Speedplay pedals

gbr236
gbr236 Posts: 393
edited January 2011 in Road buying advice
Hi
I fancy changing to speedplay
Please can you explain the difference (material aside) between the different pedals (zero, x1, x2 etc)
Thanks

Comments

  • majormantra
    majormantra Posts: 2,094
    X is the old design, Light Action is for people who can't handle Zeros (weaker spring), Zeros are the best and most versatile. Get them. Sorted.
  • TMR
    TMR Posts: 3,986
    Light Action is for people who can't handle Zeros (weaker spring)

    What do you mean by that? Is it easier or harder to unclip from Zeros as opposed to Light Action?
  • sungod
    sungod Posts: 16,536
    light action are easier to clip-in/out compared to zero

    but they are fixed at 15 degrees free float, whereas zero has adjustable free float, from 0 to 15 degrees

    the light action might be a good choice for the young or people who are *really* light weight, or for more casual use

    imho zeros are best for most people, they're not that hard to clip in/out, and the float adjustment is excellent
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • crankycrank
    crankycrank Posts: 1,830
    Agree with Sungod. I think the Zero's would be the best choice for first time Speedplay buyers. They give you the option of limiting the range of float if you are unsure of what you prefer. I have the X version because I prefer to use all the float and don't need the adjustment of the Zero's. Your only other choice to make would be the cost of cro-mo, stainless, or ti spindles.
  • willbevan
    willbevan Posts: 1,241
    i wouldnt buy cro-mo, go for the stainless.....

    ive had two sets of cromo die easily
    Road - BTwin Sport 2 16s
    MTB - Trek Fuel 80
    TT - Echelon

    http://www.rossonwye.cyclists.co.uk/
  • BBH
    BBH Posts: 476
    Mate, glad u asked this as was thinking about getting some myself.
    Found this, maybe it will help? (although, some good info above :D !)

    http://www.dailypeloton.com/speedplayrev.asp

    http://cyclinginfo.co.uk/blog/equipment ... ls-review/

    Can I also ask to those with the pedals, with a smaller 'platform' are you more likely to get hotspots or are they really that comfortable?? Also do the cleats come with the pedals?

    Cheers
    2012 Scott Foil 10 (Shimano dura ace) - in progress
    2011 Cervelo S2 (SRAM Red/Force)
    2011 Cannondale Caad 10 (Shimano 105)

    "Hills Hurt, Couches Kill!!"
    Twitter: @MadRoadie
  • sungod
    sungod Posts: 16,536
    cleats come with the pedals

    the platform is so large that hotspots are probably less likely than with some other systems, but tbh my soles are so stiff i can't even tell there's a cleat there!
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • tx14
    tx14 Posts: 244
    hot spots are related to the size of the platform, size of the cleat mount and stiffness of the sole. you don't automatically get hotspots with a smaller pedal.
  • mrushton
    mrushton Posts: 5,182
    Note that with some shoe shoes (mavic) that Cyclefit in London believe that Speedplay can't always be attached far enough back for some customers and have sourced a custom mounting plate that was made for the Saxo Bank team
    M.Rushton
  • jonmack
    jonmack Posts: 522
    I've just bought a set of Stainless Zeros. I looked on the Speedplay website at the different versions and went with Zeros as they offer the most adjustability. I'm 66kg and can clip in and out of the Zeros fine, they're slightly stiffer to clip in and out of than my Look Keo's but not massively.

    I agree with mrushton though, I have Adidas shoes (made by Mavic) and I have my base plate as far "back" as possible and that's pretty much spot on. It's possible to get this fore/aft extender kit though, so all is not lost - http://www.probikekit.com/display.php?code=A0477
  • mrushton
    mrushton Posts: 5,182
    That's the one Cyclefit have started using. Not neccessary for everyone but it's an option you may need to consider
    M.Rushton
  • TMR
    TMR Posts: 3,986
    I was in Cycle Surgery today at High Wycombe and the chap I was talking to told me that Speedplay were crap. He said they'd had so many warranty returns that they gave up and now sell only Shimano and Look.

    He went on to say that he'd had one Speedplay pedal snap on him.

    I'm taking the above with a pinch of salt obviously, I can't believe they are that bad, they're used in the Pro-Peloton by 7 teams IIRC.
  • crankycrank
    crankycrank Posts: 1,830
    I was in Cycle Surgery today at High Wycombe and the chap I was talking to told me that Speedplay were crap. He said they'd had so many warranty returns that they gave up and now sell only Shimano and Look.
    He went on to say that he'd had one Speedplay pedal snap on him.
    I'm taking the above with a pinch of salt obviously, I can't believe they are that bad, they're used in the Pro-Peloton by 7 teams IIRC.
    I have never heard of Speedplays having any massive reliability problems. Seeing how this shop doesn't sell them anymore they might want to scare their customers into buying, what else, Shimano and Look. I've had 3 sets of X series stainless with my current pair having over 15K miles on them with all the original parts only having to replace the cleats about every 7K miles. Personally have never had a single problem with any of them. Speedplays are not to everyones liking but reliablility is not an issue.
  • sturmey
    sturmey Posts: 964
    edited January 2011
    Bought a pair of Zero's lastyear to see what all the fuss was about.
    Came to adjust the float adjustment screws on the cleats and one of them wouldn't turn in either direction and prevented float adjustment of any kind on that cleat. Obviously down to some machining defect. Thought that was a bit cr*p considering the price of the pedals.
    Also found the pedals/cleats a bit of a faff tbh, three part assembly and all- i.e. shims ,then mounting plate, then cleat.
    Oh, and don't forget to grease the bearings regularly as well.You'll need a grease gun for this by the way.
    Oh, and you need to purchase some dry lube for the cleat springs as well.
    Oh, and don't forget :do not overtighten the cleat mounting screws or the pedal won't release causing risk of serious injury(according to the accompanying blurb).

    Sheesh!
    Forget it!

    Sent them back for a refund. Stick to Shimano now.
  • jonmack
    jonmack Posts: 522
    sturmey wrote:
    Oh, and don't forget to grease the bearings regularly as well.You'll need a grease gun for this by the way.
    Oh, and you need to purchase some dry lube for the cleat springs as well.

    Any self respecting cyclist should own both of those things anyway. Grease guns can be bought for under a tenner, and the grease for a few quid, dry lube is about £4 a bottle, hardly breaks the bank.
  • sturmey
    sturmey Posts: 964
    Any self respecting cyclist should own both of those things anyway

    Yeah,right!

    Along with a crown race cutter, a frame alignment gauge, a headtube reamer, a wheel dishing gauge etc etc.

    Out of interest, just where exactly are the greasing points on a modern road bicycle,I would love to know?

    Don't know how I've survived without one all these years.
  • crankycrank
    crankycrank Posts: 1,830
    The grease ports on the Speedplays are there as a convenience. They can still be easily disassembled and greased the same as any other pedal and don't require any more frequent greasing than other brands but if you want to invest in a grease gun (I bought mine for about £7) it makes it simple a 10 min. job. To simplify this debate, the main advantage of Speedplays is that they offer more free float than any other pedal. If you don't like or need more than the roughly 9 degs max of float most pedals offer than there isn't much advantage in buying the SP's. Plenty of other good pedals out there to choose from as well. But if you do need the extra float then they are about the only choice.