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Carbon bike all year round??

MIABSMIABS Posts: 53
edited June 2011 in Road beginners
I've seen at Ribble they do the winter training bike with mudguards. Seen them on the road with alu frame.
Just wondered do people with carbon bikes not use them all year round?
If not what is the reason? Is carbon affected by the cold?
I ask as I have a alu frame bike and would likely sell it to get a carbon bike to use all year. I couldnt afford to have 2 bikes.
Ive heard people mention carbon bikes for the summer and a alu bike as a back up for winter with mud guards.
My ride: Ribble New Sportive Racing

Posts

  • Rule74PleaseRule74Please Posts: 307
    yes you only need 1 bike
  • e999same999sam Posts: 447
    No reason why you couldn't ride a carbon bike through the winter. I chose not to because I don't find it necessary to have such an expensive bike for going to work and back and I have yet to see one that has mudguard eyes.
  • cornerblockcornerblock Posts: 3,228
    yes you only need 1 bike

    WHAT!!!!! Wash your mouth out. One bike? Never read such tosh! No reason at all why you can't ride a carbon bike all year. As for 'mudguard eyes', just use Cruds, as long as you have 5mm clearance they're fine.
  • chrishd883chrishd883 Posts: 159
    Carbon bike for the summer? Yes! For most that is.....!??!

    Probably two main reasons
    - lack of mudguard eyelets for the winter commute.
    - best bike syndrome!

    If you have more than one bike there is a good chance that your "best bike" wll have a carbon frame.After all iIt is the current marketing choice of frame material.

    I think you will see more carbon bikes in the winter as they become older and are down graded by newer purchases.

    But no, there's no reason not to use a carbon bike in winter.
    If you need mudguards - try the Crud Roadracers!
  • cornerblockcornerblock Posts: 3,228
    chrishd883 wrote:
    Carbon bike for the summer? Yes! For most that is.....!??!

    Probably two main reasons
    - lack of mudguard eyelets for the winter commute.
    - best bike syndrome!

    If you have more than one bike there is a good chance that your "best bike" wll have a carbon frame.After all iIt is the current marketing choice of frame material.

    I think you will see more carbon bikes in the winter as they become older and are down graded by newer purchases.

    But no, there's no reason not to use a carbon bike in winter.
    If you need mudguards - try the Crud Roadracers!

    Is there an echo in here? :?
  • LagavulinLagavulin Posts: 1,742
    Would like something like a Dolan Dual or Pearson offer a carbon Audax bike.

    As per previous, most don't have eyelets or clearances for guards (although both my Wilier and alu' 'dale have bigger clearances than the Allez I'm using with Crud 2s).

    I'm certainly in the best bike syndrome camp. I expose neither of mine to the sludge, grime, censored and evil paste that accumulates on the roads and on your bike during winter.
  • cornerblockcornerblock Posts: 3,228
    I know it's not been the best of summers so far, but what the f*** are we doing talking about winter bikes?!!!
  • nferrarnferrar Posts: 2,511
    A lot of people want a cheap winter bike so they don't wear out the drive train etc. on their best bike (I guess you're also probably more likely to crash in winter), alu bikes are generally cheaper than carbon hence a lot of bikes marketed as winter bikes are alu. I currently only have 1 road bike (carbon) and it does me fine over the winter, getting a second bike soon though so I'll have carbon winter and summer bikes~
  • gmbgmb Posts: 456
    I sold my winter bike (alu) and now just have one carbon bike. The reason for this was because I wasn't using the carbon bike at all. Too scared to get it dirty!

    What's the point in owning a bike that's going to get minimal use? How long do people keep bikes for? There seems to be very high turn over on here of people trading parts/frames and constantly upgrading bikes.

    I'm going to use my bike throughout the winter (may change the carbon clinchers for PX model B's but haven't decided yet) and enjoy it!!
    Trying Is The First Step Towards Failure

    De Rosa Milanino :-
    http://i851.photobucket.com/albums/ab78 ... -00148.jpg
  • FSR_XCFSR_XC Posts: 2,258
    Of course you can use a carbon bike all year round - my mountainbike is carbon!!!
    Stumpjumper FSR 09/10 Pro Carbon, Genesis Vapour CX20 ('17)Carbon, Rose Xeon CW3000 '14, Raleigh R50

    http://www.visiontrack.com
  • Dodger747Dodger747 Posts: 305
    Yep and carbon clinchers all year round too... 8)
    VO2 Max - 79 ml/kg/min
    W/kg - 4.9
  • colsoopcolsoop Posts: 217
    I used my Planet x sl pro all last winter no worries at all.
  • CiBCiB Posts: 6,098
    gmb wrote:
    I sold my winter bike (alu) and now just have one carbon bike. The reason for this was because I wasn't using the carbon bike at all. Too scared to get it dirty!

    What's the point in owning a bike that's going to get minimal use? How long do people keep bikes for? There seems to be very high turn over on here of people trading parts/frames and constantly upgrading bikes.

    I'm going to use my bike throughout the winter (may change the carbon clinchers for PX model B's but haven't decided yet) and enjoy it!!
    I use the carbon bike all year round - it doesn't make sense to me to ride a bike a bike that's not as good as the bike I really wanted. What are you saving? A bit of wear? Big deal. Clean it & relube it if it gets wet. I'd rather ride the good bike all year than have it sitting in the shed not being used for 6 months and have to ride a lesser machine in its place. Each to their own though.
  • mike ivesmike ives Posts: 319
    I've got some of these on one of my bikes.


    http://www.dotbike.com/p/4043

    They are detachable, cheap and do a very good job of keeping the mud off your feet and back. They don't do much for the person riding behind though. Hey, they should be up riding front anyway.
  • mike ivesmike ives Posts: 319
    Sorry; I forgot to put the link in.

    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Mode ... elID=29719
  • turnerjohnturnerjohn Posts: 1,249
    yes you only need 1 bike

    WHAT!!!!! Wash your mouth out. One bike? Never read such tosh! No reason at all why you can't ride a carbon bike all year. As for 'mudguard eyes', just use Cruds, as long as you have 5mm clearance they're fine.

    +1 no such thing as to many bikes !

    O.P. yep I've a carbon road bike...riden all through the winter with no issues....never have to worry about rust :D
  • Rule74PleaseRule74Please Posts: 307
    I said need.

    The correct number is calculated below.

    Rule #12

    The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.

    While the minimum number of bikes one should own is three, the correct number is n+1, where n is the number of bikes currently owned. This equation may also be re-written as s-1, where s is the number of bikes owned that would result in separation from your partner.


    For me s-1 =2 not 3
  • davenicedavenice Posts: 72
    mike ives wrote:
    I've got some of these on one of my bikes.
    http://www.dotbike.com/p/4043

    Those look great! I've got a Secteur and find it a bit of a pain getting the SKS mudguards to stay in the right place.

    I can't see any bolt holes in the right places, though... Do they attach in some cunning way to the brake mount, or do you need a special mount?

    Thanks!

    Dave
  • Craig McACraig McA Posts: 21
    No problem as long as you wash it and clean it well
  • gmbgmb Posts: 456
    CiB wrote:
    gmb wrote:
    I sold my winter bike (alu) and now just have one carbon bike. The reason for this was because I wasn't using the carbon bike at all. Too scared to get it dirty!

    What's the point in owning a bike that's going to get minimal use? How long do people keep bikes for? There seems to be very high turn over on here of people trading parts/frames and constantly upgrading bikes.

    I'm going to use my bike throughout the winter (may change the carbon clinchers for PX model B's but haven't decided yet) and enjoy it!!
    I use the carbon bike all year round - it doesn't make sense to me to ride a bike a bike that's not as good as the bike I really wanted. What are you saving? A bit of wear? Big deal. Clean it & relube it if it gets wet. I'd rather ride the good bike all year than have it sitting in the shed not being used for 6 months and have to ride a lesser machine in its place. Each to their own though.

    While this may seem totally obvious to most sentient beings it only recently occurred to me! I had a Giant OCR 3 which I quite liked, but I used to long for sunny days so I could ride my PX SL Pro. I now think - I've paid for it, use it! I get out little enough, what with family commitments, work etc. Why not enjoy my best bike whenever I can?

    I'm also taking this approach with my wife. I'm going to leave her in the shed more often (may even put her on ebay, should get a good price - minimal use) and take the girlfriend out instead...
    Trying Is The First Step Towards Failure

    De Rosa Milanino :-
    http://i851.photobucket.com/albums/ab78 ... -00148.jpg
  • gavbarrongavbarron Posts: 824
    As people have said, the two main reasons that some carbon bikes stay inside over winter are the increased wear on the drivetrain and also the increased risk of a spill and the consequent damage.

    I use a heavy old frame over winter for the same reasons but also because after a cold wet ride in winter I don't want to then have to start cleaning and lubing up a bike, my winter bike just gets chucked back in the garage without guilt, it cost me very little, is very old for a bike now and has never needed one part replacing yet other than tyres.

    I also have the added bonus (albeit slightly psychological) of training on a big heavy winter bike with heavy tyres and then jumping onto a light fast bike come race time which makes me AT LEAST 7mph faster :D :roll:
  • mike ivesmike ives Posts: 319
    The BBB removable mudguards have a clip which attaches to the frame behind each brake mount. These stay on permanently whilst the mudguards just clip on to theses whenever you want to use them. Or vice versa.

    A friend of mine turned down a Sunday ride recently because he didn't want to get his nice titanium bike wet. What have things come to?
  • gavbarrongavbarron Posts: 824
    Surely one of the many benefits of titanium is the fact that you could ride it year round in awful weather and the frame will take it!?!

    If I thought my carbon bike would survive a crash then I'd ride it every day in winter, its a much nicer place to be than my winter bike
  • springtide9springtide9 Posts: 1,731
    Easy for me. The wife only allows me to have one road bike. I also get out on a real bike so little it's a no brainier. Life is for living and you only have 'one turn'.
    I would use a second bike if I commuted to avoid excessive wear and tear.. but I think you really have got to ask yourself the benefits of owning a fantastic bike if you don't ride the thing.
    For me it's about overall enjoyment... I would rather ride a fairly nice bike all year round rather than a crappy one for 9 months and a amazing one for 3 months of the year.
    Simon
  • bails87bails87 Posts: 13,317
    gavbarron wrote:
    If I thought my carbon bike would survive a crash then I'd ride it every day in winter, its a much nicer place to be than my winter bike

    I got hit by a car whilst riding my carbon Ribble and it was fine.

    My carbon MTB also survives being smacked by big pointy rocks, but then I suppose it's designed for it.
    MTB/CX

    "As I said last time, it won't happen again."
  • gavbarrongavbarron Posts: 824
    I've no doubt it would survive a spill but i don't see a need to risk it on top of the extra wear when I have an older bike sat in the garage waiting to be abused an neglected. I'd suggest you were lucky with the car (well the bike was), I too got hit by a car in January and very little survived, I'm just glad I did
  • springtide9springtide9 Posts: 1,731
    edited June 2011
    I guess you can crash both in summer and winter.

    TBH, apart from obviously ice that can catch you out... you basically ride to the current road conditions, summer or winter. I don't really get (ice excluded) why people consider the roads more dangerous in the winter months. I feel more nervous due to grit rather than a wet road.
    Personally think the worst time of year is the autumn, due to the fallen leaves.. but still pretty much a non issue.

    A bit of salt water never hurt anything... apart from obviously the corrosion it has on steel AND aluminium :) ... and obviously not forgetting the mudguard issue. And obviously bike manufacturers like you to think you need more than one bike... as they get to sell more!
    Simon
  • Rule74PleaseRule74Please Posts: 307
    Why does everyone talk about drivetrain wear in the winter?

    Surely we are all on 9 or 10 or 11 speed by now. With any of these you will still go thru a chain and cassette over the winter months

    Ride the bike you like and just replace the bits as they wear
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