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Security for bikes

Oliver55Oliver55 Posts: 20
edited October 2010 in Commuting general
Guys,
I'm already getting the toughest D-lock and chain, can you point me in the right direction for alarms?
The idea is it's going to be tough to remove the D lock and chain, the alarms will prevent them even trying or hopefully discourage them sooner or later. A back up for the primary back up.
(best Dlocks- censored . mini )
(best Chain- Almax4 )

Would you consider this the best alarm D-lock?
http://www.shopwiki.co.uk/_Viper+Short+ ... =120182825

Are alarm discs better than alarm D-locks?(harder to remove/disable)
What's the best alarm disc?
http://www.motorbike-security.co.uk/ite ... disc-lock/
http://www.worldofpower.co.uk/Motorcycl ... px#summary
http://www.virtualvillage.co.uk/6mm-mot ... ty%20Alarm
http://www.elitesecuritysupplies.com/ox ... c_lock.jpg

And the best alarm padlock?
http://www.mandp.co.uk/productInfo.aspx?catRef=548132
http://www.brooksbarn.co.uk/XENA-XPL46- ... ARU99.aspx
http://www.busters-accessories.co.uk/pr ... Ref=574330
http://www.elitesecuritysupplies.com/pi ... c_lock.jpg
http://www.elitesecuritysupplies.com/ox ... c_lock.jpg

What do you guys think about those motion alarms that fit to the bike frame?
http://www.twenga.co.uk/dir-Sports,Cycl ... ycle-alarm

Thanks in advance.

Posts

  • PBoPBo Posts: 2,493
    interesting - I can barely remember a discussion about alarms/alarmed locks. In the back of my memory BikeRadar reviewed one which was too easy to disable....

    Don't know whether such lack of interest suggests that alarms aren't that good/useful?
  • Btw, why are so many chains using u-locks as padlocks instead of padlocks?
  • ride_wheneverride_whenever Posts: 13,279
    most padlocks are rubbish, whereas d-locks tend to be a bit better hardened and a lot tougher.

    I use the oxford alarmed mini-d-lock. It's great for coffee stops and you can't accidentally have it go off in your bag due to the arming mechanism.

    The disc alarms are very good but you have to be pretty lucky for them to fit to your bike. Check out (a.k.a. google) the 'LFGSS recommended lock list' for the links to which ones are easier to fit with pics of them in place.
  • What about the lock that comes with the almax4 chain, the squire ss65cs vs the fagettaboutit mini? The censored is 18mm to the squire's 13mm, but its a closed shackle design making croppers much harder to access.

    One reason I ask about the u locks with chains, I see people not filling the space so it could be bottle jacked.

    Compare a u lock and a shackle padlock with same shackle thickness, in that case padlock wins because it can't be bottle jacked, no?

    The abloy (15mm, closed design) seems stronger than the squire:

    http://www.almax-security-chains.co.uk/ ... re+Details

    http://www.lockout-tagout.co.uk/product ... EN+Grade+6
  • Is it true all locks including censored mini, krypto m18 and almax series4 immobiliser chain won't replace the cost of stolen bikes without the broken lock as evidence?
  • Is there anything you can do to your bike to protect yourself if someone tries to get you off your bike by throwing a stick at the wheel?
  • CafewandaCafewanda Posts: 2,788
    OP, is your bike going to be on the street? I would have thought a D-lock, chain and insurance would be enough. Some prayers might help if you are the praying kind.

    http://www.lfgss.com/thread17938-17.html#post1679452
  • I'm not going to leave it outside my house anymore, but it will be left on the street when I'm using it to get about. I've already got the best chain and d lock, but I've had bikes stolen so many times now I'm trying to make my new bike bulletproof. I've even thought about tyre spikes and stoppared spray and handcuffs if I come across a thief/minivan trying to make a getaway. I got a letter from the police only 5days after reporting it stolen they were closing the case. If I have to spend more than the £280 it cost to buy my bike I'll do it. It's already £260 just for a chain and 2d locks and one alarm disc lock.
  • Also, is the 19.85mm untouchable chain stronger than the 19mm quadruple tempered security chain almax?

    Almax:
    19mm quadruple tempered security chain
    *Case hardened (not through hardened)
    *Carbon manganese alloy steel enhanced with boron.
    *Thatcham Approved.
    *Impervious to hand bolt cropper attacks!
    *Hacksaws useless!
    *Zinc plated with gold passivation for maximum corrosion protection.
    *Almax's long link system allows:-
    -You to lock your chain off tight, stopping sledge, wedge and freeze attacks Description

    " Untouchable" .
    Actual link diameter- 19.85mm equal to almost 20mm.
    Unique lasercut end link- enables a wider choice of locks to be used.
    2.0m length mid link chain.
    Highest grade Alloy steel.
    Case hardened process for maximum strength and security.
    Chain weight – 15.80Kg- recommended for “ home use “ due to weight.
    This chain cannot be bolt cropped by hand- 19mm chain will NOT fit into the jaws of the largest bolt croppers.
    This chain cannot be sawn.
    Gold zinc plated finish.
  • PBoPBo Posts: 2,493
    Oliver55 wrote:
    Chain weight – 15.80Kg- recommended for “ home use “ due to weight.

    Dude, hope there are no hills on your commute!!
    Actual link diameter- 19.85mm equal to almost 20mm.
    :lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:

    They should sack the copywriter that came up with that......
  • Oliver55 wrote:
    Is there anything you can do to your bike to protect yourself if someone tries to get you off your bike by throwing a stick at the wheel?

    Very very tough to defend against. Depending on where you live, you should probably also be aware of the dangers of IEDs and RPGs... :wink:
  • ZachariahZachariah Posts: 782
    Seriously, if people trying to physically attack you while you're riding is a real issue for you, I'd recommend living somewhere else rather than worrying about countermeasures (the only one I can think of is to ride in a group with people who would step in to defend you).
  • CafewandaCafewanda Posts: 2,788
    Oliver55 wrote:
    I'm not going to leave it outside my house anymore, but it will be left on the street when I'm using it to get about. I've already got the best chain and d lock, but I've had bikes stolen so many times now I'm trying to make my new bike bulletproof. I've even thought about tyre spikes and stoppared spray and handcuffs if I come across a thief/minivan trying to make a getaway. I got a letter from the police only 5days after reporting it stolen they were closing the case. If I have to spend more than the £280 it cost to buy my bike I'll do it. It's already £260 just for a chain and 2d locks and one alarm disc lock.

    You can't make a bike thief-proof that I know of. The only alternative is not to own one. Enjoy it while you have it and save money for a replacement just in case, or have more than one in your collection. It's a bike not your life, although I'm very attached to mine and would be gutted if it was stolen. My Oyster card is my ultimate back-up.
  • IED's haha :)

    No, my area's sw London not Helmand province/the ghetto, but I heard about the guy that was attacked with the stick and wondered if there was a countermeasure, like a temporary fitting to make the wheels more disc-like.

    Also even in ok-ish areas of London, you're never too far away from a high rise tower block/council estate, according to the police there's been a sharp rise in bike theft in my area, there's young tikes that used to ask me if I was selling my bike/if it was new and I shrugged it off but since the last theft from outside my own property in broad daylight I'm seeing things here differently. The first day I took my newly replaced bike outside to get some fish&chips there was a group of little tikes eating outside the shop and straight away one asked if it was new. I ignored him and actually took the bike into the fish shop. One of his mates answered "yes it is".

    I don't mind the weight from a chain(that may change when I actually try it), I don't travel long distances and the most troublesome journey is to my gym which is 10-15mins with one medium slope (which would probably be a good warm up). I don't use the bike to get to work, it's like my lazyman's A to B to save time walking somewhere or avoid waiting for a bus when you could be there before the bus arrives.
  • If you only travel really short distances, why not buy a tatty bike that no professional thief would touch. Then you only need a robust lock to prevent the opportunist.
    Keep the nice bike for best.
    There are plenty of old beaters around for next to nothing.
  • ZachariahZachariah Posts: 782
    Oliver55 wrote:
    No, my area's sw London not Helmand province/the ghetto, but I heard about the guy that was attacked with the stick and wondered if there was a countermeasure, like a temporary fitting to make the wheels more disc-like.

    I assume you're referring to this report. A horrible attack and one I hope nobody here ever has to face. Made me question what the police are doing round that way to have let things get to the state where this can happen in a public place.

    Realistically, no physical gizmo is going to protect you against a big group of thugs. Panniers would counter the stick-in-the-spokes, but what are you going to do when they block the path in front of you? Try and blast through them? Good luck with that on a bike. The only thing that would have saved the writer in that situation would be a few people on his side stepping in. Even if this had been in a place where concealed weapons are legal, from the account given there would have been no time to draw and use one effectively.
  • If you are commuting regularly, the best way to defend against having a bike stolen is to ride one that no one will steal. Keep you best bikes at home to ride when you go out for a proper ride. My commuter hack looks like a shocker. It is filthy - I have not cleaned it in two years - the wheels do not match, the frame is scratched and knocked about, the bar tape is odd, the crank arms are odd but the same length, mudguards are different colours, there is rust in places, the quill stem has files marks all over it, the saddle is pink etc, yet I ensure it is mechanically sound and safe and it does 1500 miles commute a year. Whatsmore, this Orbit 531 frame, with mavic, rigida wheels and old 105 groupset, only cost £110. I lock it up, but who would steal it when there might be a new mountain bike or Dawes galaxy alongside. In fact there is a 'secure' lock up at work with key code access. Bikes that are left in there are also locked up as well, but some have been stolen, whereas my 'Shocker' is locked to railings out in the open, getting wet, more dirty, more rusty and more of a deterent to thieves.
  • There's so much shite information given out on security. Was in Evans today trying to work out how heavy a lock I was prepared to carry.

    Shop assistant came over to give me advice (which I didn't really want). Advised against a chain as a Kryptoflex cable 'could be cut with bolt cutters.' I told him I didn't think it would stand up to my kitchen scissors...
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,748
    I'm willing to bet no-one would steel my £5.50 (ebay) Townsend 'mountain bike', the daughters boyfriend uses it when they go on rides, apart from replacing a tyre its done about 250miles now for thet £5.50. And it will be at least 30lbs lighter than any bike plus all that security!

    Simon
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