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Best route St. Pauls to CS3?

blacknosugarblacknosugar Posts: 36
edited February 2011 in Commuting chat
I feel like I haven't really got the hang of this part of the city!
In the mornings I cut across to Commercial Road before Shadwell and head through Aldgate which I find OK, if a bit fiddly with the multi-lane traffic. I don't like heading back the same way though as it doesn't feel very cycle friendly going East-bound through Aldgate (or down Commercial Road at that time of day).

Can anyone recommend the best route from Holborn Viaduct / St. Pauls to the start of CS3? (or the other way, for that matter)
"Always carry a firearm East of Aldgate, Watson."

Posts

  • EKE_38BPMEKE_38BPM Posts: 5,821
    Its just over a mile! Get an A to Z and explore.
    FCN 3: Raleigh Record Ace fixie-to be resurrected sometime in the future
    FCN 4: Planet X Schmaffenschmack 2- workhorse
    FCN 9: B Twin Vitamin - winter commuter/loan bike for trainees

    I'm hungry. I'm always hungry!
  • hatbeardhatbeard Posts: 1,087
    eke is correct, pull up a google map and have a look and you'll soon find a route you feel comfortable with.

    in addition google streetview is a fantastic tool for travelling along the route and getting a feel for the junctions you'll have to deal with, the one thing I'll say is don't take it as gospel as the images can be dated and road layout is subject to change.

    this is how I get around london by bike though, I know my commute inside out but travelling further afield usually entails a google streetview tour first.

    it takes a few minutes and it really will help as you will be able to pick up on landmarks that will be invaluable in finding your way.
    Hat + Beard
  • EKE_38BPMEKE_38BPM Posts: 5,821
    To learn your way around London, do what cabbies do when they do 'the knowledge'. Learn the main route from A to B. Learn the offshoots to that route.
    Learn the main route from A to C. Learn the offshoots to that route.
    Learn the main route from B to C. You will be surprised that you already know some of the offshoots.

    I would recommend you learn the main ways to and from work and wherever you hang out or visit regularly and take it from there.
    Stretch further afield sticking to the main roads. When you reach your destination or return home compare the route you took with what looks optimal on the map and the next time you do the trip you can refine what you did.

    I would also recommend getting the tfl cycle route maps. They are basically the A to Z without the index (so you have to know where you destination is), but with the cycle routes on it (busy roads, shared pavements, off-road bikes recommended routes etc), bike shops (name, address and phone number), useful links (e.g. London Cycle Campaign) and advice (don't ride in the door zone etc).
    The main reason I recommend them over an A to Z in book form is that they are big fold out maps (a la OS maps) so you can easily fold it to the section you want and stuff it into a pocket rather than constantly flicking through the pages of a book.
    The size of the maps (14 cover all of London) also make route planning easier rather than following a road from page to page of a book.
    I have the older set (19 maps rather than the current 14) and that has central London (Marylebone in the north west to Borough in the south east) on the reverse.
    All of this, delivered to your door, at the amazing price of zero pounds and zero pence.
    The only way to improve them, in my opinion, is by adding contour lines so you get an idea of how hilly the terrain is. If they had this you could easily detour around hills. No point going up a hill just to go down it again if you could go around it easily.

    Use the maps in conjunction with Hat Beard's suggestion of Streetview so that you can recognise your turns rather than stopping at every junction to check the map and you'll learn all the rat-runs soon enough.

    I bet you cyclists in the provinces wish you had this!
    FCN 3: Raleigh Record Ace fixie-to be resurrected sometime in the future
    FCN 4: Planet X Schmaffenschmack 2- workhorse
    FCN 9: B Twin Vitamin - winter commuter/loan bike for trainees

    I'm hungry. I'm always hungry!
  • EKE_38BPM wrote:
    To learn your way around London, do what cabbies do when they do 'the knowledge'. Learn the main route from A to B. Learn the offshoots to that route.
    Learn the main route from A to C. Learn the offshoots to that route.
    Learn the main route from B to C. You will be surprised that you already know some of the offshoots.

    I would recommend you learn the main ways to and from work and wherever you hang out or visit regularly and take it from there.
    Stretch further afield sticking to the main roads. When you reach your destination or return home compare the route you took with what looks optimal on the map and the next time you do the trip you can refine what you did.

    I would also recommend getting the tfl cycle route maps. They are basically the A to Z without the index (so you have to know where you destination is), but with the cycle routes on it (busy roads, shared pavements, off-road bikes recommended routes etc), bike shops (name, address and phone number), useful links (e.g. London Cycle Campaign) and advice (don't ride in the door zone etc).
    The main reason I recommend them over an A to Z in book form is that they are big fold out maps (a la OS maps) so you can easily fold it to the section you want and stuff it into a pocket rather than constantly flicking through the pages of a book.
    The size of the maps (14 cover all of London) also make route planning easier rather than following a road from page to page of a book.
    I have the older set (19 maps rather than the current 14) and that has central London (Marylebone in the north west to Borough in the south east) on the reverse.
    All of this, delivered to your door, at the amazing price of zero pounds and zero pence.
    The only way to improve them, in my opinion, is by adding contour lines so you get an idea of how hilly the terrain is. If they had this you could easily detour around hills. No point going up a hill just to go down it again if you could go around it easily.

    Use the maps in conjunction with Hat Beard's suggestion of Streetview so that you can recognise your turns rather than stopping at every junction to check the map and you'll learn all the rat-runs soon enough.

    I bet you cyclists in the provinces wish you had this!




    Sssshhhh don't tell em how good we have it. we are supposed to make em think its really dangerous .
    Veni Vidi cyclo I came I saw I cycled
    exercise.png
  • nichnich Posts: 888
    cycle in a zig zag motion, sometimes turning back on yourself. it works for me when im walking around drunk. I always get home :p
  • hatbeardhatbeard Posts: 1,087
    nich wrote:
    cycle in a zig zag motion, sometimes turning back on yourself. it works for me when im walking around drunk. I always get home :p

    what use is it you giving him directions to your house? :roll:
    Hat + Beard
  • EC2boyEC2boy Posts: 37
    There's a really nifty link from CS3 to St Paul's. Coming from CS3, instead of turning into the gyratory turn right on to the pavement which is shared use. Cross the traffic lights and then there's a two-way bike track. Follow that and it basically guides you to Leadenhall St which is now two-way for cycling but not for cars. That pops you out right by Bank junction and then just take whichever route seems easiest to St Paul's
  • MrBlondMrBlond Posts: 161
    Get on the TFL route planner (http://journeyplanner.tfl.gov.uk/user/X ... P_REQUEST2) and use that, gives you a PDF map showing all the rat runs etc.

    I do that route and while I vary it from time to time (sometimes commercial road, sometimes CS3) the TFL bit through the city is still the best one I've found.
  • http://bit.ly/ejyAbM

    I do this route every day. Quick and not that many traffic lights.
  • identikit wrote:
    http://bit.ly/ejyAbM

    I do this route every day. Quick and not that many traffic lights.

    Isn't Shorter Street (between Tower Hill Terrace and Royal Mint Street) one way?
  • identikit wrote:
    http://bit.ly/ejyAbM

    I do this route every day. Quick and not that many traffic lights.

    Isn't Shorter Street (between Tower Hill Terrace and Royal Mint Street) one way?

    Yes. Most people ride onto the pavement. I cut through the parking bay of the Trowers Hamlets building.

    http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?f=q&sourc ... 79.88,,0,5
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