What to wear?

springtide9
springtide9 Posts: 1,731
edited January 2011 in Road beginners
As well as obviously wanting to look the part at much as possible, but have my road first ride planned (weather permitting) on Sunday (although it looks like it's going to tip down)

I know roughly what I'd wear on an MTB in this weather... but I assume there's more wind chill on the road than offroad.. so had a question on how much to wear in this weather.

Looks like it's going to be around 10 deg c (with 10-17mph winds) - so feels like 7 deg c on Sunday. Will be cycling approx 40 miles (one way to the in-laws). Takes about an hour in the car - so assume it's going to be 2-3 hrs on a bike - depending on the wind (TBH - I have no idea how long it will take!)

I was planning on wearing....
- base layer
- merino wool ls top
- soft shell (cycling) jacket/top
- overshoes
- cycling tights
- under and over winter gloves (can take a pair off if it's too warm)

I guess I can take stuff off if I get too warm... just need to make sure I don't get too cold. As the ride is one way - I'm kind of committed for the full distance/time. Does the above sound about right? On an MTB this would be far too warm... but struggling to pitch the right level on the road. I'm sure after the first ride I'll have more of an idea.

And if it's raining... well I have no mudguards - but was probably going to go for it anyway... don't mind getting soaked - just as long as I'm not cold.

Obviously will have plenty of fluid & food for the journey - pretty happy in that respect.
Simon

Comments

  • danowat
    danowat Posts: 2,877
    You'll probably be a touch warm in that.

    I did my usual 17 mile commute this morning in similar clothing, it was 11C at 6:30am, and was a bit warm, and CBA to stop and shed any layers.
  • Gazzaputt
    Gazzaputt Posts: 3,227
    Ditch the softshell and go for a windproof gilet.
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    Sounds like too many layers on top; you'll be wanting to ditch the LS top or the softshell after 5 miles.
  • springtide9
    springtide9 Posts: 1,731
    Thanks.

    As I don't have a gillet - so I'll ditch the wool top and just wear the base layer under the cycling jacket. The softshell seems pretty thin and I'm not 100% convinced that it's going to be that warm... not owned a product like this before... so maybe I'll take my Camelbak rucksack and pack the wool top - just in case :)

    Thanks again,
    Simon
    Simon
  • nakita222
    nakita222 Posts: 341
    don't take camelbak
  • springtide9
    springtide9 Posts: 1,731
    nakita222 wrote:
    don't take camelbak
    I shall take the camelbak :) I'm not a full blown roadie yet and have so far refused to fit any bottle cages on the frame LOL
    You'll also be horrified to know that I have a pair of XT pedals which I'll obviously be using with my off-road shoes (studs and all)
    Simon
  • nakita222
    nakita222 Posts: 341
    omg i'm about to jump off a building, please get some water bottle cages , spuds are allowed as long as studs are removed. :D
  • meanredspider
    meanredspider Posts: 12,337
    I'd be wearing just the softshell (Gore Phantom or Assos 851) in those conditions. Much warmer and I'd be in shorts (ah shorts - can't wait!). Certainly only one pair of gloves too. Overshoes will keep the wet out (mostly...)
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
  • danowat
    danowat Posts: 2,877
    (ah shorts - can't wait!).

    Its amazing how fantasizing about "the warmer months" can make even the most dark, dreary, wet and horrible commute go quicker!!!
  • you guys should be in Southern California this week. I think the coldest it's gotten is in the 60*F range, but I leave my house a bit early, while it's still dark out :p
  • ben16v
    ben16v Posts: 296
    i use this to gauge what clothing i should put on, BTW i havent got any assos stuff just find the guide useful and try to match as close as possible

    http://www.assos.com/en/44/als.aspx
    i need more bikes
  • springtide9
    springtide9 Posts: 1,731
    @nakita222 : LOL

    Thanks all. Really useful stuff :D Just now need to hope the cheap(ish) softshell is comparable to the Gore.
    Simon
  • cougie
    cougie Posts: 22,512
    Definitely too much kit on there. I dont think I'd bother with overshoes and light gloves would be enough.

    That said - you'll often see riders on the same day wearing radically opposite levels of kit - its down to the individual.
  • springtide9
    springtide9 Posts: 1,731
    Thanks again. Took advice and rode with just the base layer and jacket.
    The jacket rocks... and yes I was a bit warm (but not uncomfortable)

    Overshoes were fine - as I have summer mtb shoes.... so are great if its a bit damp.

    Gloves - just the one pair - which wwre also a bit warm.. but fine really.

    Overall - probably about right as the weather almost changed from cloudy to rain... but after a few spots... it went away as quick as it apppeared.

    Thanks again...Simon
    Simon
  • Now you got the clothing sorted, tell how long it took!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Limited Edition Boardman Team Carbon No. 448
    Boardman MTB Team
  • springtide9
    springtide9 Posts: 1,731
    Now you got the clothing sorted, tell how long it took!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Well, I am a MTBer and this was my first go.... so probably not the fastest pace (excuses!)

    I also completely misjudged the distance - thought it was around 40 miles... but it was only actually 27miles. So was pacing myself more than I need - I'm sure. (more excuses!)
    Will have another go the next time we visit....

    OK, enough of the excuses :) .... how did I do....

    http://connect.garmin.com/activity/63777545

    Time: 01:56:11
    Distance: 45.48 km
    Elevation Gain: 492 m
    Avg Speed: 23.5 km/h
    Avg Moving Speed: 25.4 km/h
    Max Speed: 65.7 km/h

    Pretty happy with the compact gearing... and very glad I don't have a standard chainset LOL

    The best bit was that my wife left an hour after me in the car with the kids... hoping to pass my on the way.... but I got there first!
    Simon
  • paulbox
    paulbox Posts: 1,203
    I shall take the camelbak :) I'm not a full blown roadie yet and have so far refused to fit any bottle cages on the frame LOL
    :lol: I'm also just getting in to the road thing, you'll find it quite nice not having your camelbak on, take the leap mate.

    I fitted a second bottle cage this weekend ready for some longer rides... 8)
    XC: Giant Anthem X
    Fun: Yeti SB66
    Road: Litespeed C1, Cannondale Supersix Evo, Cervelo R5
    Trainer: Bianchi via Nirone
    Hack: GT hardtail with Schwalbe City Jets
  • springtide9
    springtide9 Posts: 1,731
    I don't really mind the extra weight TBH... And I prefer carrying a reasonable amount of kit (tools, pump, clothing, food, water etc)... just in case...
    I'm also about 4 stone lighter than this time last year... so a few kg on my back is neither here or there (preferable on your back than around your 'middle' :) )
    And also not at a level where this amount of weight really makes that much difference (making it harder with the extra weight also might mean that I'll be faster once I dump the weight)

    I'm not totally against bottle cages... I will obviously fit them when I race..... but in the meantime Ill be keeping my 'man bag'. I'm in my 40s... so obviously very stuck in my ways (and being without water [number of years ago] for over 3 hrs due to loosing a bottle out of it's cage hasn't helped with my love affair with the bottle/case setup)
    Simon
  • paulbox
    paulbox Posts: 1,203
    I think our backgrounds are very similar, I'm 41, been MTB'ing for about 18 years on and off. Bought first road bike in December.

    I swear by Camelbaks, all I'm saying is that it's a nice feeling not having anything attached to your back, regardless of the weight.

    I have a small saddlebag which is big enough for two tubes, a multi tool, levers, repair kit and a £20 note for emergencies. I have a pump attached to a holder on cage mounts and and couple of cages (but only used one so far). I think you'd have to be pretty unlucky to be more than 45min's from a shop/petrol station when cycling on road, but I do know where you're coming from, ran out of water on a very hot day in the Peak district a few years back, nightmare!
    XC: Giant Anthem X
    Fun: Yeti SB66
    Road: Litespeed C1, Cannondale Supersix Evo, Cervelo R5
    Trainer: Bianchi via Nirone
    Hack: GT hardtail with Schwalbe City Jets
  • springtide9
    springtide9 Posts: 1,731
    Thanks for the storage info... :) (on where to keep stuff)
    Sounds like you had a very similar nightmare in the peaks. I'm sure it's very unlikely to happen as 'bottle loss' is usually because the terrain is rough (and MTBing by it's nature - is more remote)

    Looks like I need to invest in a saddle bag at some point as well as getting a multitool that is a little bit lighter than my current cheapo one that feels a little heavy & bulky.

    Will probably be a bit more inclined to ditch the Camelbak in the summer once the weather is a bit more settled (as well as get a bit more used to amount of clothing I need to wear)

    In the two hours cycling... I took on around 1.5 litres. I do loose a lot of fluid while exercising (about 1 litre/hr at the gym - from measuring my weight).... but loosing this amount of fluid on the road meant that I was too warm. So also need to work this out a little better.

    All in all, considering I have been in the past very pro MTBing over road biking... the ride was very enjoyable once I'd got off the main roads. I was amazed on how fast you can belt down country roads once you are out of the wind.

    And hopefully... the road training will help with the MTBing.
    Simon
  • briantrumpet
    briantrumpet Posts: 18,818
    the ride was very enjoyable once I'd got off the main roads. I was amazed on how fast you can belt down country roads once you are out of the wind.
    Hmm, lots of the country roads round Devon are lovely, but not fun to 'belt down', as so many are single track, and you never know when you're going to meet someone in a car coming round the corner in the middle of the road! So I tend to stick to mainer roads, or the wider minor roads, if I'm in a belting mood!

    When I started doing long road rides I took a backpack, but ditching that and relying on jersey-carried supplies or stopping at shops in extremis was a very good move indeed, whatever time of the year.
  • litwardle
    litwardle Posts: 259
    the ride was very enjoyable once I'd got off the main roads. I was amazed on how fast you can belt down country roads once you are out of the wind.
    Hmm, lots of the country roads round Devon are lovely, but not fun to 'belt down', as so many are single track, and you never know when you're going to meet someone in a car coming round the corner in the middle of the road! .

    Ooof my thoughts exactly! Made me shudder when you said that! Roads down here a lovely but that means they are nice to drive too, and usually NLS so you tend to find yourself face to face with a 60MPH vehicle bearing down on you! They are very rarely on their side of the road!

    I miss my camelbak too (MTB background also) I have to cages with two large bottles. They're nice and secure but I like the convenience of a tube dangling in front of my face rather than messing with the bottle. Still, Camelback on the road is a pain, especially in the drops when trying to get as aero as possible!

    Lee
  • springtide9
    springtide9 Posts: 1,731
    LOL - Just because I'm on a bike - it doesn't mean that I disregard road safety. As they say, expect the unexpected.

    As for a camelbak making much difference in terms of wind resistance.. I personally think this is what is known as the 'placebo effect' for someone at my level [i.e. over 40 non pro ] :)

    I don't really care about wind resistance when out on a 'Sunday ride' - if it makes it a little harder - it's good in my book.
    Simon