://www.KOWONO.com - Design-Led home furniture and accessories.
  • MichaelWMichaelW Posts: 2,226
    If the frame broke at a rack mounting eyelet, Kona should replace the frame.
    The location of the rack eyelet is fine, it is the disc mount that is in the wrong position. It should be on the chainstay.

    I wouldnt trust any disc-specific rack, they all cantilever the rack out on the end of a bit of metal.
  • MichaelW wrote:
    If the frame broke at a rack mounting eyelet, Kona should replace the frame.
    The location of the rack eyelet is fine, it is the disc mount that is in the wrong position. It should be on the chainstay.

    I wouldnt trust any disc-specific rack, they all cantilever the rack out on the end of a bit of metal.

    Kona repaired the frame under warranty (which I believe is lifetime, as it is steel). However, it was a faff and isn't much help if you're in the middle of nowhere!

    An extention is all i need, like the stainless steel bits below to move the rack backwards so it comes round the calliper from behind, rather than going straight down.
    I just can't bring myself to spend £20 on two tiny bits of metal for a bodge job! And no idea where to get anything like that.

    13240.jpg
    http://www.KOWONO.com - Design-Led home furniture and accessories.
  • alan_shermanalan_sherman Posts: 1,153
    I've just ordered the Blackburn EX-1 disc compatible to go on a frame without rack mounts. It mounts onto the rear wheel skewer (so making removing the rear wheel more of a faff) but should be solid in use. Parker's £35 with free delivery was the best price I could find with stock.

    I should be able to fit over the weekend so can let you know how it goes
  • I've just ordered the Blackburn EX-1 disc compatible to go on a frame without rack mounts. It mounts onto the rear wheel skewer (so making removing the rear wheel more of a faff) but should be solid in use. Parker's £35 with free delivery was the best price I could find with stock.

    I should be able to fit over the weekend so can let you know how it goes

    Hi Alan,

    I've looked at the skewer mounts, but the caliper is directly above the skewer, so I'd have exactly the same problem unfortunately.

    I am still interested how it goes however, as trying to research my problem has given me ways to attach a rack to my girlfriend's road bike without mounts, saving me carrying everything! How are you attaching the top of the rack to the frame?
    http://www.KOWONO.com - Design-Led home furniture and accessories.
  • benpinnickbenpinnick Posts: 4,148
    Can send you a pic later. Basically though just these mounted on the seat stay just above the disc mount. Helps if you have a short rack to stop it being too high.

    http://www.cyclestore.co.uk/productDetails.asp?productID=21009
    A Flock of Birds
    + some other bikes.
  • dilemnadilemna Posts: 2,277
    To answer the Op's title question - there isn't one except the Topeak Suer Tourist DX rack (Disc Specific) which has a cast dog leg on the bottom of the leg which although a nice idea is also likely to fail prematurely IMHO.

    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Mode ... elID=32816


    I have a Kona Kula MTB to which I have now fitted a rear Madison Summit Rack. However I only need to use one spacer about 4-5mm thick (not three like you) as the disc brake cailper (hydraulic) although mounted in same position as your bike's brake caliper is much further in allowing mounting of a rack. Using any spacer is not ideal and creates a turning force in the bolt making it more liable to fail than if the rack leg or mounting plate were secured directly against the frame. As already stated by far the best position for the rear disc brake caliper is inside the rear triangle not behind the seat stay as traditional MTBs have them. Looking at yours I don't think you will over come problems mounting a rear rack to achieve a strong robust mounting on the non drive side.

    The new Kona Sutra has the rear disc brake caliper inside the rear triangle. If this bike was sold to you as a touring bike then I suggest it is most definitely not as pretty much all touring bikes need to carry luggage on a rack which should have a strong and durable mount. Having to space a bolt out that much is just ridicalous. It will not take any weight or last any length of time as it WILL fail prematurely. With the brake caliper in this position you are never going to obtain a strong durable fixing point for your rack as the deisgn is flawed as are many bikes with the rear brake calipers in this orientation that claim to be able to accommodate a rack. If you want to go touring on a bike with disc brakes then make sure the rear caliper is INSIDE the rear triangle. Common sense really. More manufacturers are now waking up to this design flaw.

    I would ask Kona to supply you with a new Kona Sutra frame with the rear caliper inside the rear triangle as you were told this older bike frame was suitable for mounting a rear rack. It clearly isn't.

    In the mean time can you provide a pic of a side on view of the caliper and lower part of the rack as I have made up some brackets which allow the rack to be positioned further behind the drop out thus possibly missing the brake caliper which could be of help to you.

    If you send me your email I can send a pic of the brackets to you. Unfortunately one can't up load pics to bikeradar.
    Life is like a roll of toilet paper; long and useful, but always ends at the wrong moment. Anon.
    Think how stupid the average person is.......
    half of them are even more stupid than you first thought.
  • andymillerandymiller Posts: 2,856
    I'm not sure I agree with you about the rack putting lots of pressure on the mountings. IME (with steel racks - aluminium may be different) is that once the rack is bent outwards it retains its new shape. But you might want to use bigger spacers to spread the load.

    Longer term, a frame with mounts inside the rear triangle might be a solution - but I'm not sure there are any guarantees - a lit depends on the particular combination of brake, frame and rack.
  • alan_shermanalan_sherman Posts: 1,153
    The blackburn EX disc specific rack might work for you, but its tight. The attachment at the wheel skewer is spaced quite wide - presumably to clear dropouts and disc brakes. It must be 25-30 mm then the rack comes out a bit before heading off to the top section as usual.

    It provides a very stable fitting for bikes without eyelets and with vertical dropouts (I wouldn't use with horizontal dropouts as there would be potential for the wheel to move). The top attachments are P clips which are fine as they are not weight bearing. The rack includes 2 sizes of P clips and the longer skewer so all hardware needed is there. I did have to cut down the 'extensions' that slide out to the top mount point as on a race bike frame it is very short. Also i had to drill a couple of holes in the entensions for the rack to extension mount bolt.

    I reckon you could see if you local bike shop will get one in for you andd offer it up to your frame and see if it fits. Otherwise you could use it on the wife's bike!
  • alan_shermanalan_sherman Posts: 1,153
    The blackburn EX disc specific rack might work for you, but its tight. The attachment at the wheel skewer is spaced quite wide - presumably to clear dropouts and disc brakes. It must be 25-30 mm then the rack comes out a bit before heading off to the top section as usual.

    It provides a very stable fitting for bikes without eyelets and with vertical dropouts (I wouldn't use with horizontal dropouts as there would be potential for the wheel to move). The top attachments are P clips which are fine as they are not weight bearing. The rack includes 2 sizes of P clips and the longer skewer so all hardware needed is there. I did have to cut down the 'extensions' that slide out to the top mount point as on a race bike frame it is very short. Also i had to drill a couple of holes in the entensions for the rack to extension mount bolt.

    I reckon you could see if you local bike shop will get one in for you andd offer it up to your frame and see if it fits. Otherwise you could use it on the wife's bike!
  • dilemna wrote:
    To answer the Op's title question - there isn't one except the Topeak Suer Tourist DX rack (Disc Specific) which has a cast dog leg on the bottom of the leg which although a nice idea is also likely to fail prematurely IMHO.
    .

    I can confirm this, mine kept bending the long bolt (22mm if my memory is correct) that attached it to the frame on the disk side. It never actually snapped in 2 years of use but every time I checked it it would be bent so I'd replace it regularly.

    I currently use a Tubus Logo (with 2 of the supplied spacers) on my Day One Alfine which also stupidly has the brake positioned in the same place as yours and not on the chainstay where it would be best. I can't vouch for the longevity yet though as it's fairly new.
  • dilemna wrote:
    To answer the Op's title question - there isn't one except the Topeak Suer Tourist DX rack (Disc Specific) which has a cast dog leg on the bottom of the leg which although a nice idea is also likely to fail prematurely IMHO.

    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Mode ... elID=32816

    I have used this rack on a Spesh Rockhopper Disc - for the WOTR C2C.

    Worked fine, very sturdy. Only issue was I knackered the thread on the bike where it mounts, my fault.

    FYI - it carried all the gear for the three day trip inc camping.
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