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Fitting Carbon Bars to Alu Stem

P-JayP-Jay Posts: 1,478
edited October 2010 in MTB workshop & tech
had a good day in work yesterday and made some money, so treated myself to some second-hand carbon Easton Monkeylight DH Bars for my trail bike (I know they do lighter non-DH versions but I like to overspec occationally).

I was going to whip of my current alu bars, give the stem a wipe, attach the new ones and "give it some pillock" on the bolts.

But now I'm reading about carbon paste and acurate torque settings.

Am I going to be killed to death if I stick to my orginal plan of tightening them 'enough'?

Posts

  • Neily03Neily03 Posts: 295
    You're insane using second hand carbon bars anyway so over tightening them is a bit irrelevant, :lol:
  • DCR00DCR00 Posts: 2,160
    why is he insane ?

    ive just fitted some 2nd hand K-Force to my alu RaceFace stem. I dont have a torque wrench, so i used a bit of trial and error i.e. do up the bolts so the bar is secure, check for movement, and tighten more if needed, a qtr turn at a time
  • P-JayP-Jay Posts: 1,478
    DCR00 wrote:
    why is he insane ?

    ive just fitted some 2nd hand K-Force to my alu RaceFace stem. I dont have a torque wrench, so i used a bit of trial and error i.e. do up the bolts so the bar is secure, check for movement, and tighten more if needed, a qtr turn at a time

    Sounds like a plan to me,

    Cheers.
  • Neily03Neily03 Posts: 295
    DCR00 wrote:
    why is he insane ?

    Because it may have been damaged in previous use but you won't know untill you smash your teeth out on the stem.

    I've been running a pair of Easton Monkeylites for nearly 2 years now but I bought them new, no way would I use a pair of second hand bars carbon or ally, I won't even sell my Easton's when I change them, straight in bin imo.
  • P-JayP-Jay Posts: 1,478
    Neily03


    Don't worry about me, if I'm killed to death I'll be sure to post up about it.

    I've got a full proof testing method anyway! I'm gonna fit 'em, give them a good old shove sitting on the bike and if they don't break, I'll consider them 'mint'.

    Whilst your point is valid, the same could be said about any part and it's safer to only buy new, it's not always ideal.
  • Neily03Neily03 Posts: 295
    P-Jay wrote:
    Whilst your point is valid, the same could be said about any part and it's safer to only buy new, it's not always ideal.

    Buying new bars could work out cheaper than second hand........ have you seen the prices dentists charge! :lol::lol:
  • dennisndennisn Posts: 10,601
    Torque wrenches, carbon paste? On a bicycle? A handlebar and a stem aren't that technical. For that matter, not much on a bike is.
  • DCR00DCR00 Posts: 2,160
    agreed, hence why i didnt use either
  • j_lj_l Posts: 425
    If the carbon is damaged it will most likely show up



    so you will be fine







    Disclamer "please do not sue if you do die or get hurt in any way"

    Thanks
    I'm not old I'm Retro
  • P-JayP-Jay Posts: 1,478
    J L wrote:
    If the carbon is damaged it will most likely show up



    so you will be fine







    Disclamer "please do not sue if you do die or get hurt in any way"

    Thanks

    I suspected so, I figured unlike frames and some other carbon stuff I've at least got a chance to look down the tube for damage too. Big torch the other end.
  • antflyantfly Posts: 3,276
    I would use the paste, that way you don't have to worry about torque or slippage.
    Smarter than the average bear.
  • jairajjairaj Posts: 3,009
    If you dont have a torque wrench then the slowly slowly method should work. remember you really don't need that much torque to stop the bars rotating.

    with regards to the carbon paste, it helps on the really smooth lacquered surfaces on seat posts but a lot of handle bars now have a textured area on the clamp area so you may get away with not using the carbon assembly paste
  • diydiy Posts: 6,473
    I have an alu EA70 stem and EC90 Monkeylite CNC low rise bars. I didn't use any paste, bought new, they were only 50 quid.

    I used copper grease in the bolts and torked up on feel to less tight than usual.

    With the new stem, forks and seat post I have fitted, my bike has actually shed a couple of lb.
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