Speedpaly Zero advice please

billysan
billysan Posts: 575
edited November 2010 in Road buying advice
Thinking of changing to these from my current R520 shimanos.

The adjustable float appeals to me over something like 6700 ultegras which would be the other option I would try.

From what I read, the float of each cleat is adjustable for each direction, ie twisting both in and out. My first quiestion is, does the pedal release immediately at the end of this float? Or is there a further small amount of sprung turn that must be made to release?

My left foot is funny in that I ride with it always pressed against the outermost limit of pedal float, regardless of where the cleat is on the shoe!! Ive tried getting the cleat adjusted so that the position I adopt is in the centre of the float, but my knees/feet are just weird.

Second question is regarding stability. The shimano pedals have a very wide contact area which I like. I hate shimano MTB SPD's for having such a small contact area. Do speedplays have a good solid interface? Comparable to shimano road cleats?

Sorry for the lengthy post. Thanks in advance for any replies.

Comments

  • rus6
    rus6 Posts: 9
    Hi,

    I run speedplay zero's on one of my bikes, you have to push slightly past the amount of float you've adjusted to release, however the pressure required isn't that great.

    I haven't used shimano road cleats but you do have a large contact area as the cleat that engages on to the pedal is large, I've never had any hot spot issues with them and find them very easy to clip into compared to look pedals.

    Hope that helps!
  • sungod
    sungod Posts: 16,517
    the speedplay zero has 'free' float, there's no spring pressure until you reach the end of the float, then you've got to twist firmly to unclip

    contact area is very large, maybe the largest there is

    regarding your left foot, might be worth getting checked to see if you'd benefit from shims and/or arch supports to adjust/stabilize your foot position, if the foot is at the wrong angle vs. horizontal strange things can happen with foot/knee position as you pedal
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • billysan
    billysan Posts: 575
    sungod wrote:
    the speedplay zero has 'free' float, there's no spring pressure until you reach the end of the float, then you've got to twist firmly to unclip

    contact area is very large, maybe the largest there is

    regarding your left foot, might be worth getting checked to see if you'd benefit from shims and/or arch supports to adjust/stabilize your foot position, if the foot is at the wrong angle vs. horizontal strange things can happen with foot/knee position as you pedal

    How tight is the spring tension when you say 'twist firmly to unclip'? I run shimano pedals at max tension for reference. For this reason Im actually tempted to try the track versions of the Zero pedals for their extra release tension.

    Ive had my cleats 'fitted' already, and use shimano custom fit shoes. Regardless of any tinkereing I always just ride with my left heel twisting out to the stop. I need to run max tension to stop myself unclipping inadvertantly. It causes me no discomfort at all riding like this, but it still isnt right.
  • sungod
    sungod Posts: 16,517
    unclipping takes a fair bit of force, it's not the sort of force you'd apply casually

    if you wanted you could get the zero track sprint pedals which have even higher unclipping force, but i really think the standard ones will be fine

    tbh if you wound out the float all the way on a zero i'd be surprised if your foot used up the free float, you'd be pedalling at a crazy angle - the zero's maximum float is 15 degress, i think shimano spd sl is around 6

    the shim/support comment was just an idea...

    after an injury it turned out i need them, without them i get no discomfort in general riding although it makes my foot angle different and my knee motion looks weird, but if i were to put a lot of power down i'd risk repeating the injury. with them i can go as hard as i can manage without problem and my knee motion is linear
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • ADIHEAD
    ADIHEAD Posts: 575
    I run them also but would like to add that the release force is really not that hard, once they're bedded in. From new they can be a bit tight though. Personally I can't recommend them enough, other than the cost of replacement cleats - £40 retail! Speedplay say they should last 5000 miles but you need to be careful not to ride against the float stop as you can wear out the plastic that holds the clip in place.
  • ajb72
    ajb72 Posts: 1,178
    I have not found the force required to unclip any more than the Look style pedal system. The only difference is that if you set the float to the max you will have to twist your foot quite a bit further than other pedals.

    It's unlikely you'd need the maximum float unless you have pretty bad joints, so I wouldn't think you'd find any problems unclipping from standard Zeros.

    I love Speedplays, the platform is fantastic and they are so easy to to engage, being double sided entry. My only complaint is the cost of replacement cleats, and this has made me decide to go back to Look pedals.
  • ADIHEAD
    ADIHEAD Posts: 575
    You ride a Cervelo with high end Campag and you're worried about £40 :o
  • ajb72
    ajb72 Posts: 1,178
    ADIHEAD wrote:
    You ride a Cervelo with high end Campag and you're worried about £40 :o

    Not that it's any of your business but I bought the frameset second hand and sold my mtb to fund the rest.

    I am reluctant to spend £40 on cleats for a set of pedals that are over 3 years old, when for £70 I can buy brand new Look Kio 2 Max. Is that ok with you? :roll:
  • ADIHEAD
    ADIHEAD Posts: 575
    Hey that was only supposed to be friendly banter :shock: No offence meant 8)
  • andyoh
    andyoh Posts: 115
    I also have a set of Speedplay Zero Stainless steel pedals on my bike. I came from Shimano R540 SPD SL's. I have only used the Speedplays for about 200 miles but I am finding them not that easy to use, the problem I have is clipping in, maybe it's beacause they are still relatively new and as I have also been told they take a while to bed in. Unclipping is easy, no problem at all with that.

    I will persevere for a while with them purely because of what I paid for them and I cannot justify another £90 on Keo Max 2 Carbons at the moment, but the Speedplays may well be up for sale in the not too distant future to pay for the Keo's.
  • Canny Jock
    Canny Jock Posts: 1,051
    They do become a lot easier, stick with them. Try using some 'dry' oil on them to help for now.
  • crankycrank
    crankycrank Posts: 1,830
    andyoh wrote:
    I also have a set of Speedplay Zero Stainless steel pedals on my bike. I came from Shimano R540 SPD SL's. I have only used the Speedplays for about 200 miles but I am finding them not that easy to use, the problem I have is clipping in, maybe it's beacause they are still relatively new and as I have also been told they take a while to bed in. Unclipping is easy, no problem at all with that.
    Yes they do get easier after a few miles. Speedplays are also very sensitive to having the cleats mounted fairly flat against the shoe and the mounting screws need to be tightened very snugly but not gorilla strength. If the cleats have too much bend in them against the sole they become difficult to clip in. If this is the case with yours, try using some of the shims provided to level them out. Make sure you lube any surfaces that come in contact with each other as well. I find that, as already mentioned, dry lubes work best so as not to attract a bunch of glop that will foul the springs and rapidly wear down the parts. Wax lubes such as White lightning, Squirt, Finish Line Wax, etc., etc. work well.