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Do people ajust, rebound or not?

blablablacksheepblablablacksheep Posts: 1,627
edited April 2011 in MTB beginners
Just wondering do people actually bother to ajust rebound now-a-days?

Never seen anyone suggest or advice to chance the rebound, most people say keep it as it came with bike, ie" hare"

personally my fork, tora 302sl 100mm it was set to default "hare" tbh i havnt changed it at all, should i put it more "tortoise"?

just wondered as most sites/guides say keep it on defualt setting/"hare"

what you guys have yours on?

Do you change the rebound ajust? 0 votes

Never really bothered with it, still set on default
0% 0 votes
of course, i spent ages getting the rebound set-up perfectly
0% 0 votes
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  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,904
    Didn't answer the poll, as no option for set up for conditions. Too fast (low damping) rebound and you'll bounce, too slow (high damping) and the forks will compress over a series of bumps as they won't return to full travel between bumps.
    I don't do smileys.

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  • stubsstubs Posts: 5,258
    Work out where your rebound is set ie how many clicks or turns from fully open. Make a note then try some different settings alter things a click or turn at a time and try riding same short section of trail till you find something that feels good. I set my suspension by riding down a flight of 30 steps off a railway bridge. If I can get to the bottom without touching the brakes or landing on my head I know its nearly right.
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  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,904
    @stubs Excellent test, but would like to see some video of the failed attempts.
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  • SquarepantsSquarepants Posts: 1,019
    I adjust them when I remember to; which isn't that often. .

    I tend to leave my RP2 well alone as the pro pedal seems to do the trick depending on conditions. I adjusted my recons on the last ride - it may have made a difference but I was too knackered to notice..
    Cube Hanzz Pro FR
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  • Daz555Daz555 Posts: 4,040
    Set it once. It felt about right. Still feels about right now so have not touched in since.
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  • edhornbyedhornby Posts: 1,780
    wouldn't the length of the fork make a difference as well? a 120 or more would indicate you're more of a jumper and hence a slower rebound, but a 100 or 80mm would make you more of a line picker and benefitting from a quicker rebound?

    I'm firmly in the 'as it came out of the shop' camp
    "I get paid to make other people suffer on my wheel, how good is that"
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  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,904
    Nope. Should be adjusted for the individula- weight, conditions, style etc.
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  • TuckerUKTuckerUK Posts: 398
    Apart from an initial set up which might include a change of oil weight I dial mine in at the start of most rides if the temperature is much different from the last ride as the damping oils viscosity (and therefore damping ability) changes with temperature. Of course if you don't have oil forks this might not be a concern.
    "Coming through..."
  • stubsstubs Posts: 5,258
    cooldad wrote:
    @stubs Excellent test, but would like to see some video of the failed attempts.

    I have never failed to get to the bottom. :wink: occasionally I have failed to get to the bottom whilst still attached to the bike

    You dont need a video of me just imagine pushing a wheelie bin down some steps :lol:
    Fig rolls: proof that god loves cyclists and that she wants us to do another lap
  • whats wied is after reading my forks manual for tora it says "suggest leaving the forks rebound on the default settings as changing can cause adverse affects " lol

    i left mine on rabbit setting and havnt changed it at all, tbh cant see the point given nothin bad has happened with it on the full rabbit...though i think higher quality forks probally react a lot more so probally need change..

    do you really change though before every ride or type of stuff you going to ride? seems overkill ,
    London2Brighton Challange 100k!
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  • paulboxpaulbox Posts: 1,187
    Daz555 wrote:
    Set it once. It felt about right. Still feels about right now so have not touched in since.
    This.
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  • No, initial setup seems fine - if I meddle I'll probably make it worse and wont be able to get it right again :lol:
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 28,799
    Just wondering do people actually bother to ajust rebound now-a-days?
    Those who care about it do. Those who don't care, don't. Same as always.
    And there will always be lots of people either totally not understanding what it does, or adjusting it the wrong way.
  • Clark3yClark3y Posts: 129
    Why would you set it to fully open? Might as well get a fork with no damping in that case, save weight ;)

    I use a fairly high setting, no silly pogo stick business, no packing down, just superb front end grip.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 28,799
    do you really change though before every ride or type of stuff you going to ride? seems overkill ,
    Oh hell no. Basically, set it to your spring rate, and weight.
    (then pretty much leave it until one of the two changes noticeably)
  • thel33terthel33ter Posts: 2,684
    I do, I normally get it pretty much perfect, try to get that last little bit, and ruin it :lol: Rebound on my current forks is pretty slow overall, so it gets left about 1/8 turn from full speed (only turns 3/4 of a full rotation)
    And now you know, and knowing is half the battle
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  • TorresTorres Posts: 1,266
    stubs wrote:
    Work out where your rebound is set ie how many clicks or turns from fully open. Make a note then try some different settings alter things a click or turn at a time and try riding same short section of trail till you find something that feels good. I set my suspension by riding down a flight of 30 steps off a railway bridge. If I can get to the
    bottom without touching the brakes or landing on my head I know its nearly right.

    *Wanders off to find lots of steps...*

    I normally just set mine to the middle as soon as i get my forks, then make adjustments one way or the other whilst i'm out on the first ride... however i'm tempted to try stubs method now :D
    What We Achieve In Life, Echoes In Eternity
  • supersonicsupersonic Posts: 82,708 Lives Here
    Just to add to the above, longer travel forks tend to have lower spring rates. This in turn requires a lower rebound damper setting than a higher spring rate for a given level of return speed.

    I like to set my rebound up by riding into a dip or hollow. As you ride into it, the fork extends. As you hit the face of it on the way out, you get a sharp compression. Then it rebounds again. With a bit of farting about you can get it to feel 'right', and track the ground without bogging down or firing back at you.

    Or just ride, and make changes, and see what feels best ;-)
  • joshtpjoshtp Posts: 4,329
    are you serious? how can you ride a fork KNOWING your not getting the most out of it... I cant....

    :?

    I always make sure it's set up right for both the terrain and the conditions, as well as my weight...


    when you know what you want it doesn't take long to get it just right for the conditions... it's worth it... you could have a gold plated platinum fork with diamond internals.... but it's useless unless its set up right...
    I like bikes and stuff
  • theshrewtheshrew Posts: 169
    How are you supposed to set them up ?

    I have looked in my manual but it doesnt tell you how.

    Is there a rule of thumb or do you just adjust settings and see what you like ?
  • joshtpjoshtp Posts: 4,329
    you want the fork to return to full travel quickly ( so it can take another hit) but not so quickly that it jerks your hands of the bars, or is violent in it's return... it needs to come back quickly but smoothly.


    TF Tuned have a video on it somewhere... check youtube.
    I like bikes and stuff
  • theshrewtheshrew Posts: 169
    Cheers :D
  • like he said above, problem that i think most people find is that the forks dont really act that badly when set too high/rabit.

    only the air forks i belive can jump back too hard while the coils are harder to ajust due to being harder to notice if they jumping back to much.
    London2Brighton Challange 100k!
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  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 28,799
    only the air forks i belive can jump back too hard while the coils are harder to ajust due to being harder to notice if they jumping back to much.
    Makes no difference at all. A spring does what a spring does, whether it's air or coil.
  • nwmlargenwmlarge Posts: 863
    i mess about with mine and find for xc'ish stuff slower rebound is nice if there is a lot of censored on the floor

    quick rebound for pumping smooth trails and jumps.
  • diydiy Posts: 6,680
    If I am running +ve high an -ve low (i.e. 10psi apart or more) for AM trails I will slow the rebound down to compensate for the fast return and reduce bounce.

    If I am running the -ve high (either equal to the +ive or slightly higher) for XC trails, I will speed up the rebound so that it keeps it active.

    Never more than +-2 clicks from middle though.

    If you run the fork set fully to fast you run the risk of the front bouncing up on DH drops or small jumps.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 28,799
    nwmlarge wrote:
    i mess about with mine and find for xc'ish stuff slower rebound is nice if there is a lot of censored on the floor

    quick rebound for pumping smooth trails and jumps.
    The more censored there is on the ground for the wheel to track over, the faster the rebound has to be in order to ensure it is re-extending properly between succesive hits. That's what rebound control is there for.
    On a smooth surface, the rebound can be stiffer, since there's more time before the next bump.
  • I don't alter mine and I don't know if I'm getting the most out of it, but I know I'm not having problems, so I leave it. It seems ok to me for whatever I've ridden over.

    I did an uplift day at Cwmcarn a while back and there was a bloke who fell off a couple of times. He was fiddling with his fork setup the whole day because it wasn't right.

    So, I think you'll definitely know about it if it's not setup right, but unless you're really experienced, you wont necessarily know if it's set to it's optimum performance for you. If you get what I mean?!

    If you have to fiddle with it that much, you're either a princess (the one with the pea), bored, or you didn't set it up properly in the first place :wink:

    Just kiddin'
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 28,799
    If you have to fiddle with it that much, you're either a princess (the one with the pea), bored, or you didn't set it up properly in the first place :wink:
    Or you're getting so close to the limit that tiny little tweaks are giving worthwhile 100th of seconds of improvements.
  • oodboooodboo Posts: 2,177
    I set mine fast then rode the bike for a bit (about 2 months) to get used to it. Then I set it slow for a bit (again another couple of months) to see what the difference was. Now I have it a few clicks off slow and it feels just right. You've got to try the different settings in the real world to get to know what they do, only then can you understand the differences and where you need to set it to suit you and your bike.
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