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Organising my own uk charity cycle ride.

chrisinleedsukchrisinleedsuk Posts: 106
edited December 2010 in Tour & expedition
Hi Everyone,

Having looked into the many organised charity cycle rides on offer (and decided that we could raise money more efficiently if the sponsorship wasn't being used to support an events company) me and a few mates are looking to organise our own charity tour of the uk. I think we can organise ourselves, our bikes, the route, accommodation etc but is there any bureaucratic red tape we need to be aware of?

The original idea was for 3 participants which has grown but should not exceed 10 people so I don't think we need to inform the police, do we? I gather insurance is optional and as a daily cyclist it seems a bit nuts to insure against things happening for 7 of the 300+ days of the year I spend on a bike. I'm struggling to think who else might object to the event or require notification.

Posts

  • Your chosen charity will probably have guidelines on their website. You need a local authority license to collect on the street
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2009/sep/21/charity-fundraising-legal-advice
    Neil
    Help I'm Being Oppressed
  • HoopdriverHoopdriver Posts: 2,023
    Unless you have a particular passion for a particular charity or cause, why don't you just skip the tired old do-it-for-charity routine and instead go off on a tour of the countryside because you love being on your bike, and because it's a grand way to see the country?

    For the life of me, I just do not understand why every touring cyclist in this country seems to have to ride for charity every time. Maybe it is just considered poor form over here to do these things for fun? Or am I just missing something?
  • deswellerdesweller Posts: 5,271
    Hoopdriver wrote:
    For the life of me, I just do not understand why every touring cyclist in this country seems to have to ride for charity every time. Maybe it is just considered poor form over here to do these things for fun? Or am I just missing something?

    I think it's just a way of taking out two birds with one stone. If you're doing the tour anyway, then why not raise a bit of useful dough on the side for someone at the same time?
    - - - - - - - - - -
    On Strava.{/url}
  • HoopdriverHoopdriver Posts: 2,023
    Sure, I can understand that. It's just that every time I go on a tour in this country I have every other person asking me what charity I am doing it for - as if I wouldn't simply want to be out and about on my bike for its own sake. When I tell them I am doing it purely for the joy of it, I get puzzled frowns and sniffs.

    This charity business just seems so grossly overdone.
  • amaferangaamaferanga Posts: 6,789
    desweller wrote:
    Hoopdriver wrote:
    For the life of me, I just do not understand why every touring cyclist in this country seems to have to ride for charity every time. Maybe it is just considered poor form over here to do these things for fun? Or am I just missing something?

    I think it's just a way of taking out two birds with one stone. If you're doing the tour anyway, then why not raise a bit of useful dough on the side for someone at the same time?

    Getting sponsored to do a leisurely tour of the UK is a bit like getting sponsored to walk your dog every day.....
    More problems but still living....
  • I'm going to totally disagree. The sponsorship thing is just an "excuse" to ask for people to give money to the charity. For whatever reasons, people feel happier about that. With respect, walking the dog isn't the same as touring the country by bike either (at least not for 99.99..9% of the population). My wife walks our two dogs - it takes no planning, hardly any discomfort, practically no effort nor is it in the slightest bit unusual. Now if you're a "world cyclist" a tour of the UK by bike might seem like walking the dog.

    Lighten up a bit. You don't have to get sponsored but why don't you - do some good for the world rather than just thinking of yourself.
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
  • i organise a charity do every year and to be honest, logitics is a right pain. how are you going about this? where will you sleep and how? camp,hotel or hostel?
    i have a lot of ideas that keep costs down and achievable as our ride this year will cost in eecess of £12,000 if we dont broker deals, rendering the trip too expensive and no money will be raised. pm me and i can give you some pointers. otherwise i could ramble on all day.

    p.s... check out our mull to hull thread on the tour forum.
    :)
  • HoopdriverHoopdriver Posts: 2,023
    Wow. Your description of your wife's walking the dogs is such an exact parallel to a cycling jaunt over the length of Britain I am surprised your typing didn't taper to a halt in mid sentence as you wrote it: it takes little planning, involves hardly any discomfort and little effort and is not the least bit unusual.

    Cycle touring is a holiday, whether you are a 'world' cyclist or a weekender out to see a bit of the countryside

    Frankly I'd be embarrassed to go around rattling a tin cup and asking to be sponsored for taking a holiday.
  • PokerfacePokerface Posts: 8,640
    I've done a charity ride (one of the big ones) before.

    All I will say is good luck if you go ahead with it. Hitting up friends, family and random strangers for money is MUCH harder than the ride itself. Especially these days when money is tight for most people.

    If you do it on your own, you will probably find even more resistance to people giving money as you don't have 'a big name charity' behind you. When I raised money - people could see it was going directly to the charity, etc and felt more comfortable about donating.

    People you don't know will feel less comfortable handing over money to you directly with just 'your word' that it will go to charity - if you see what I mean.
  • iPeteiPete Posts: 6,076
    Easy formula for success, keep it simple & fun.

    Forget support cars and other expensive to run accessories.

    Me and my mate walked out the front door one morning, panniers and tents on the back and set of for Rome. The only things we booked were the ferry, accommodation in Rome and a return flight.

    On the charity front, we set up a Just Giving for a local charity and let word spread, 100% to the charity this way. Set a realistic price target and as a bonus waxed our legs when X-target was reached, oh and let the people who sponsored me do it over a few beers. :lol:

    I'd also expect of all those interested a certain percentage will drop out, we went from 6 keen people to 2.
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