Forum home Mountain biking forum MTB beginners

Should I be upgrading already?

Ron BonesRon Bones Posts: 23
edited October 2010 in MTB beginners
Hey all, funny question I guess but some help would be appreciated. Basically, earlier this year I bought a mountain bike purely to see if I could get back into it after a long break from riding. 8 years, maybe a little more after doing myself some damage. In essence, I'd lost my balls! Anyway, I bought a cheap bike, a Merida Matts 40d, as I didnt want to spend a fortune and then really not get on with it. The bike has been fantastic, used it to commute mostly but just recently got out on the trails and the downhill courses at Cannock. Got to say, I'm censored at trails as I'm unfit and cannot ride uphill but I love the downhill! Now, my bike is brilliant on the trails, it inspires confidence and is an easy ride but on the downhill I feel a little like its all a bit much for it. Question is really, is it too much for the bike or me?! I dont know! The people I go with are all on full sussers and seem to have an easier time, so I'm wondering whether thats the way to go. What would people recommend? Should I stick with my bike until I kill it, or would my riding only be made more enjoyable by getting a better suited machine? I've seen some 2010 Kona stinky's on 0% finance which look very tempting. A hard question to answer I know but I'm sure someone's had a similar dilema. I dont have money to throw about so I'm just making sure I do the right thing. Thanks.

Posts

  • ride_wheneverride_whenever Posts: 13,279
    Learn to ride better first, then move onto a fs bike.

    Basically ride your current bike upgrading as you break stuff then when you're actually reaching the limits of the bike rather than your own skill :wink: move onto a burlier bike.
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,599
    Buy it, you know you want it.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • Haha, a conflict already! I'm so torn. I like my bike, it seems like a sturdy beast and its a nice compromise I feel, it's more the point that I think I know now it's downhill I want to do and wonder if I'll only get the most out of that on the right bike?! On the other hand I kept up with a couple of guys on lovely santa cruz rigs the other morning on the red run at cannock and felt so proud to be doing it on my £350 hardtail!
  • Steve_FSteve_F Posts: 682
    From what you're saying here you're no where near reaching the limits of your bike, just starting to hit your own limits and want to improve the bike to improve your limits??

    I would say your money would be far better spent getting a few lessons. One of my mates got a two hour lesson and the difference between how he rode before and after was pretty amazing.

    You could also spend a bit of money here and there when you can on your bike. It's not a frame I am familiar with to know if it's worth upgrading on but I'm sure a new wheelset would improve the speed up the hills. A new fork might make improve it over the rough stuff too.

    If you could afford it a new bike is alway great fun and improves your riding but if you can't there are plenty of ways to get better on what you've got.
    Current steed is a '07 Carrera Banshee X
    + cheap road/commuting bike
  • I think your probably right Steve_F! The bike is fine really, I feel confident on it, and its very chuckable, I'm actually surprised how good it is. I'm pondering maybe putting some fatter more DH orientated tires on there for a start, I already put some wider bars and flat DMR type pedals which have improved it no end. Forks would be next on the list, theyre not great but I'll wait till they break first. Lessons are a good idea. Could well be worth a look! Thanks.
  • wordnumbwordnumb Posts: 847
    The resale on your Medrida won't amount to anything, so ride it like you stole it, find your limits on that bike and learn to knock it back into shape (ie basic wheel truing, gear indexing). Then you'll have a better idea what you want from a more expensive bike. I wouldn't bother upgrading (other than grips and pedals and stuff that can be transferred).
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,599
    There is no 'skill level' for bikes. If you want it, can afford it and will have fun on it get it.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • paulboxpaulbox Posts: 1,203
    cooldad wrote:
    There is no 'skill level' for bikes. If you want it, can afford it and will have fun on it get it.
    +1

    What the guys have said about getting a couple of lessons and improving your skills is definitely a good idea, but personally I think 60%+ of being a good rider is in your head.

    If a bike makes you feel more confident, it will also improve your riding. The same goes for the tyres etc. which, if you're confident in their ability to grip when you need them, make you feel a whole lot better about taking more speed in to a corner.

    I would also say however, that you should try a few different bikes out to see which one makes you feel the most confident, don't just buy a bike because it's on 0%... :wink:
    XC: Giant Anthem X
    Fun: Yeti SB66
    Road: Litespeed C1, Cannondale Supersix Evo, Cervelo R5
    Trainer: Bianchi via Nirone
    Hack: GT hardtail with Schwalbe City Jets
  • supersonicsupersonic Posts: 82,708 Lives Here
    I would say the bike is well suited to a lot of Cannock!
  • supersonicsupersonic Posts: 82,708 Lives Here
    I would say the bike is well suited to a lot of Cannock!
Sign In or Register to comment.