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Electronic shifting

geebee2geebee2 Posts: 248
edited December 2010 in The bottom bracket
I'm not sure electronic gear shifting is a good thing.

For me, a bike should be powered by the rider, not a battery.

What do you think?

Is electronic gear shifting a good idea 0 votes

Yes - I'm in favor - I cannot wait to get it
0% 0 votes
No I don't think it's right in principle
0% 0 votes
Yes - I;m in favor if it's cheap enough
0% 0 votes

Posts

  • ChiggyChiggy Posts: 261
    "What can go wrong, will go wrong".

    Murphy.
  • geebee2 wrote:
    a bike should be powered by the rider, not a battery.

    What do you think?

    Bike is still being "powered" by the rider, pedals being turned propells you forward, just the gearchanging is being done electrically by a servo motor, not a lot different to the rider pushing a lever and a cable doing the movement, with Di2 the rider presses a button / lever and it`s an electrical cable causing the movement, it`s still a remote operation.

    Bet Andy Schleck has Shimano Di2 on his Christmas pressie list :wink:
    Jens says "Shut up legs !! "

    Specialized S-Works SaxoBank SL4 Tarmac Di2
  • geebee2 wrote:
    I'm not sure electronic gear shifting is a good thing.

    For me, a bike should be powered by the rider, not a battery.

    What do you think?
    Would all your objections be lifted if it was powered by a dynamo? You could also run your lights off it, too.
  • beverickbeverick Posts: 3,461
    I couldn't see the point in derailleurs when I had hub gears;
    I couldn't see the point in 5 speed gears when I had 3;
    I couldn't see the point in 10 speed gears when I had 5;
    I couldn't see the point in indexed gears when I had friction levers on the downtube;
    I couldn't see the point in 24 speed gears when I had 10;
    I couldn't see the point in 30 speed gears when I had 24;
    I can't see the point in having 33 gears now I have 30;
    I can't see the point in replacing a metre of steel cable with two copper wires.

    So I'll no doubt have electronic gears when they're cheap enough.

    (I do think we should work on improving people's ability to spell in the meantime.)

    Bob
  • Chiggy wrote:
    "What can go wrong, will go wrong".

    Murphy.

    Well, it isn't taking away from the rider's effort. Wait for Clarkson' "flappy-paddle gearboxes" or for an automatic lol. I voted no, not for 'on principle' but it's simply unnecessary.
    http://twitter.com/mgalex
    www.ogmorevalleywheelers.co.uk

    10TT 24:36 25TT: 57:59 50TT: 2:08:11, 100TT: 4:30:05 12hr 204.... unfinished business
  • Sorry if this is a foolish question, but what is the suggested advantage of electronic gear changes?
  • deswellerdesweller Posts: 5,271
    I chiefly see it as an opportunity to get rid of all the problems we have with mixed standards. The same shifter could operate 9-speed, 10-speed, hub gears of all kinds. Plus you could have more than one set of shift buttons on your bars if you wanted, so a couple of buttons on your tri-bar extensions as well as your brake levers for example.
    - - - - - - - - - -
    On Strava.{/url}
  • I'm in favour, however, It will eventually lead to automation of gear changes ie, if you're most efficient cadence is at 80rpm then it'll automatically change to the correct gear. They'll also be a connection to disk brakes (yeah, I can't wait for that either) and then we'll have anti-locking.

    For racing I think many fully manual setups should be used.
    CAAD9
    Kona Jake the Snake
    Merlin Malt 4
  • pneumaticpneumatic Posts: 1,989
    desweller wrote:
    I chiefly see it as an opportunity to get rid of all the problems we have with mixed standards. The same shifter could operate 9-speed, 10-speed, hub gears of all kinds. Plus you could have more than one set of shift buttons on your bars if you wanted, so a couple of buttons on your tri-bar extensions as well as your brake levers for example.

    As a consumer, I agree entirely, but if we were manufacturers, we would, as ever, be using this as the ideal opportunity to launch a new and very diverse RANGE of un-interchangeable parts.

    Cue: Shimano Carbon 10 speed tri-bar paddle-shift left-handed narrow-bar attachment kit £89.99 (electronic shifter servos not included, please check your manual for compatibility matrix before ordering to avoid disappointment, only available in Blue; White discontinued)
    :roll:


    Fast and Bulbous
    Peregrinations
    Eddingtons: 80 (Metric); 60 (Imperial)

  • ilm_zero7ilm_zero7 Posts: 2,213
    It will eventually lead to automation of gear changes ie, if you're most efficient cadence is at 80rpm then it'll automatically change to the correct gear. .

    isnt the next logical step some form of CVT - continuously variable transmission for bikes then? maybe DAF could get into the bike scene!
    http://veloviewer.com/SigImage.php?a=3370a&r=3&c=5&u=M&g=p&f=abcdefghij&z=a.png
    Wiliers: Cento Uno/Superleggera R and Zero 7. Bianchi Infinito CV and Oltre XR2
  • ProssPross Posts: 23,818
    Didn't see the point until I tried it out briefly. If they were sensibly priced (and I could afford them) then yes I would get some.
  • Smokin JoeSmokin Joe Posts: 5,669
    beverick wrote:
    I couldn't see the point in derailleurs when I had hub gears;
    I couldn't see the point in 5 speed gears when I had 3;
    I couldn't see the point in 10 speed gears when I had 5;
    I couldn't see the point in indexed gears when I had friction levers on the downtube;
    I couldn't see the point in 24 speed gears when I had 10;
    I couldn't see the point in 30 speed gears when I had 24;
    I can't see the point in having 33 gears now I have 30;
    I can't see the point in replacing a metre of steel cable with two copper wires.

    So I'll no doubt have electronic gears when they're cheap enough.

    (I do think we should work on improving people's ability to spell in the meantime.)

    Bob
    Agree with the above.

    I've been at this a long time, and every single innovation that we now wouldn't buy a bike without was poo pooed as unnecessary when it first appeared. Gear changing is nothing to do with the principle of pedalling the bicycle, just a necessary chore to make more efficient use of your power output, and anything which gets it out of the way more quickly and efficiently is ok by me.

    Give it five years and it will be a commonplace fitment.
  • ceecee Posts: 4,553
    for me the coolest thing about the di2 stuff is the automatic trimming of the mechs...so they move about depending on the chain line...giving a clean run even in a poor gear combo...

    that said...i don't like the idea of a battery running out midway through a long ride.
    Whenever I see an adult on a bicycle, I believe in the future of the human race.

    H.G. Wells.
  • geebee2geebee2 Posts: 248
    snailracer wrote:
    geebee2 wrote:
    I'm not sure electronic gear shifting is a good thing.

    For me, a bike should be powered by the rider, not a battery.

    What do you think?
    Would all your objections be lifted if it was powered by a dynamo? You could also run your lights off it, too.

    I think it's acceptable in the same way that a battery to help you up hills is ok for commuting, but you could also buy a moped.

    But I don't like it from a "pure" bicycling point of view.

    It's just yukky.
  • Smokin JoeSmokin Joe Posts: 5,669
    geebee2 wrote:
    snailracer wrote:
    geebee2 wrote:
    I'm not sure electronic gear shifting is a good thing.

    For me, a bike should be powered by the rider, not a battery.

    What do you think?
    Would all your objections be lifted if it was powered by a dynamo? You could also run your lights off it, too.

    I think it's acceptable in the same way that a battery to help you up hills is ok for commuting, but you could also buy a moped.

    But I don't like it from a "pure" bicycling point of view.

    It's just yukky.
    There is no such thing as a "Pure" bicycle. If it's motion is controlled only by the pedalling efforts of the rider it ticks all the boxes for me.
  • beverickbeverick Posts: 3,461
    cee wrote:
    for me the coolest thing about the di2 stuff is the automatic trimming of the mechs...so they move about depending on the chain line...giving a clean run even in a poor gear combo...

    that said...i don't like the idea of a battery running out midway through a long ride.

    Now if the manufacturers could only design the chain out of the mix.......

    Bob
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 50,052 Lives Here
    If it involves less faff - especially messy greasy faff, then i'm all for it.

    Self-triming sounds bloody excellent.
  • whyamiherewhyamihere Posts: 7,333
    geebee2 wrote:
    I think it's acceptable in the same way that a battery to help you up hills is ok for commuting, but you could also buy a moped.

    But I don't like it from a "pure" bicycling point of view.

    It's just yukky.
    That bike in your avatar looks like it has gears. Surely you should be riding a fixed gear?
  • Dunk_911Dunk_911 Posts: 239
    [quote="Felt so Good"isnt the next logical step some form of CVT - continuously variable transmission for bikes then? maybe DAF could get into the bike scene![/quote]


    *invented ;)
  • The best application is sequential shifting. There was a mtb with bodged Di2 and some electronic magic that meant a tri bar extension pod mounted underbar on one side did 20 gears in sequence by GI perfectly.

    The waiting for the perfect arrangement of sprockets/chainrings is also very neat and leads to very nice shifts in my experience.

    Also CVT is rubbish currently.
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