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MTB vs Road bike in winter

pamuzupamuzu Posts: 89
edited November 2010 in MTB beginners
Hi

Ive just bought an MTB literally to cover Dec to Mar and the icy weather. I commute to work and was gutted last winter with all the ice and snow. Road bike is being stored away from tomoz. Will the MTB make any difference in the slippy conditions?

Feels really sturdy being on fat tyres!

Cheers
Phil

Posts

  • I'd have thought so. The weather's just got to that point where I'm about to rebuild my commuter MTB myself.

    I think the most important difference is probably psychological- as you said, you just feel more stable on a mountain bike than you do on a road bike. Furthermore, if it snows you'll appreciate those knobbly MTB tyres. I find the more leisurely body position of an MTB to be better when things get slippery too; maybe it's the more relaxed geometry, maybe it's just the fact that I'm going slower, but if the bike starts slipping out I find it a lot easier to control on an MTB- it's just not natural for a road bike to skid!

    You don't mention what pedals you'll be using on the MTB- I use flats, and there have plenty of frosty mornings where I've been glad of them for the ability to get my feet on the ground in an instant.
  • m1tch666m1tch666 Posts: 148
    Plus you can always fit spiked tyres if its really really bad.......
    Dartmoor Primal 26" 1 x 10, 40 expander
    Banshee Spitfire 650b 1 x 10, 42 expander
  • bluechair84bluechair84 Posts: 4,352
    you'll probably find the slacker angles of an MTB make you feel safer as your centre of gravity is further back, possibly lower as well if your seat is down some.

    Run a lower pressure in the front tyre - say 30psi, maybe less so that you have a nice broad footprint.

    send pictures when you do come a cropper :lol:
  • MTB's are more stable than road bikes because of their long wheelbase although being higher off the ground negates that somewhat. Hybrids and touring bikes are the ultimate winter commuters as they have both a long wheelbase and lower centre of gravity. Plus they'll take full mudguards and a rack. Nothing grips on ice (except ice skates).
    I had to beat them to death with their own shoes...
    HiFi Pro Carbon '09

    LTS DH '96

    The Mighty Dyna-Sore - The 90's?
  • diydiy Posts: 6,680
    And they tend to have superior brakes too.

    But the contact patch is the key benefit.. Although in the dry its this and the gearing that really slow you down.
  • If you hit a solid patch of ice, you're going down, either way...

    But as has been said, the MTB has its advantages.
  • They're a lot more fun...

    But if you get a lot of ice and snow consider some decent studded tyres, possibly the ones with studs only on the edges to keep you upright when turning.
  • Superior brakes + lack of grip = pain
    I had to beat them to death with their own shoes...
    HiFi Pro Carbon '09

    LTS DH '96

    The Mighty Dyna-Sore - The 90's?
  • Shaggy_Dog wrote:
    Superior brakes + lack of grip = pain

    depends on the modulation doesn't it? my MTB with it's far more powerful brakes is a lot easier to take to the limits of the tyres than the roadie.
  • True, if I was going to use an MTB on the road I'd have one with V-brakes though, disc brakes get contaminated by the soot and oil on the road surface, ask any bike shop mechanic
    I had to beat them to death with their own shoes...
    HiFi Pro Carbon '09

    LTS DH '96

    The Mighty Dyna-Sore - The 90's?
  • diydiy Posts: 6,680
    Shaggy_Dog wrote:
    True, if I was going to use an MTB on the road I'd have one with V-brakes though, disc brakes get contaminated by the soot and oil on the road surface, ask any bike shop mechanic

    Why isn't this a problem for motorbikes too?

    The materials are fairly similar.
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