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Returning to racing after 16 years off the bike

Dean1234Dean1234 Posts: 18
edited November 2010 in Amateur race
Hi All. This is my first post, so firstly, hoping this is the correct area for this subject!

Just wondered if anyone else has experience of coming back to racing after a long time out, and how they got on their first year?

I rode for five years previously, mainly as a junior (including senior races), and a few months as a senior.

How much training did you have to do to get back in the grove? What has changed most, other than the fact you can pay £1K for lights now :D?

Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Posts

  • mamba80mamba80 Posts: 5,032
    i last raced in the mid 80's
    i returned to riding a road bike 3 yrs ago and did some sportives, it was very hard to get used to training, diet and riding back in grps but it was relaxing and i loved being back on a bike.

    THis summer after doing some hard interval work, i did some cct races (which are like a canonball run in the finish sprints) and some road events, i ve had some top 5 finishes in Cat4 and top 10 in Cat 3/4 and top 20 in 2/3/4 events, so still along way to go.
    Its very hard but amazing fun, especially riding away from guys 1/2 my age :D
    In my experience it will take a while to build up to being competitive but there is loads of stuff out there, equipment and training methods have all evolved but basiclly its the same as ever, you need to be commited - in both senses of the word :lol:

    I train between 6 and 12 hrs a week, mainly on my own (i have a odd hr s job) i use a HRM and try to keep to 2 - 4 hr rides, keeping the pace hard ish, when its pxxxing it down, i do 2 x 20mins intervals on the turbo (my recovery is then on 2 or 3 rest days a week) i'll then build up to shorter intensive variable length intervals after january.
  • Thanks for the advice, much appreciated. Currently sidelined with iliotibial band syndrome after overtraining. Started riding in May and been doing 5ish hours a week MTB riding, then stepped it up to 8 + on the road on a mountain bike. Too much too soon.

    Going to get a road bike (Felt F4) and HRM after I recover and then be really careful building back up. Good thing is I am a bit of a lightweight so don't need to lose much weight, just build up legs, heart and lungs.

    I am as excited as I am nervous of racing again. Think I am just going to start entering races as soon as to get race fit. No pain no gain :D

    Thanks again.
  • Tom ButcherTom Butcher Posts: 7,137
    If you are over 40 have a look at LVRC races as well as the BC.

    it's a hard life if you don't weaken.
  • felgenfelgen Posts: 829
    Here you go have a look at this link.

    He (Andy) was quite a handy rider when younger and seems to be doing pretty well these days too. He's on here as andyedwardsster (I think)
    Steeds:
    1)Planet X SL Pro carbon
    2)Nelson Pista Singlespeed
    3)Giant Cadex MTB
    4)BeOne Karma MTB
  • Thanks for the advice guys. The Don Parry piece is very interesting. I am now 33 and as a junior finished 4th in the Junior Champs and raced for England in Europe a couple of times. First few races as a senior I beat a few decent seniors too, who I see are now leading riders. Then I got a knee injury from using too high a gear (Tell kids in your club, it will finish your career), told I had to take six months off and chucked it all in. Hey ho, no regrets and all that. Well, maybe a few :)

    Anyway, got my first road bike for 16 years today, a 2009 Orbea Orca.

    Once I get these knee fixed I hope to see you all out on the road.
  • nick hansonnick hanson Posts: 1,655
    Dean1234 wrote:
    Thanks for the advice, much appreciated. Currently sidelined with iliotibial band syndrome after overtraining. Started riding in May and been doing 5ish hours a week MTB riding, then stepped it up to 8 + on the road on a mountain bike. Too much too soon.

    Going to get a road bike (Felt F4) and HRM after I recover and then be really careful building back up. Good thing is I am a bit of a lightweight so don't need to lose much weight, just build up legs, heart and lungs.

    I am as excited as I am nervous of racing again. Think I am just going to start entering races as soon as to get race fit. No pain no gain :D

    Thanks again.
    So,you are currently sidelined due to overtraining,correct?
    You are planning to enter races asap to get race fit?
    See a pattern emerging?
    Use this winter to get plenty of steady base miles in,then,build up the intensity in the spring.
    you have to have the base there,to support the higher end work,or get ill/injured
    I returned this year to racing,after about 20 years out( contracted glandular fever in my 20's,due to overtraining)
    Doing steady miles,then racing once or twice a week,I got down to 22 min tens,& under the hour.
    I am now 45,so you should be fine
    so many cols,so little time!
  • Hi Nick, thanks for the advice.

    I think I am basically a bit keen and need to slow down and learn how to ride a bike again. Good to hear your times have got that good in a year, you must have carried some good fitness into the year.

    Good luck with the time trialing, will let you know how I get on later in the year!
  • nick hansonnick hanson Posts: 1,655
    Dean1234 wrote:
    Hi Nick, thanks for the advice.

    I think I am basically a bit keen and need to slow down and learn how to ride a bike again. Good to hear your times have got that good in a year, you must have carried some good fitness into the year.

    Good luck with the time trialing, will let you know how I get on later in the year!
    No worries.
    It does take a lot of patience to keep it steady through the winter,especially trying to keep warn,whilst not pushing it.I find a HRM invaluable for gauging effort (I race at about 180 bpm in a 25,so,i ride steady pace at about 140-150 bpm in the winter)
    best of luck!
    so many cols,so little time!
  • Monty DogMonty Dog Posts: 20,614
    At this time of year, only advise is to join a club/group and get a good winter's mileage behind you - you can worry about speed once you've developed sufficient fitness / endurance. Doing sprints and heavy intervals on a limited endurance / strength base can lead to injury / over-training as your muscles and joints don't have the strength and resilience to cope.
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
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