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Carbon Frame And Workstand/Clamp

mattsawmattsaw Posts: 907
edited April 2011 in Road beginners
I'm thinking of looking for a workstand, but I have a carbon frame and seatpost.

Is it a bad idea, or anything I should know?
Bianchi C2C - Ritte Bosberg - Cervelo R3
Strava

Posts

  • rolf_frolf_f Posts: 15,959
    I have one of these: http://www.evanscycles.com/products/par ... gn=froogle

    It clamps the bike by front or rear dropouts and the frame is supported at the bottom bracket and held in place by a strap. A bit faffier than normal stands (particularly if you use full mudguards) but, once on, you get equal access to both sides and it all feels nicely held together!

    I think you can get similar stands from other companies. Not sure how much cheaper they are but this thing feels like it is made from spares from the Forth Rail Bridge :lol:
    Faster than a tent.......
  • turnerjohnturnerjohn Posts: 1,249
    best to swap the post for a cheap alloy one and clamp round the seatpost...tis what the good bikeshops do 8)
  • c0ugarsc0ugars Posts: 202
    What John said!!
  • fossyantfossyant Posts: 2,549
    Clamp the seat post.

    You don't need it tight. If you do you are a monkey.

    I don't clamp my steel bikes tight....

    Wrap frame or post with some thin kitchen cloth, and put in clamp and tighten, it should just hold it, no big forces are needed.....

    Any big wrench wielding is best done with bike on the floor.....
  • clamp on the top tube. The tube is perfectly strong enough to cope with anything you would normally do.
  • giant_mangiant_man Posts: 6,890
    turnerjohn wrote:
    best to swap the post for a cheap alloy one and clamp round the seatpost...tis what the good bikeshops do 8)
    +1 - this is common sense way to go imo.
  • NavrigNavrig Posts: 1,352
    I wrap the top tube in foam and then apply the clamp loosely to the foam wrapping. Even with the tightening lever applied it is still quite loosely clamped. I then turn the lever so it is being screwed to a tightish clamp. Once I am happy with the degree of fixity I stop tightening and get on with the job.

    Adopting this approach you avoid the situation is a sudden over clamped load being applied as a shock load.

    As said above it you need it so tight you will damage the tube then work with bike on the floor and use the clamp to stabilaise rather than clamp.

    I have the Edin Bike Coop Evolution stand which seems to be the same as the Ribble one.
  • bianchimoonbianchimoon Posts: 3,942
    clamp on the top tube. The tube is perfectly strong enough to cope with anything you would normally do.
    +1, i clamp top tube with soft cloth roi=und grip no problem at all to carbon bike
    All lies and jest..still a man hears what he wants to hear and disregards the rest....
  • ScrumpleScrumple Posts: 3,137
    I have an ISP

    Problems problems
  • antflyantfly Posts: 3,448
    This is all you need, no clamping worries.
    http://www.cyclestore.co.uk/productDeta ... goryID=306
    Smarter than the average bear.
  • Monty DogMonty Dog Posts: 20,614
    ^ hey! a turbo-less turbo-trainer. Actually the best is the likes of a Tacx Spider Team - used by a lot of pro mechanics
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • Berk BonebonceBerk Bonebonce Posts: 1,245
    Just what is the problem with bending over? I mean, not as if we are pro mechanics and mess with bikes all day and night. Put anything carbon in a clamp and get trouble.
  • twotyredtwotyred Posts: 822
    Put anything carbon in a clamp and get trouble.

    Don't know about that. For example I'd be happier clamping a carbon top tube than an alloy Cannondale top tube with the thickness of a coke can.

    My carbon bike has a carbon aero seat post so swapping to an alloy is not an option. So far I've had no problems clamping it by the seat post with my Minoura work stand- carbon composite isn't made of cheese.
  • paul64paul64 Posts: 278
    Monty Dog wrote:
    ^ hey! a turbo-less turbo-trainer. Actually the best is the likes of a Tacx Spider Team - used by a lot of pro mechanics
    Yup, gets my vote. I keep a heavier duty stand for the MTB and a Tacx Spider Team for the carbon road bikes.

    Mattsaw, here's a pic of one (you odn't have to remove the rear wheel, I was giving the bike a complete clean)

    tacxspider3050.jpg

    The top swivels/locks so really easy to turn the bike round leaving the base where it is. The top pulls out and the legs fold giving you two easy pieces for storage.
  • TMRTMR Posts: 3,986
    Monty Dog wrote:
    Actually the best is the likes of a Tacx Spider Team - used by a lot of pro mechanics

    I bought one this week. Used it yesterday, it's great, and well worth the price.
  • paul64paul64 Posts: 278
    So what did you buy Matt(saw)?
  • Berk BonebonceBerk Bonebonce Posts: 1,245
    twotyred wrote:
    Put anything carbon in a clamp and get trouble.

    Don't know about that. For example I'd be happier clamping a carbon top tube than an alloy Cannondale top tube with the thickness of a coke can..

    I remember the aluminium Klein's. You could dink the top tube in with your thumb but the material would not permemently deform. Assuming your Cannondale was T6 treated 7005 aluminium it would have an elongation of about 10% making it considerably more ductile than carbon fibre, despite its lower tensile strength. I'd much rather put an aluminium top tube in a clamp than a CF one.
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