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Spesh Allez Double

denty85denty85 Posts: 48
edited February 2011 in Your road bikes
Not the most expensive bike on here but might be of interest to people looking for a starter bike. It's my pride and joy anyway!

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Posts

  • brinbrin Posts: 1,122
    Price doesn't come into the reckoning when, as you say it's your pride and joy, smart bike- would look a lot better with some 'proper' pedals, which i'm sure you are just about to fit :wink: enjoy :)
  • SDK2007SDK2007 Posts: 782
    It looks good; I think the Specialized Allez is the best bike you can buy for under £1k.
  • sturmeysturmey Posts: 964
    Please remove the wheel reflectors and dork disc at your earliest convenience.
    They are illegal on road bikes.
  • tx14tx14 Posts: 244
    sturmey wrote:
    Please remove the wheel reflectors and dork disc at your earliest convenience.
    They are illegal on road bikes.
    what's that plastic disk for? I have always wondered.
  • RidgRidg Posts: 98
    tx14 wrote:
    sturmey wrote:
    Please remove the wheel reflectors and dork disc at your earliest convenience.
    They are illegal on road bikes.
    what's that plastic disk for? I have always wondered.

    to stop crud getting into the cassette

    I've got an '09 Allez and absolutely love it, hope you have as much enjoyment from yours as I've from mine :D
  • LagavulinLagavulin Posts: 1,688
    tx14 wrote:
    what's that plastic disk for? I have always wondered.
    To stop you from over-shifting and mincing your rear wheel with the chain.
    Keep your gears nicely indexed and they're completely unnecessary and as previously pointed out illegal :wink:
  • tx14tx14 Posts: 244
    Lagavulin wrote:
    tx14 wrote:
    what's that plastic disk for? I have always wondered.
    To stop you from over-shifting and mincing your rear wheel with the chain.
    Keep your gears nicely indexed and they're completely unnecessary and as previously pointed out illegal :wink:
    but if you overshift, isn't it more likely that the derailleur would hit the spokes first? cassette is still mostly exposed so i don't see how it would be cleaner.
  • denty85denty85 Posts: 48
    Firstly, My 105 pedals are in the post so they're going on next. I already have the shoes to go with but as always, when you really want something, Royal Mail take their time!!

    Secondly, i'll get onto the reflectors. A good point well made!
  • denty85denty85 Posts: 48
    Firstly, My 105 pedals are in the post so they're going on next. I already have the shoes to go with but as always, when you really want something, Royal Mail take their time!!

    Secondly, i'll get onto the reflectors. A good point well made!
  • I have the same bike, but in black, and I love it. Great bike. I had some Speedplays on it, which I never got on with, but switched to 105 pedals myself and it made the bike even better to me.
  • denty85denty85 Posts: 48
    The 105's are great. Put them on yesterday and the improvement in efficiency is fantastic (with clipless that is, not just the 105's) plus they look great! This my first road bike and I absolutely love it. Plus I haven't felt the need for the extra gears that the more expensive tripple offers yet
  • fish156fish156 Posts: 496
    sturmey wrote:
    Please remove the <edit> dork disc at your earliest convenience.
    Shhhh, it's better if you let people work this out for themselves. It's the cycling equivalent of L-plates - one of the useful indicators of a novice that may be unpredictable in a group. By the time they realise it's pointless and ugly they may have picked up some road skills. ;-)

    Welcome to the world of road cycling denty. :-)
  • Cheers, i'm sure i'm being a bit of a spoon with this but how do the wheel reflectors come off. can't work it out!

    apologies in advance for being an idiot
  • denty85 wrote:
    Cheers, i'm sure i'm being a bit of a spoon with this but how do the wheel reflectors come off. can't work it out!

    apologies in advance for being an idiot

    Kick them :wink:
  • sturmeysturmey Posts: 964
    how do the wheel reflectors come off. can't work it out!

    They usually have a small slot for a screwdriver on each side of the reflector.Just give them a quarter turn to release them then they come away in two halves(i think)
  • As mentioned there is a small slot on the side that you can turn with a flat head screwdriver. However, on my Allez the plastic screw comes out and the reflector can then be pulled out as one piece. But either way they are easy to get off. Getting the dork disk off is easy as well if you are even slightly familiar with being able to use tools and your hands.
  • go on then. how does the dork come off? it looks clipped on but the cogs at the back (that's technical language!) look like they're restricting it from coming off.
  • First off I should mention you'll need a couple of special tools. A chain whip to keep the cogs from moving around, and a cassette lockring removal tool. They shouldn't cost too much and are worth having anyway for other times you might want to remove the rear cogs(cleaning, replacing, etc.)

    So first just remove your rear wheel. Then remove the skewer.

    Then you insert the lockring removal tool into the top of the cassette. At this point use the chain whip to secure the cassette so it won't keep spinning. Then you use a wrench (spanner in the UK i believe) to turn the lockring tool and loosen it.

    You can then pull the lock ring out of the way and remove the cogs. I was able to just slowly pull them out together, but there will be a few separate cogs. Just make sure to keep track of what order they come off, as well as the spacers in between them and you should be fine.

    Once the cassette is off you can just pop the dork disk off. I also used this as an opportunity to thoroughly clean the cassette cogs.

    Then replace everything in the reverse order. Be sure not to over-torque the lockring when you put it back on and make sure to start screwing it on straight by hand so you don't cross thread it into the cassette.

    There are also a variety of videos on Youtube that show the process if you need a visual to help you out, but it really isn't too bad and is a good way to start learning how to work on your own bike.
  • taz3611taz3611 Posts: 172
    Or you could just cut it off with strong scissors/snips. It's not like you're ever going to use it again.
  • does sound like a lot of messing about.

    Snips idea sounds better!
  • I didn't just cut it off because I didn't feel like having little bits of plastic get everywhere as the disk is made of hard, brittle plastic.

    Either method shouldn't take very long at all though.
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