mixed tyre combo

neeb
neeb Posts: 4,467
edited July 2011 in Road buying advice
Thinking of combining a Pro3 race (700x23) on the rear with a veloflex corsa 22 on the front. Partially because I already have a single new veloflex, I need a new rear, and Pro3 are easier to get hold of, but I also thought it might be a good combination in any case - veloflex for grip at the front when cornering/descending and a nice feel under the bars, pro3 at the back for (slightly) greater durability/puncture resistance.

Any reason why this might not be ideal, other than non-matching logos? (they'll both be black tyres and the logo lettering fonts (if not what they say) sort of match.. :wink:

Comments

  • ShutUpLegs
    ShutUpLegs Posts: 3,522
    I read somewhere it was recommended not to mix cross ply and radial tyres on the same axle
  • neeb
    neeb Posts: 4,467
    ShutUpLegs wrote:
    I read somewhere it was recommended not to mix cross ply and radial tyres on the same axle
    I'll make sure not to try it on my trike then... :wink:
  • dawebbo
    dawebbo Posts: 456
    Is this a genuine question?
  • markos1963
    markos1963 Posts: 3,724
    dawebbo wrote:
    Is this a genuine question?

    I can't see why it shouldn't be

    I would recommend fitting an evenly matched pair of tyres grip wise. Whilst it might make sense to fit a grippier front you'll get used to it and start to push harder through the bends until the day the rear one lets go unexpectedly and you end up on the deck.
  • chrishd883
    chrishd883 Posts: 159
    Just fittted a new pair of Scwalbe Ultremo DD's to my Synapse
    But prior to that I ran a combination of Hutchinson on the front and Pro 2 on the back.

    Why? Because that's what I had hanging arouund in the shed and both tyres were better than the standard rubber that came with the bike as standard!

    Never had any problems. But - bearing in mind the previous post - I probably don't push my tyres to the limit of grip to notice the difference.

    My question would be - if you are moving to Pro 3's for puncture resistance and durability - how bad is the other tyre in this respect?

    Big fan of the Pro 2 - but after one pair of Pro 3's I'm looking for alternatives!
  • jf22901
    jf22901 Posts: 155
    dawebbo wrote:
    Is this a genuine question?
    It's quite common in mountain biking circles to have different front and back tyres: one on the back for speed and one on the front for grip. Indeed, that's what's on my mountain bike.

    I'm not sure if it's the 'done thing' on road bikes though. But you know what lycra-clad road riders are like - everything's got to match! :D:D:D
  • balthazar
    balthazar Posts: 1,565
    I invariably have different tyres on each wheel, because I replace tyres singly, as they wear out or are terminally damaged. Their "life cycles" rarely coincide, and I can't see the point in wasting a good part worn tyre.
  • neeb
    neeb Posts: 4,467
    Yes, it was a genuine question although I guess borderline suitability for here as opposed to cakestop.. :wink:

    Obviously there's no particular reason it should be a problem, just wondering if anyone would deliberately choose such a set up instead of a matched pair (i.e. same brand) back & front.
    My question would be - if you are moving to Pro 3's for puncture resistance and durability - how bad is the other tyre in this respect?
    The veloflex seem to cut really easily - the reason I only have one is that after buying two, the other one got a fairly big cut from a piece of glass right in the middle of the tread that went all of the way through the casing... I'm pretty sure that the pro3s would have stood up to that, mine usually have loads of small cuts in the outer layer that don't go right through. Or maybe I was just unlucky in this one instance. Makes me wary about shelling out a small fortune for a replacement veloflex (even if I could find one right now). However, they do ride nicely...
    I would recommend fitting an evenly matched pair of tyres grip wise. Whilst it might make sense to fit a grippier front you'll get used to it and start to push harder through the bends until the day the rear one lets go unexpectedly and you end up on the deck.
    That's the sort of thing I was vaguely wondering about,