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Came off because my brakes were too good! :-(

unixnerdunixnerd Posts: 2,864
edited February 2011 in The bottom bracket
Been dying to get the road bike out for ages but the weather up here has been horrid so I've been using the tourer or the mtb. So today the roads are almost dry and I can contain myself no longer - a quick 20 miles loop is the order of the day.

All went well until I descended the short but steep hill down to Feshiebridge. To cross the bridge you have to make a sharp left turn and it's always mucky in the middle so you have to do it quit tight. The tourer's brakes have never been it's best feature so normally I just yank on both and it all works out nicely, road bike didn't use to be that much better. But I put on new wheels at the end of last year (Pro-Lite Braccianos, just wonderful) and the new braking surface has put braking into a different league. Result being I put too much into the rear wheel and that combined with a wetish surface meant the wheel locked.

I managed to hold the bike on track with a bit of fishtailing but realised at this point I'm not going to make the turn and am heading for the rather low bridge parapet with a 30" drop onto rocks on the other side. At this point I decide to jump ship and fall over, coming to rest against the parapet.

Luckily I was wearing gloves and longs so all I've got is a minor a bit of rash on my thigh. The road was so covered in grit it must have moved along with me and none of my clothing tore! Bike needs new bar tape but I didn't like the colour anyway. Before the event I had a sore thumb, now I have a much sorer thumb.

Could have been a hell of a lot worse, first time I've come off a road bike since my teens! Think I've also learnt a wee lesson about good brakes needing a bit more caution.
http://www.strathspey.co.uk - Quality Binoculars at a Sensible Price.
Specialized Roubaix SL3 Expert 2012, Cannondale CAAD5,
Marin Mount Vision (1997), Edinburgh Country tourer, 3 cats!

Posts

  • dilemnadilemna Posts: 2,187
    Or ......... to slow down. Sounds like the speed you tried to take the corner was far too fast or you were riding beyond your capabilities or you weren't paying proper attention to the conditions. Oh well at least you got away with only a few cuts and bruises. You'll heel and know better for next time.
    Life is like a roll of toilet paper; long and useful, but always ends at the wrong moment. Anon.
    Think how stupid the average person is.......
    half of them are even more stupid than you first thought.
  • gethmetalgethmetal Posts: 208
    Maybe too much speed, definitely too much back brake.
    Hey ho, glad you're not too badly hurt.
  • What pads are you using?

    I experienced serious brake fade descending Honister with my standard Centaur pads recently!
    Ribble Gran Fondo
    Boardman CX Team
    Trek 8000
    Sirrus framed 'special'

    Prev: Avanti Corsa, Routens, MBK TT, homemade TT bike, Trek 990, Vitus 979 x 2, Peugeot Roubaix & er..Raleigh Arena!
  • unixnerdunixnerd Posts: 2,864
    What pads are you using?

    Not a clue, they came with the bike and I've not had to replace them yet. It wasn't an issue of fade as it's a short hill.

    It's made me realise how much I miss the road bike though, especially with the new wheels it just wants to go faster and faster - sadly the "engine" is sometimes lacking! :-) My tourer is a really great bike but the Cannondale is plain awesome. If my thumb isn't too sore I'll be out again tomorrow.

    With hindsight I should have been a bit more cautious, I've done that road 100s of times as it's my normal training loop. But it's had loads of salt and grit this winter and I think I lost traction partly due to that, but mainly using the rear brake too hard and not being used to it on that bike. I think my tourer's 28mm Schwables may also have a bit more wet grip than the Continental Ultra Sports. I was running around 110 psi on the rear, might lower it a bit and see if I get more grip.
    http://www.strathspey.co.uk - Quality Binoculars at a Sensible Price.
    Specialized Roubaix SL3 Expert 2012, Cannondale CAAD5,
    Marin Mount Vision (1997), Edinburgh Country tourer, 3 cats!
  • YossieYossie Posts: 2,600
    Or ......... to slow down. Sounds like the speed you tried to take the corner was far too fast or you were riding beyond your capabilities or you weren't paying proper attention to the conditions. Oh well at least you got away with only a few cuts and bruises. You'll heel and know better for next time.

    Nice - nothing like a little patronisation to add salt to the wounds - especially the "riding beyone capabilities bit". How very supportive.
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    Harsh but true though ?

    As dilemna says he will know better for next time.
  • YossieYossie Posts: 2,600
    Harsh but true though ? [/i

    No - just patronising.
  • Sometimes when I'm heading for a corner in the wet on my MTB I just pray....only ever had an ice fall though, on a straight road

    disc brakes and bigger contact patch make it easier not to fall though I guess
    Road - '10 Giant Defy 3.5
    MTB - '05 Scott Yecora
    BMX - '04 Haro Nyquist R24 (don't judge me)
  • rakerake Posts: 3,281
    off = bad riding. you pulled the brake :evil:
    dont try and corner hard when its slippery, easy.
  • McBain_v1McBain_v1 Posts: 5,237
    Too many bike crashes in our office, broken clavicle seems to be the order of the day with two roadies kissing the tarmac due to over-enthusiastic descending in marginal conditions. Makes me glad to be a weed when it comes to going downhill - at least I get there in one piece without donating skin to the road :wink:

    What do I ride? Now that's an Enigma!
  • unixnerdunixnerd Posts: 2,864
    Is this it?

    Yes, in somewhat nicer weather :-) Doesn't look as steep on there as in person.
    http://www.strathspey.co.uk - Quality Binoculars at a Sensible Price.
    Specialized Roubaix SL3 Expert 2012, Cannondale CAAD5,
    Marin Mount Vision (1997), Edinburgh Country tourer, 3 cats!
  • http://sheldonbrown.com/brakturn.html

    Back brake is only used if there is something wrong with my front one. Was taught this as a kid.
  • morstarmorstar Posts: 4,342
    I could have sworn this was a forum for bike riders...

    NOT high horse riders.

    How wrong I was.

    Guy makes error of judgement. Guy acknowledges error of judgement and points out mitigating circumstances. Smug people who have never made mistakes point out he made a mistake.
    No sh*t Sherlock
  • unixnerdunixnerd Posts: 2,864
    I was using both brakes because I didn't want to lock the front wheel on a poor surface. What caught me out was how powerful the brakes were on a bike I've barely used in the last 3 months. Judging by the weather forecast any type of cycling is out the question for the next few days up here.
    http://www.strathspey.co.uk - Quality Binoculars at a Sensible Price.
    Specialized Roubaix SL3 Expert 2012, Cannondale CAAD5,
    Marin Mount Vision (1997), Edinburgh Country tourer, 3 cats!
  • geebee2geebee2 Posts: 248
    http://sheldonbrown.com/brakturn.html

    Back brake is only used if there is something wrong with my front one. Was taught this as a kid.

    Obviously you didn't read the link you gave!

    <<
    When to Use The Rear Brake
    Skilled cyclists use the front brake alone probably 95% of the time, but there are instances when the rear brake is preferred:
    Slippery surfaces. On good, dry pavement, unless leaning in a turn, it is impossible to skid the front wheel by braking. On slippery surfaces, however, it is possible. A front wheel skid almost always leads to a fall, so if there is a high risk of skidding, you're better off controlling your speed with the rear brake.
    >>

    On slippery surfaces you need to learn to use the back. But it's a delicate art, and a new set of brakes (or rims) can catch you out easily, as in this case.
  • geebee2 wrote:
    http://sheldonbrown.com/brakturn.html

    Back brake is only used if there is something wrong with my front one. Was taught this as a kid.

    Obviously you didn't read the link you gave!

    <<
    When to Use The Rear Brake
    Skilled cyclists use the front brake alone probably 95% of the time, but there are instances when the rear brake is preferred:
    Slippery surfaces. On good, dry pavement, unless leaning in a turn, it is impossible to skid the front wheel by braking. On slippery surfaces, however, it is possible. A front wheel skid almost always leads to a fall, so if there is a high risk of skidding, you're better off controlling your speed with the rear brake.
    >>

    On slippery surfaces you need to learn to use the back. But it's a delicate art, and a new set of brakes (or rims) can catch you out easily, as in this case.

    Not really, I don't ride in the rain :lol:

    Ok yes I have used the back brake on the odd occasion, am still using the original rear pads so its probably only when I have overestimated my ability :oops:
  • unixnerdunixnerd Posts: 2,864
    Not really, I don't ride in the rain

    I can see you don't live in Scotland :-)
    Ok yes I have used the back brake on the odd occasion, am still using the original rear pads so its probably only when I have overestimated my ability

    I think the fact I'm left handed makes a difference. Having said that I hardly ever use it on my mtb.

    On a different note that link to google streetview got me thinking and I used it to take a wee wander out to Achleum, it's down a side road about 100m before the bridge. You pass the ourdoor centre at Lagganlia and the Feshiebridge glider strip. I've been down there to go hillwalking but never on the bike. Stupid me, what a stunning bike route:
    http://www.livestrong.com/loops/aviemor ... GoqKhmB1RP
    http://www.strathspey.co.uk - Quality Binoculars at a Sensible Price.
    Specialized Roubaix SL3 Expert 2012, Cannondale CAAD5,
    Marin Mount Vision (1997), Edinburgh Country tourer, 3 cats!
  • geebee2geebee2 Posts: 248
    I've been down there to go hillwalking but never on the bike

    Brings back very fond memories for me. About 30 years ago I caught the train up to Aviemore, hiked into the Cairngorms and then across to Ben Nevis, finally caught a coach back to London from Fort William (about 7 days back-packing). I remember a very long day walking across the Cairngorm plateau, I was very tired when I reached Glen Feshie and camped there.

    Well, obviously a great place for cycling, but around Gloucester where I live now is great too - Forest of Dean and the Cotswolds provide great variety.
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