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Bike for rowing training

citruscitrus Posts: 60
edited March 2011 in Road beginners
Hi guys,

Im interested in buying a bike as a means of training for rowing.

As its being used for training, Im not so fussed about it being particularly light weight or anything fancy like that, I more just want it to be comfortable for up to 100km rides.

I went into my nearest evans, and was recommended (and tried out) a Cannondale CAAD8, the cheapest one with a Sora groupset. Is this a good choice in your opinion?

My budget is up to around the £700 mark, I could stretch a little, but would rather spend the extra money on a set of clipless pedals and shoes.

Thanks for any advice in advance

Posts

  • Obvious question out of the way time.

    Rowing machine?
  • Phil_DPhil_D Posts: 467
    Can you get one of those exercise bikes where the handlebars go forward and back and somehow modify it so it goes on the road?
  • verlorenverloren Posts: 337
    You can get a used Concept2 rower for that much (they're built tough, so no problem getting a used one), and while cycling is a wonderful activity, the rowing machine will be better training for rowing.

    '09 Enigma Eclipse with SRAM.
    '10 Tifosi CK7 Audax Classic with assorted bits for the wet weather
    '08 Boardman Hybrid Comp for the very wet weather.
  • citruscitrus Posts: 60
    Yes I know rowing machines are obviously better training, but I train 10 times a week and Im looking to buy a bike to use for cross training.

    Especially for the long distance stuff, do you have any idea how boring it is sitting on a rowing machine for 2 hours? :wink:

    Im still planning to keep up my regular training, just put in two medium/long bike rides in per week.
  • verlorenverloren Posts: 337
    My longest row is 3.75 hours (for a very slow marathon), so yes, I do :)

    '09 Enigma Eclipse with SRAM.
    '10 Tifosi CK7 Audax Classic with assorted bits for the wet weather
    '08 Boardman Hybrid Comp for the very wet weather.
  • re-cyclesre-cycles Posts: 107
    How about a hand cycle? Surely that'd be more beneficial?
  • mattshropsmattshrops Posts: 1,158
    re-cycles wrote:
    How about a hand cycle? Surely that'd be more beneficial?

    is that what theyre calling it these days :shock:
    Death or Glory- Just another Story
  • springtide9springtide9 Posts: 1,731
    Cycling will help with your fitness. I use the C2 for helping with the cycling!

    Take a look at:
    http://www.bikeradar.com/gear/article/b ... 1000-29719

    Lots of reviews on BR. Might also be worth looking for a last years 'discounted' model. The last bike was around £700. It is also important to make sure you get the right size.
    Simon
  • weaponsweapons Posts: 367
    I think cycling will help no end. I am a former club rower, now racing on the bike and doing an equivalent volume of training on the bike as I did as a rower so c.12hrs or so per week. I still do a cross training session per week on the C2 and my erg splits are better for longer pieces than when I specifically trained as a rower, as the legs are stronger. That said, i am a lot slower in my sculling boat than I used to be....
  • Omar LittleOmar Little Posts: 2,040
    Is it not the case that Team GB does alot of training on bikes during the off season? There were a few members (not just the older guys like James Cracknell etc) at the Etape Caledonia last year and they were pretty fast.

    The CAAD8 will be a good bike, if you look around you might be able to get last years mid range version with tiagra (one up from sora) for about £700.
  • weaponsweapons Posts: 367
    Is it not the case that Team GB does alot of training on bikes during the off season? There were a few members (not just the older guys like James Cracknell etc) at the Etape Caledonia last year and they were pretty fast.

    The CAAD8 will be a good bike, if you look around you might be able to get last years mid range version with tiagra (one up from sora) for about £700.

    Yes, GB rowing does having cycling training camps:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/annabelverno ... _camp.html
  • citruscitrus Posts: 60
    Thanks for all the replies!

    Im set on getting a bike, I know it will be good for me, thanks to all the people agreeing!

    I am interested in last years models, the price of a CAAD 8 2010 was what got me interested in it in the first place, but Im quite big (6 foot 5 ish) and they dont seem to have many large frames left.
  • mattshropsmattshrops Posts: 1,158
    you might find you get bored with that silly messing about in a boat malarkey :D

    step into the light citrus step into the light... 8)
    Death or Glory- Just another Story
  • pbt150pbt150 Posts: 338
    Citrus - I take it you're not a lightweight if you're 6ft 5! At a guess you're ~95kg? The bike you listed is a really good entry level setup and it sounds like you're getting a decent deal. The one thing to look out for really is the wheels - look for a higher spoke count, or put a couple of hundred quid aside to get a strong pair built for you if you have any problems with the stock ones.
  • mattshropsmattshrops Posts: 1,158
    pbt150 wrote:
    ...or buy a row-bike...

    http://www.rowbike.com/

    wow thats road rash waiting to happen :shock:
    Death or Glory- Just another Story
  • citruscitrus Posts: 60
    mattshrops wrote:
    you might find you get bored with that silly messing about in a boat malarkey :D

    step into the light citrus step into the light... 8)

    Haha we'll see how I get on!
    pbt150 wrote:
    I take it you're not a lightweight

    No, I am quite big, all be it not quite 95kg.

    Does this mean anything though or will I be fine on most bikes? Upgrading the wheels is something that seems quite a good idea from reading this and other forums.
  • NerrepNerrep Posts: 112
    As an ex 95kg rower, and a current 95kg fatty, I've been fine on the cheap, paired spoke wheels that came with my bike -- I wouldn't worry about it; just enjoy not being on the ergo!
  • I've heard a lot of people complain about the Sora shifters, and I was less than impressed with them on my brother in laws bike. If you're planning to do a lot of miles see if you can stretch to getting a bike with at least the Tiagra shifters without the nasty thumb shifter. Don't be put off thumb shifters in general - the Campagnolo ones are very comfy to use, just the Sora ones are poor
    Has the head wind picked up or the tail wind dropped off???
  • citruscitrus Posts: 60
    If I upgrade to a Tiagra fitted bike though, thats a couple hundred pounds more to spend which is money that I would rather spend on shoes and pedals or to upgrade the wheels.

    Does that not sound like a better idea?
  • pbt150pbt150 Posts: 338
    citrus wrote:
    If I upgrade to a Tiagra fitted bike though, thats a couple hundred pounds more to spend which is money that I would rather spend on shoes and pedals or to upgrade the wheels.

    Does that not sound like a better idea?

    I've been using Sora for years. If you get it set up properly it works really well, so unless you can get a great deal on a bike with Tiagra I wouldn't bother with the upgrade.

    IMO you'd be better off with proper shoes/pedals/shorts (don't cycle long distances in your rowing lycra, padded shorts are much better) than a slightly more expensive groupset that essentially does the same job.
  • It's completely your decision, all I'm commenting on is that most people don't like the Sora shift - if you're happy with it then go ahead and get it. Though I would say getting a Tiagra equiped machine is not a massive hike up, just looking around the Evans site comes up with this for a little more

    http://www.evanscycles.com/products/gt/ ... e-ec020907

    Just trying to help out - hope you get a bike you really enjoy riding :)
    Has the head wind picked up or the tail wind dropped off???
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