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Touring on a CX bike?

MaxwellBygravesMaxwellBygraves Posts: 1,455
edited August 2011 in Tour & expedition
I've noticed most CX bikes come available to fit rack/guards.

Mate of mine wants to do a bit of touring in the UK next summer. I've always wanted a CX bike, just neve got round to getting one, and don't want to buy a full on tourer.

Can you get away with touring on a CX with a rear rack with panniers? We'd probably stick to the road and fit some slick tyres if that makes any difference.

Good idea or not?
"That's it! You people have stood in my way long enough. I'm going to clown college! " - Homer

Posts

  • APIIIAPIII Posts: 2,010
    I can't see why not. My CX has rack mounts, although I haven't got around to touring on it yet. I met a guy on the marmotte a few years ago who had just done a long tour on his cx bike.
  • dilemnadilemna Posts: 2,277
    I've noticed most CX bikes come available to fit rack/guards.

    Mate of mine wants to do a bit of touring in the UK next summer. I've always wanted a CX bike, just neve got round to getting one, and don't want to buy a full on tourer.

    Can you get away with touring on a CX with a rear rack with panniers? We'd probably stick to the road and fit some slick tyres if that makes any difference.

    Good idea or not?

    No idea. If my purpose for cycling was touring then I'd buy a touring/expedition bike not a CX bike, but then that is just me. Like wise if my reason for cycling was for CXing I wouldn't buy a TT bike :wink: .
    Life is like a roll of toilet paper; long and useful, but always ends at the wrong moment. Anon.
    Think how stupid the average person is.......
    half of them are even more stupid than you first thought.
  • meanredspidermeanredspider Posts: 12,550
    A lot of CX bikes are marketed as CX AND Touring bikes as well as commuting. I'm sure the Boardman CX Team I've just bought would make a good touring bike with some approriate tyres on it - robust & comfortable enough but also reasonably quick. I'm guessing very few CX bikes get used for CX.
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
  • cjcpcjcp Posts: 13,345
    I'm considering using my Kona Jake for a ride from North to South Wales next year. The only thing which makes me hesitant about this is the lack of braking power offered by the canti brakes. They're not very good in the rain on the flat, so, if I'm faced with a sharp descent in the rain (it's Wales, after all) with the extra weight, it isn't going to be enjoyable.

    So, I'd buy one with good disc brakes or go for a tourer.
    FCN 2-4.

    "What happens when the hammer goes down, kids?"
    "It stays down, Daddy."
    "Exactly."
  • I recently toured fully loaded and camping on a Surly Crosscheck and it performed excellently. A bit on the heavy side but that's not an issue with panniers and tent plus mudguards. The only possible downside is the geometry and I did find that my heels would sometimes clip the pannier bags but by slightly adjusting my pedalling style this was not a concern at all. All I did was put some 700x28c Conti Gatorskins on it and a Brooks saddle plus the rack and guards and was ready to go. Also it means that if you want to use it as a CX bike all you have to do is remove that stuff and put the chunky tyres back on and its two bikes in one.
    Surly Crosscheck
    Specialized Allez
    Lemond Alpe D'huez framed fixie
  • AndyOgyAndyOgy Posts: 579
    Well, there was that guy who just smashed Mark Beaumont's record for circumnavigating the globe, fully loaded, on a Cyclocross bike.

    So, unless you're planning on riding further than around the world, a Cyclocross bike should suffice.
  • themightywthemightyw Posts: 409
    At the end of second out of three days riding Hadrians Wall cycle route on my Planet X Uncle John. Certainly a dedicated tourer would perform and handle better but then a dedicated tourer wouldn't be half as much fun charging around in the mud in winter time. Made a couple of slight adjustments for comfort and practicality but have been delighted with how versatile it is, and it's fully loaded.
  • flesterflester Posts: 464
    might not have the rigidity of a tourer in terms of load carrying ? I;d have said a tourer is the most versatile all-round bike for those not racing or or off-road

    'I do not believe in the three-speed gear at all', the sergeant was saying. 'It is a newfangled instrument, it crucificies the legs, the half of the accidents are due to it.' (From 'The Third Policeman')
  • Thanks for the replies!

    I can appreciate that it might not be perfect but it just needs to be do-able.

    A good analogy would be using a road bike for a TT - not the best machine for the job, but perfectly capable with a few adjustments.

    So, anyone recommend a good CX bike with discs under a grand?!
    "That's it! You people have stood in my way long enough. I'm going to clown college! " - Homer
  • AndyOgyAndyOgy Posts: 579
    There's only one; The Genesis Croix De Fer.
  • iPeteiPete Posts: 6,076
    IMG_0798-France-PS.jpg

    Don't see why not, have toured on a roadie, a CX should take to it even easier as long as the gearing is suitable for loaded climbing. (my roadie wasn't :lol: )
  • themightywthemightyw Posts: 409
    0_0_0b0be759cff8c107f6439a38c2c077b7_1.jpg

    This is me, this morning, at the highest point of the Hadrian's Wall Coast to Coast ride. The only thing I'd have changed about the whole ride was the strength in my legs. Rode a Planet X UJ, not particularly fit, and didn't have a complaint about the bike the whole way round. Even got me up some pretty horrible 18% climbs and I was pretty fully loaded.

    Sure, a dedicated tourer would have been a wee bit more comfortable, and handled a smidge better. I'd love one, and it's probably the next bike I'd buy. But unless you're doing serious touring it really won't hold you back.
  • themightyw wrote:
    0_0_0b0be759cff8c107f6439a38c2c077b7_1.jpg

    This is me, this morning, at the highest point of the Hadrian's Wall Coast to Coast ride. The only thing I'd have changed about the whole ride was the strength in my legs. Rode a Planet X UJ, not particularly fit, and didn't have a complaint about the bike the whole way round. Even got me up some pretty horrible 18% climbs and I was pretty fully loaded.

    Sure, a dedicated tourer would have been a wee bit more comfortable, and handled a smidge better. I'd love one, and it's probably the next bike I'd buy. But unless you're doing serious touring it really won't hold you back.

    Top man thanks for that. Did you enjoy the C2C?
    "That's it! You people have stood in my way long enough. I'm going to clown college! " - Homer
  • Wallace1492Wallace1492 Posts: 3,707
    Did 600 miles up west coast of Scotland in July on a Tricross. Superb bike, comfortable, carried a heavy load - full camping kit. Found the brakes were OK even in the wet, but a disk would be even better if money was no object, but the Tricross is great value for money.
    "Encyclopaedia is a fetish for very small bicycles"
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