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How am I still 16st?

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  • InitialisedInitialised Posts: 3,047
    I dropped to 15 (from 18ish) over two years in the saddle. Now I seem to have plateaued and am struggling to lose more. Part of me says it's your natural weight but the other bit know's I'm still a fat lady garden because I still often eat too much and eat badly.
    I used to just ride my bike to work but now I find myself going out looking for bigger and bigger hills.
  • This thread makes me feel great. I'm mid-40's but and have only moved from a 30 to a 32" waist over the last 25 years, and I seem to be a positive flyweight compared to other posters here being at 11stone 9lb (about 75kg). I can certainly climb faster than my mate! But.. I would like to get down to about 11st5lb ish agin this year which I managed last year
  • Wallace1492Wallace1492 Posts: 3,707
    I am mid 40's too and made 11st 5 last year.... probably for the first time since in my 20's, wanting to get 11st this year, should be achieviable. Hills are your friend, be they on road bike, mountain bike or walking/running.
    "Encyclopaedia is a fetish for very small bicycles"
  • sampras38sampras38 Posts: 1,917
    I dropped to 15 (from 18ish) over two years in the saddle. Now I seem to have plateaued and am struggling to lose more. Part of me says it's your natural weight but the other bit know's I'm still a fat lady garden because I still often eat too much and eat badly.

    I mean this with every good intention but when you're massively overweight and then start any kind of weight reduction programme you will usually start out by losing a lot of weight quickly. Once you get closer to your normal weight it starts to get increasingly more difficult to shift the weight. It's then when you really have to be strict and monitor your calorie intake a lot more closely.

    It's when the hard work and discipline really starts.
  • InitialisedInitialised Posts: 3,047
    So I've noticed.
    I used to just ride my bike to work but now I find myself going out looking for bigger and bigger hills.
  • AguilaAguila Posts: 622
    Zingzang wrote:
    Aguila wrote:
    Rolf F wrote:
    Metabolism probably. I weigh next to nothing. I spent most of last year eating probably twice what I ate before and my weight changed by approximately nothing. Even putting on muscle doesn't change my weight which seems like it ought to be impossible!

    There are three things in life that are certain - death, taxes and the fact that my weight is a constant......

    This is definitely not true. If you look at studies of basal meabolic rate, people with obesity are consistently shown to have higher BMR than those who are normal or slim.

    Weight loss is actually a very simple matter: Less energy in than you expend and you will definitely lose weight, impossible for anything else to happen. This is simple thermodynamics, you cannot create energy out of nothing.

    Consume more energy than you expend and you will gain weight.

    Not sure what studies you've looked at, but there are clearly some you haven't.

    Certain people with abnormalities of the Hypothalamus are known to have significantly slower metabolisms than other people, and in the majority of cases people with such abnormalities are obese.

    You have clearly not heard of Prader-Willi syndrome.

    And you are not taking into account the influence of many types of medication on metabolism.

    Sure there are some people with slow metabolism, however those with obesity do often have higher BMR than normal controls.

    Actually I have heard of Prader Willi, it's a condition where individuals compulsively eat, it's not due to changes in BMR at all.

    Drugs on the whole (possible exceptions like thyroxine) actually increase appetitie to cause changes in weight.
  • mudcow007mudcow007 Posts: 3,861
    i feel your pain

    im 17 stone, been commuting on my bike since january an steadily getting faster on the bike. i am now eating less then when i first started cycling but have remained exatly the same weight

    my daily commute is about 6 miles each way when i first started it was taking me 40 mins an i would arrive a gasping sweaty mess, its now down to about 18 - 20 mins an not sweaty at all

    i am a big build, always have been...played rugby for my schools etc i dont think im destined to be skinny
    Keeping it classy since '83
  • edhornbyedhornby Posts: 1,780
    one other point to make, it's how you ride your bike that counts as well - the best way to shift fat cells is to be riding at a lower intensity so that the body can metabolise the fat cells rather relying on the glycogen

    way to do this is long rides at a set heart rate

    SCR doesn't help, it's sprints and recovery followed by high tempo intervals ;-)
    "I get paid to make other people suffer on my wheel, how good is that"
    --Jens Voight
  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    edhornby wrote:
    one other point to make, it's how you ride your bike that counts as well - the best way to shift fat cells is to be riding at a lower intensity so that the body can metabolise the fat cells rather relying on the glycogen

    way to do this is long rides at a set heart rate

    SCR doesn't help, it's sprints and recovery followed by high tempo intervals ;-)

    But surely during any bike ride, including the commute, you will be riding at the fat burning, 75% level some of the time. At other times at lower intensity and sometimes higher....
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  • lost_in_thoughtlost_in_thought Posts: 10,563
    motdoc wrote:
    Basically it's a balance of in versus out. A few tips to help are
    1) Food diary.
    2) Weighing scales, weigh yourself every week and put in a chart.
    3) You must eat breakfast.
    4) Snacks must be fruit.

    If you're not loosing weight calories in = calories out. In order to change this you can do more exercise or take less in (or best of all both).

    People tend to loose more weight jogging but they also get injured more. You can do a lot more volume cycling without damaging yourself. 1/2 hr jogging > 1/2 hr cycling in terms of calories.

    Good luck!

    You can't really alter your basal metabolic rate (at least not by much) some people as simply lucky like that.

    Bolded bit is really working for me - I had some advice about it, and have started having porridge or other good carbs for breakfast every morning without fail. I've also stopped weighing and started measuring (would you rather be a 15st size 12 or a 10st size 18 etc) - 3" off my waist since the 1st of Jan!
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,748
    Mid 40's, I was never over 12 stone until 40, then crept up to nearly 13, since starting commuting by bike I am usually around 12 stone (give or take a pound or 2), I've also dropped back to a 32" waist from the 34" I was at (even when just over 12stone but less healthy).

    I can eat like a horse (My best effort was putting on 8pounds in 7 days on a business trip), I always used to get away with it, now I'm getting older I need to be more careful what I eat!

    LiT makes a good point though, its not what the scales say, but how you 'look' that counts, heavy and slim is better than light and flabby!

    Simon
  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    I'm very happy to say that at age 38 I still don't have to be careful. I eat like a horse and my weight barely fluctuates from 80kg (12.5 st). I'm about 6'3". I do eat pretty healthily though, mostly piles of fruit, veg, wholewheat products, pulses, low fat natural yogurt etc etc....
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  • sampras38sampras38 Posts: 1,917
    edited April 2011
    I'm very happy to say that at age 38 I still don't have to be careful. I eat like a horse and my weight barely fluctuates from 80kg (12.5 st). I'm about 6'3". I do eat pretty healthily though, mostly piles of fruit, veg, wholewheat products, pulses, low fat natural yogurt etc etc....

    Similar weight to me although I'm about 3 inches shorter than you and 2 years older. Had a bodybuilding and tennis past and was always pretty muscular and lean, but the last few years of more serious cycling I've come down to about 79/80k from about 96/98kg at my heaviest. A total transformation. Lightest I've been was 77kg last year when riding in the Alps.
  • FrankMFrankM Posts: 129
    I went from cycling just over 10 miles a day to just over 24 miles in January 2010. I had a mountain bike race in June weighed 100kgs and thought it would help me lose weight. The first month I lost about 4 kgs. Then I stagnated. Over the Summer (unfortunately this was after my race) I stopped commuting on one day a week and instead went out once at the weekend 3 hours/50 miles. My weight started falling off again and I went down to 91 kgs within a month of doing so.

    So my tip is this - commuting only gets you so far. In my experience, if you want to lose weight you have to cycle for longer and further than you would on a commute (even if that commute is 12 miles each way).

    Someone else mentioned it already, but I once read an article a long time ago (so the detail might be a bit hazy) but the gist of it was that calories are not equal. They referred to an experiment in which a group of people had a calorie controlled diet. But for the last 200 calories, half the group had to eat dried fruit and nuts whilst the others could eat whatever they wanted. The first group lost more weight.

    Make of that what you will.
  • ProfPingProfPing Posts: 25
    Personal experience (from the last 5 mths) has taught me that I have to got out min 3 times a week at night and do AT LEAST 90 mins fast riding.

    I was 16 st+ (103.5Kg) when I started in October and am now at 13st (82.5Kg). I have also had to watch what I was eating for the last 5 months and took my calorie in take down to < 2K cals a day.

    I set myself a target when I started of 85Kg and told myself I could have a new bike if I hit it. New bike is now inthe garage! :o))
  • ProfPingProfPing Posts: 25
    Also, get yourself a training partner. It is very easy, if you are going out by yourself, to miss a ride but if you have agreed to meet with someone you are less likely to miss the ride as you won't want to let the other person down at the last minute.
  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    sampras38 wrote:
    I'm very happy to say that at age 38 I still don't have to be careful. I eat like a horse and my weight barely fluctuates from 80kg (12.5 st). I'm about 6'3". I do eat pretty healthily though, mostly piles of fruit, veg, wholewheat products, pulses, low fat natural yogurt etc etc....

    Similar weight to me although I'm about 3 inches shorter than you and 2 years older. Had a bodybuilding and tennis past and was always pretty muscular and lean, but the last few years of more serious cycling I've come down to about 79/80k from about 96/98kg at my heaviest. A total transformation. Lightest I've been was 77kg last year when riding in the Alps.

    Yeah I went down to about 73kg at 1 point about 6 or 7 years ago, but since then I have joined a gym and do weights and assume (hope) that the increase in weight is down to muscle growth. Having said that, as I mentioned I have been locked at 80kg for several years now, so even though I do weights at the gym 3x per week I'm not gaining size or weight...
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  • antikytheraantikythera Posts: 326
    Unless you've won the biological lottery...

    You can't manage what you don't measure..

    I tried lots of strategies, saw all sorts of professionals in the end this advice was the one thing that worked.[/b]
  • sampras38sampras38 Posts: 1,917
    sampras38 wrote:
    I'm very happy to say that at age 38 I still don't have to be careful. I eat like a horse and my weight barely fluctuates from 80kg (12.5 st). I'm about 6'3". I do eat pretty healthily though, mostly piles of fruit, veg, wholewheat products, pulses, low fat natural yogurt etc etc....

    Similar weight to me although I'm about 3 inches shorter than you and 2 years older. Had a bodybuilding and tennis past and was always pretty muscular and lean, but the last few years of more serious cycling I've come down to about 79/80k from about 96/98kg at my heaviest. A total transformation. Lightest I've been was 77kg last year when riding in the Alps.

    Yeah I went down to about 73kg at 1 point about 6 or 7 years ago, but since then I have joined a gym and do weights and assume (hope) that the increase in weight is down to muscle growth. Having said that, as I mentioned I have been locked at 80kg for several years now, so even though I do weights at the gym 3x per week I'm not gaining size or weight...

    I don't want to lose anymore weight, at least no more than say 3 or 4 lb for another Alps trip I've got in June. I never wanted to be a traditional cycling build, at least not the really skinny waif look. I'm lean as it is and my stomach muscles are pretty clear. Very happy with my size now tbh.
  • Kieran_BurnsKieran_Burns Posts: 10,052
    I really think I ought to quote Arnold Rimmer at this junction:
    When you're younger you can eat what you like, drink what you like, and still climb into your 26" waist trousers and zip them closed. Then you reach that age, 24-25, your muscles give up, they wave a little white flag, and without any warning at all you're suddenly a fat censored

    These are wise words.
    Chunky Cyclists need your love too! :-)
    2009 Specialized Tricross Sport
    2011 Trek Madone 4.5
    2012 Felt F65X
    Proud CX Pervert and quiet roadie. 12 mile commuter
  • stuaffstuaff Posts: 1,735

    Bolded bit is really working for me - I had some advice about it, and have started having porridge or other good carbs for breakfast every morning without fail. I've also stopped weighing and started measuring (would you rather be a 15st size 12 or a 10st size 18 etc) - 3" off my waist since the 1st of Jan!

    Bravo!

    If anyone's got any spare inches they'd like to donate to my thighs, calves and arms, please feel free. As those of you who've seen me eat will testify, despite my waif-like appearance (60kg or thereabouts...), I'm firmly in the 'eat like a rather peckish horse yet somehow put on no weight whatsoever' bracket. I generally eat fairly sensibly, five a day, not too much fat, etc, and I'm certainly in better shape than I was before I got back into 'serious' cycling (doing 59 miles on the day of the 2008 IOW Randonnee left me aching for a couple of days, now consecutive centuries aren't a problem), and I think my legs have just a fraction more bulk and tone these days. But otherwise, it's still like my metabolism is a black hole....
    Dahon Speed Pro TT; Trek Portland
    Viner Magnifica '08 ; Condor Squadra
    LeJOG in aid of the Royal British Legion. Please sponsor me at http://www.bmycharity.com/stuaffleck2011
  • SketchleySketchley Posts: 4,235
    Consume less engery (calories) than you burn / excrete = weight loss simple really. Energy = Mass (x C squared) and you cannot change the law of physics Captain. How, when and what to consume and how, when and what to burn are mearly bystanders in the equation. They may help with rate of calories burn or where the weight is lost from and what weight is lost (muscle v fat etc) but that is all.

    Works the other way too, consume more than you burn / excrete = weight gain laws of physics again.

    Now I have this in my head http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FCARADb9asE
    --
    Chris

    Genesis Equilibrium - FCN 3/4/5
  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    sampras38 wrote:
    sampras38 wrote:
    I'm very happy to say that at age 38 I still don't have to be careful. I eat like a horse and my weight barely fluctuates from 80kg (12.5 st). I'm about 6'3". I do eat pretty healthily though, mostly piles of fruit, veg, wholewheat products, pulses, low fat natural yogurt etc etc....

    Similar weight to me although I'm about 3 inches shorter than you and 2 years older. Had a bodybuilding and tennis past and was always pretty muscular and lean, but the last few years of more serious cycling I've come down to about 79/80k from about 96/98kg at my heaviest. A total transformation. Lightest I've been was 77kg last year when riding in the Alps.

    Yeah I went down to about 73kg at 1 point about 6 or 7 years ago, but since then I have joined a gym and do weights and assume (hope) that the increase in weight is down to muscle growth. Having said that, as I mentioned I have been locked at 80kg for several years now, so even though I do weights at the gym 3x per week I'm not gaining size or weight...

    I don't want to lose anymore weight, at least no more than say 3 or 4 lb for another Alps trip I've got in June. I never wanted to be a traditional cycling build, at least not the really skinny waif look. I'm lean as it is and my stomach muscles are pretty clear. Very happy with my size now tbh.

    No, I want to maintain my weight but perhaps get some more definition! I'm trying to strengthen my core muscles though, because I'm tall I'm susceptible to back problems and want to avoid them....
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  • Butterd2Butterd2 Posts: 937
    pastryboy wrote:
    Cycling really isn't that fantastic for weight loss I'm afraid. If you want to lose weight take up jogging.

    I think it depends on the type of cycling. 2 x 30min sprints everyday on the commute are anaerobic thus burn carbs and produce lactic. Result no weight loss.

    I lost a lot of weight last year preping for the Pyrenees but this was from doing 4+ hour rides at an aerobic intensity where you body can burn fat fast enough to keep up.
    Scott CR-1 (FCN 4)
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  • andyjrandyjr Posts: 638
    For me personally, at the start of the year I wanted to generally get fitter again after some injury issues & start doing triathlons. Losing weight was a good starting point, So I picked up the amount of training I was doing again. So far have knocked 5 kgs off which is not bad. Cycling wise I have done a bit but not loads yet, but I plan to start commuting to work twice a week starting in a couple of weeks to try and help this further; 27 miles 1 way so with a bit of luck I will hopefully notice changes after a few weeks. Just doing cycling alone will only get you so far as your always working the same muscle groups. Variety of exercise helps as your not targetting specific areas. Food wise I eat only at meal times & have cut out 95% of the snacks aswell.

    My brother in comparison to me eats very poorly- lack of fruit & veg & toomuch rubbish but he weighs only about 68 kg basically as he does so much running that he burns everything off
  • sampras38sampras38 Posts: 1,917
    I just think a lot of cyclists eat too much, thinking it's ok because they spend a lot of time on the bike. I guess it just boils down to how serious you are or what your goals are. Some people aren't fussed about carrying a few extra pounds and others are obsessed about being skinny.

    I must admit though, I have often been suprised about how chunky some supposed experienced riders are. You only have to look at the photos from a sportive like the Wales Dragon. You'd think that most people entering something like that would want to get into some kind of decent shape beforehand, but the amount of porkers you see is incredible. WTF are these people eating I'll never know..;-)
  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    sampras38 wrote:
    I just think a lot of cyclists eat too much, thinking it's ok because they spend a lot of time on the bike. I guess it just boils down to how serious you are or what your goals are. Some people aren't fussed about carrying a few extra pounds and others are obsessed about being skinny.

    I must admit though, I have often been suprised about how chunky some supposed experienced riders are. You only have to look at the photos from a sportive like the Wales Dragon. You'd think that most people entering something like that would want to get into some kind of decent shape beforehand, but the amount of porkers you see is incredible. WTF are these people eating I'll never know..;-)

    Yeah but sportives are hardly top competition events, they're designed as guided cycle rides and are not meant to be competitive, in fact when you enter some events they specify that anyone caught "racing" will be disqualified... if you want to see race whippets go to watch proper cycle race events!
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  • sampras38sampras38 Posts: 1,917
    sampras38 wrote:
    I just think a lot of cyclists eat too much, thinking it's ok because they spend a lot of time on the bike. I guess it just boils down to how serious you are or what your goals are. Some people aren't fussed about carrying a few extra pounds and others are obsessed about being skinny.

    I must admit though, I have often been suprised about how chunky some supposed experienced riders are. You only have to look at the photos from a sportive like the Wales Dragon. You'd think that most people entering something like that would want to get into some kind of decent shape beforehand, but the amount of porkers you see is incredible. WTF are these people eating I'll never know..;-)

    Yeah but sportives are hardly top competition events, they're designed as guided cycle rides and are not meant to be competitive, in fact when you enter some events they specify that anyone caught "racing" will be disqualified... if you want to see race whippets go to watch proper cycle race events!

    That's not what I meant.

    I'm not desperate to see skinny cyclists, I'm just suprised how out of shape a lot of club cyclists are.
  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    sampras38 wrote:
    sampras38 wrote:
    I just think a lot of cyclists eat too much, thinking it's ok because they spend a lot of time on the bike. I guess it just boils down to how serious you are or what your goals are. Some people aren't fussed about carrying a few extra pounds and others are obsessed about being skinny.

    I must admit though, I have often been suprised about how chunky some supposed experienced riders are. You only have to look at the photos from a sportive like the Wales Dragon. You'd think that most people entering something like that would want to get into some kind of decent shape beforehand, but the amount of porkers you see is incredible. WTF are these people eating I'll never know..;-)

    Yeah but sportives are hardly top competition events, they're designed as guided cycle rides and are not meant to be competitive, in fact when you enter some events they specify that anyone caught "racing" will be disqualified... if you want to see race whippets go to watch proper cycle race events!

    That's not what I meant.

    But what I was trying to say was that you're likely to get a good cross section of riders in a sportive, from more competitive race types who do regular club runs to steadier, more portly touring type riders who tend to do rides for the pubs along the way rather than the fitness building. They may well be very experienced cyclists yet slightly overweight for reasons we have discussed...
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  • ZingzangZingzang Posts: 196
    Aguila wrote:
    Zingzang wrote:
    Aguila wrote:
    Rolf F wrote:
    Metabolism probably. I weigh next to nothing. I spent most of last year eating probably twice what I ate before and my weight changed by approximately nothing. Even putting on muscle doesn't change my weight which seems like it ought to be impossible!

    There are three things in life that are certain - death, taxes and the fact that my weight is a constant......

    This is definitely not true. If you look at studies of basal meabolic rate, people with obesity are consistently shown to have higher BMR than those who are normal or slim.

    Weight loss is actually a very simple matter: Less energy in than you expend and you will definitely lose weight, impossible for anything else to happen. This is simple thermodynamics, you cannot create energy out of nothing.

    Consume more energy than you expend and you will gain weight.

    Not sure what studies you've looked at, but there are clearly some you haven't.

    Certain people with abnormalities of the Hypothalamus are known to have significantly slower metabolisms than other people, and in the majority of cases people with such abnormalities are obese.

    You have clearly not heard of Prader-Willi syndrome.

    And you are not taking into account the influence of many types of medication on metabolism.

    Sure there are some people with slow metabolism, however those with obesity do often have higher BMR than normal controls.

    Actually I have heard of Prader Willi, it's a condition where individuals compulsively eat, it's not due to changes in BMR at all.

    Drugs on the whole (possible exceptions like thyroxine) actually increase appetitie to cause changes in weight.

    Funny kind of reasoning about Prader Willi. Not sure how you interpreted my bare mention of the condition as implying that it is actually due to a change in BMR.

    Also, you clearly have a somewhat superficial view of things if you can describe PW as a "condition where individuals compulsively eat". There is a whole lot more to it than that.

    Lastly, your discussion of the effect of drugs merely confirms my point rather than undermines it.
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