Setting up raceblades

rodgers73
rodgers73 Posts: 2,626
edited February 2011 in Road beginners
I've struggled with mine for an hour or so in a freezing garage and have just about got the rear one sorted. Only problem is it's sitting about 2 inches back from the brake.

Will this gap let crap spray up my back still, or is it not a problem?

Cheers

Comments

  • crankycrank
    crankycrank Posts: 1,830
    To get closer to the brake just slide the mounts up on the seatstays and lower the mudguard on it's stays to the proper height. And yes, you're better off with less gap between the brake and guard.
  • rodgers73
    rodgers73 Posts: 2,626
    Sadly these require bending to fit rather than having adjustable stays!
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    To set up raceblades-

    1. Get eBay account
    2. Sell raceblades on eBay.
    3. Buy Crud Roadracer mk2s.
    4. If Cruds won't fit buy either Mudguard Compatible frame or another frame that will take Cruds.
  • woodywmb
    woodywmb Posts: 669
    Zefal Shield Snap-On Mudguard. Similar to Race Blades but you can cut the stays and plug the ends with plastic caps provided.
  • seanoconn
    seanoconn Posts: 11,513
    With raceblades you adjust the metal frame to get a better fit to the wheel by sliding the plastic part of frame which is attached to the mudguard, either further apart or closer together. You can also slide the mudgard up and down the frame. It might seem stiff at first but does move.
    Pinno, מלך אידיוט וחרא מכונאי
  • rodgers73
    rodgers73 Posts: 2,626
    seanoconn wrote:
    With raceblades you adjust the metal frame to get a better fit to the wheel by sliding the plastic part of frame which is attached to the mudguard, either further apart or closer together. You can also slide the mudgard up and down the frame. It might seem stiff at first but does move.

    Thank you! That's worked a treat.

    Cheers
  • peejay78
    peejay78 Posts: 3,378
    raceblades are a total pain in the harass.

    they get loose and spray everywhere, like an incontinent child.

    they also dump all the slime from the roads on your back brake. and your feet get a drenching. and they spray the other members of the clubrun.

    they do keep your rear end dry, which is quite important.
  • rodgers73
    rodgers73 Posts: 2,626
    The latter is most important to me. I have Smart lights which will pack up if they get wet :D
  • peejay78
    peejay78 Posts: 3,378
    they're not very 'smart' then.

    ;)
  • rodgers73
    rodgers73 Posts: 2,626
    They're "crap" in the wet :D
  • seanoconn
    seanoconn Posts: 11,513
    rodgers73 wrote:
    seanoconn wrote:
    With raceblades you adjust the metal frame to get a better fit to the wheel by sliding the plastic part of frame which is attached to the mudguard, either further apart or closer together. You can also slide the mudgard up and down the frame. It might seem stiff at first but does move.

    Thank you! That's worked a treat.

    Cheers

    No problem.

    Took me ages to figure it out first time. I even tried bending the frame.

    Once you get the hang of setting them up there not as bad as peolpe make out.
    Pinno, מלך אידיוט וחרא מכונאי
  • antfly
    antfly Posts: 3,276
    Getting all the mud dumped on your rear brake is a real problem as it causes it to seize up and don't forget to put the tiny screws in or the stays will slide down again at the first opportunity. I just got the topeak ones instead, they are a bit better.
    Smarter than the average bear.
  • Chris87
    Chris87 Posts: 224
    i got a pair for my trek 1.1 and it took about 5 mins to fit.

    just attach to the frame so there is enough clearance at the top then slide the fitting on the guard itself so it has an even clearance around your wheel

    i really dont understand the trouble everyone has with these, of all the things that you could struggle with on a road bike this should be the last.
  • +1 on making sure you put the little screws in once you've got the adjustment right, or else they bounce & you have to go through the whole head scratching process all over again.

    + black tape round stays/forks/ if scratches bother you.

    + cable ties rather than silly rubber bands if you're going to leave them on a while.

    Different shaped forks/stays make them easier/harder to fix. On one frame i have they're great, on another I gave up cos they never stay where you want.
  • Headhuunter
    Headhuunter Posts: 6,494
    rodgers73 wrote:
    They're "crap" in the wet :D

    Indeed they are! The more recent 1 watt one is better but even that packs up in the rain sometimes. I've had several Smart lights and a couple of them have completely packed up for good after rain. I've got the Crud guards mentioned by Nap, above on one of my bikes
    Do not write below this line. Office use only.