Kona Honky Inc for cobbled classics?

crimsondynamo
crimsondynamo Posts: 246
edited January 2011 in Road buying advice
Toying with the idea of the Ronde sportive this spring.

My current alu road bike is great on sunny days and smooth tarmac, but would not be the first choice for rain and cobbles.

The Honky Inc is steel, cf fork, disc brakes, old 105, 28mm tires and loads of clearance, and good geometry for me, i.e ought to be v. comfortable? Evans have it for £800. The only downside is that it will be massively heavy, I suspect I'd be lucky to get any change from 25lbs.

Reading the CW report on teh Ronde, she chewed through a set of brakes in one day and was screeching by the end, which I don't like the sound of.

A honky inc would also take on winter bike duties.

Your views?

Comments

  • Garry H
    Garry H Posts: 6,639
    I would say that anything shod in 28s would do the job nicely.
  • Chip \'oyler
    Chip \'oyler Posts: 2,323
    That bike sounds like overkill for the Ronde.

    I did the Ronde two years ago - In my experience I would use your exsiting Alu frame - get a pair of 36 spoke wheels handbuilt then shod them with the widest tyres you can get away with. Put an extra roll of handlebar tape on. Put new Green Swiss Stop brake blocks on. You'll also need to use the old fashionned metal bottle cage design, and bend the top down so that it really grips your bottles. And make sure everything else is well bolted.

    First sector of pave we hit bike bits were flying everywhere!

    If the CW rider went through a set of blocks then I can only imagine she is the world's most nervous descender! I don't remember using the brakes more than on a normal ride.
    Expertly coached by http://www.vitessecyclecoaching.co.uk/

    http://vineristi.wordpress.com - the blog for Viner owners and lovers!
  • Monty Dog
    Monty Dog Posts: 20,614
    DeRonde isn't as much of a 'bike beater' as some make out - some people think it's the bike that makes the difference whereas it's usually lack of fitness and strength that is a more determinant factor - the stronger, fitter rider will fair far better. I've no doubt the Kona would survive, but it's fairly weighty and you'll tire more quickly particulaly trying to haul it's mass up the bergs. It's not a muddy course either, so discs won't make much difference.
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • The wheels on my alu bike are handbuilt, 36 rear 32 front. Currently have plastic Bonty bottle cages which have a vice like grip. 25mm tires are a possibility but certainly nothing bigger, it's pretty tight. It sounds like that and another roll of bar tape and I'm dancing.
  • Chip \'oyler
    Chip \'oyler Posts: 2,323
    The wheels on my alu bike are handbuilt, 36 rear 32 front. Currently have plastic Bonty bottle cages which have a vice like grip. 25mm tires are a possibility but certainly nothing bigger, it's pretty tight. It sounds like that and another roll of bar tape and I'm dancing.

    Perfect. As Monty says make sure you're fit enough to get up the Berg's sat down in a big gear. It really helps with traction - just watch the locals fly up them!
    Expertly coached by http://www.vitessecyclecoaching.co.uk/

    http://vineristi.wordpress.com - the blog for Viner owners and lovers!
  • Chip \'oyler
    Chip \'oyler Posts: 2,323
    Monty Dog wrote:
    DeRonde isn't as much of a 'bike beater' as some make out - some people think it's the bike that makes the difference whereas it's usually lack of fitness and strength that is a more determinant factor - the stronger, fitter rider will fair far better. I've no doubt the Kona would survive, but it's fairly weighty and you'll tire more quickly particulaly trying to haul it's mass up the bergs. It's not a muddy course either, so discs won't make much difference.

    Yes it PR that's the 'bike beater'!
    Expertly coached by http://www.vitessecyclecoaching.co.uk/

    http://vineristi.wordpress.com - the blog for Viner owners and lovers!
  • rick_chasey
    rick_chasey Posts: 72,730
    In the dry the pros will use their 23s in the Tour of Flanders, and, let's face it, they're probably putting plenty more force and energy through the bike than you ever will.