Forum home Road cycling forum The bottom bracket

Any Police Help with Some Info ?

pat1cppat1cp Posts: 766
edited August 2011 in The bottom bracket
A friend of mine recently bought his wife a new car. Prior to picking it up (2 weeks ago) he arranged to have his wife's private plate put on the vehicle. Anyway, this morning she got pulled over by to two traffic vehicles, the car's been involved in a "drug deal".

Can anyone tell me if the police scanner/gadget thing scans the number plate, then checks the vehicle details (chassis no.) or, it just checks the number plate??

He's interested to find out if :-
a) The car he's bought has belonged to a drug dealer in a previous life (RR Sport) or,
b) Somebody's doing drug deals in another vehicle with his wife's number plates on

?????

I suspect if the answer is a) he'll try and return the vehicle.

Thanks in advance,

Pat

Posts

  • MonkeypumpMonkeypump Posts: 1,528
    or

    c) His wife has a secret sideline supplying bolivian marching powder

    ?
  • MonkeypumpMonkeypump Posts: 1,528
    To answer more seriously, the check should give background on the vehicle, i.e. make, model, etc. I'm not sure what else would come up. Perhaps whether it's taxed and insured?
  • pat1cppat1cp Posts: 766
    Not sure if she's a "supplier", she was devastated. They live in quite a small town and the rozzers got her in a pincer movement outside Tesco :oops: :oops:
  • tmgtmg Posts: 651
    They use ANPR (Automatic Number Plate Recognition) system, so there would be a marker on their database against the plate, not the car. If they did their job they would have looked more closely at the marker and that would of told them if there was a match on the other parts such as make, model etc. But seems like the cops involved in this reacted and then did the investigating afterwards, which leaves your friends wife a tad distressed. Or they saw her buying copiase amounts of glucose powder in Tesco's.

    The other alternative is that your mates a drug dealer and he used the proceeds to buy the car and the plate and he's not telling you the whole story :wink:
  • gmbgmb Posts: 456
    It sounds like an ANPR hit. Basically there is a camera in a police car which scans registration plates. This is linked to police intelligence. For example if a cop had information that the owner of a vehicle was often involved in a type of activity they could submit a report with the number plate and the next time the vehicle set of the Automatic Number Plate Recognition system it would flag up that the car was worth a stop. Once the vehicle is stopped the cop would probably then carry out a PNC (Police National Computer) check on the person(s) in the vehicle and the vehicle itself which would reveal, in your friend's case that she is a new registered keeper and any convictions your friends may have.
    Trying Is The First Step Towards Failure

    De Rosa Milanino :-
    http://i851.photobucket.com/albums/ab78 ... -00148.jpg
  • thecrofterthecrofter Posts: 734
    It's your wife's plate that thrown up the hit. Nothing to do with what vehicle the plate is on. And definately not the fault of the garage it was purchased from. Sounds like someone's cloned the plate.

    I would be astonished if the garage saw this as a valid reason for rejecting the vehicle, good luck with that.
    You've no won the Big Cup since 1902!
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    Got to be to do with the wifes number plates.
  • YossieYossie Posts: 2,600
    Agree - it's the plate, not the car.

    A friend bought a motorbike a few years that was perviously unkowingly owned by a small time local dealer - he kept on getting pulled over by the Feds because if the plate. As soon as he took off his helmet the Feds would stop walking across, mumble profuse apologies in whatever pidgin language they speak for wasting his time and go off to bust someone else for a crime they hadn't committed.

    I think that after about 6 months they finally realsied that he wasn't Pablo Escobar and so stopped harrassing him.

    I think your mate needs to have some words with Mrs Mate.
  • A cloned numberplate sounds the most obvious answer.
    Somewhere, some scrote is driving an identical model, make & colour of car, with your missus's number plates on it.
    Don't be surprised if you start getting loads of parking tickets & other camera-enforced tickets.
    You'll get no joy rejecting the car, the police will now have it flagged on their system as a cloned plate, so make sure the wife takes her V5 & Driving Licence with her, whenever she's out in it.
    Remember that you are an Englishman and thus have won first prize in the lottery of life.
  • izzaizza Posts: 1,561
    A cloned numberplate sounds the most obvious answer.
    Somewhere, some scrote is driving an identical model, make & colour of car, with your missus's number plates on it.
    Don't be surprised if you start getting loads of parking tickets & other camera-enforced tickets.
    You'll get no joy rejecting the car, the police will now have it flagged on their system as a cloned plate, so make sure the wife takes her V5 & Driving Licence with her, whenever she's out in it.

    I recently sold wife's car to a mate and upgraded to a car made by same manufacturer (Audi).

    Whilst in the process of transferring plate the old car got stolen. So PNC, they are looking for an Audi with the wife's plates on it. Net result, same as cloned plate - repeated stops whilst police look for stolen car. Went to local police station and after discussion and phonecalls we agreed a password to be logged on PNC. If wife gets stopped now, less hassle than going through paperwork.
  • coombsfhcoombsfh Posts: 186
    Will be cloned plates, probably on another RR sport. It will be relatively easy to clear up so long as the V5 matches up with chassis and engine stamps. Having a similar problem with a harley davidson Vrod at the moment and it is just a case of waiting a few weeks for DVLA to behave.
  • Yossie wrote:
    ...whatever pidgin language they speak...

    What, you mean they also use words like: "perviously", "unkowingly", "realsied", "harrassing", perhaps?
  • MattC59MattC59 Posts: 5,408
    Yossie wrote:
    ...whatever pidgin language they speak...

    What, you mean they also use words like: "perviously", "unkowingly", "realsied", "harrassing", perhaps?

    ooooh........... nothing quite a sharp as correcting someone's spelling or gramma on the internet :roll:

    grammasheriff.jpg
    Science adjusts it’s beliefs based on what’s observed.
    Faith is the denial of observation so that Belief can be preserved
  • bails87bails87 Posts: 12,998
    I simply refuse to believe that a Range Rover Sport could ever be owned by anyone other than a fine, upstanding, law-abiding member of the community :wink:
    MTB/CX

    "As I said last time, it won't happen again."
  • estampidaestampida Posts: 1,008
    it will be the plates, see the cops and sort it out

    but a rrs with private plates, advertises and looks for trouble

    should have bought a yaris, eh :roll:
  • coopsman1coopsman1 Posts: 337
    has anyone thought this:

    The DVLA have been informed that vehicle 123 456 has just changed it's number plate to 111 111.

    Now correct me if I am wrong but......If the vehicle was used as a drugs vehicle on plate 123 456 then it will still flag up under the new plate because the DVLA system keeps a record of the cars history.

    Therfore even if you change the plates and the car has markers on the system it will still ping you on your new plate.
  • bompingtonbompington Posts: 7,674
    MattC59 wrote:
    Yossie wrote:
    ...whatever pidgin language they speak...

    What, you mean they also use words like: "perviously", "unkowingly", "realsied", "harrassing", perhaps?

    ooooh........... nothing quite a sharp as correcting someone's spelling or gramma on the internet :roll:
    Reasonable enough when the first post was a cheap dig at a whole group of people that included a reference to poor English.

    21_misspelling-still-matters.gif
  • pepelepewpepelepew Posts: 180
    Yossie wrote:
    Agree - it's the plate, not the car.

    A friend bought a motorbike a few years that was perviously unkowingly owned by a small time local dealer - he kept on getting pulled over by the Feds because if the plate. As soon as he took off his helmet the Feds would stop walking across, mumble profuse apologies in whatever pidgin language they speak for wasting his time and go off to bust someone else for a crime they hadn't committed.

    I think that after about 6 months they finally realsied that he wasn't Pablo Escobar and so stopped harrassing him.

    I think your mate needs to have some words with Mrs Mate.

    Are you 12?
    Det. Sgt. George Carter: Do you know what, Jack? You're full of sh!t.
    Det. Insp. Jack Regan: I thought it was about time you made an intellectual contribution to this debate.
    Det. Sgt. George Carter: [email protected]
  • pepelepewpepelepew Posts: 180
    tmg wrote:
    They use ANPR (Automatic Number Plate Recognition) If they did their job they would have looked more closely at the marker and that would have told them if there was a match on the other parts such as make, model etc. But seems like the cops involved in this reacted and then did the investigating afterwards, which leaves your friends wife a tad distressed.

    You're going to have to explain to me how they didn't do their job. Car pings ANPR, vehicle stopped. Details checked and she's on her way. The OP doesn't state driver was arrested so checks must have shown all OK. Maybe a bit embarrassing for driver but what is the alternative.

    What should they have done? Just because the ANPR marker holds other details should they not stop the car anyway?

    What if, now here's a thought, the previous 'drugs baron' has put the plate on another car illegally. That wouldn't match the ANPR details either. Should they not stop the car in case the driver is embarrassed? Fair enough, because ANPR says mr Drugs Baron drives X model car, and this is on Y model. Can't be anything in it, so let's not bother stopping it. :roll:
    Det. Sgt. George Carter: Do you know what, Jack? You're full of sh!t.
    Det. Insp. Jack Regan: I thought it was about time you made an intellectual contribution to this debate.
    Det. Sgt. George Carter: [email protected]
  • Red RockRed Rock Posts: 517
    coopsman1 wrote:
    has anyone thought this:

    The DVLA have been informed that vehicle 123 456 has just changed it's number plate to 111 111.

    Now correct me if I am wrong but......If the vehicle was used as a drugs vehicle on plate 123 456 then it will still flag up under the new plate because the DVLA system keeps a record of the cars history.

    Therfore even if you change the plates and the car has markers on the system it will still ping you on your new plate.

    This is the most likely reason for her being stopped, as there wasn't an issue with the number plate prior to the change over. It should be a simple case of them de-flagging the vehicle and no further problems (stops).
  • StillGoingStillGoing Posts: 5,207
    ANPR works off the registration number. That is all it is looking for. SO if a registration for a target vehicle passes through the camera it will alert the monitoring team who will inform the stop team further along the road. Once the vehicle is stopped they will do further checks with PNC on make, model and chassis numbers. The priority is to get the vehicle stopped first. They aren't picking on anyone with nothing better to do as one fool has claimed.

    If as a result of the check they establish that the vehicle has been sold on, a report should be submitted to get the ANPR marker removed and prevent future hits. ANPR doesn't work just for recordable crime issues but also for road traffic issues i.e. no insurance or VEL, cloned plate etc.

    Your wife's cars could have been a hire or courtesy car prior to sale used by someone linked with drugs. It could have been previously owned by someone with a drugs marker. It could also be you've bought it from a dodgy car salesman who used his forecourt fleet to get around and he has the drugs marker. Whoever it is he only has to have been seen driving it once for the intelligence report to generate an ANPR link to that registration. Second hand car sales are a very good way of laundering money.
    I ride a bike. Doesn't make me green or a tree hugger. I drive a car too.
Sign In or Register to comment.