How long until your arse toughens up??

rodgers73
rodgers73 Posts: 2,626
edited September 2010 in Road beginners
I did my first proper ride on my road bike yesterday - work and back (about 45 miles in total) and my arse is killing me today.

I want to do it again next week and eventually several times a week, but not if I'm going to be in permanent agony!

So, how long until I get used to this??

Thanks

Tom

NB - by arse I mean what I think is referred to on here as the sit bone
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Comments

  • It shouldn't be painful for long. What shorts are you wearing? I presume/hope they are padded? Do you know the make/cost of them? I have found a decent pair of shorts make the whole cycling experience a lot more enjoyable.

    Ben
  • neeb
    neeb Posts: 4,470
    If it is the sitbones rather than the sensitive bits in front, most people find that these toughen up fairly quickly. It also helps if your weight is distributed well between the rear and the front - this is influenced by setup, e.g. reach to the bars and saddle/bars drop.
  • Chrissz
    Chrissz Posts: 727
    A couple of weeks tops. If you ride twice a week it will soon adapt.
  • tlw1
    tlw1 Posts: 21,983
    yep - you get used to it!
  • danowat
    danowat Posts: 2,877
    Firsly, padded shorts are a must.

    Secondly, if you are still getting much pain after about two weeks, and you are using padded shorts, you may want to look into a replacement saddle.
  • giant_man
    giant_man Posts: 6,878
    It depends on the saddle and your insert in your shorts, and how often you go out for a ride. Your saddle may not be suitable for your ar$e, but you should give it longer for everything to work.
  • matthew h wrote:
    yep - you get used to it!

    No you don't, if it hurts that much saddle position or just isn't right for you. I tried to give my Fizik Pave a chance, but after a few weeks still horrid to use. Now have Brooks Swallow
    Say... That's a nice bike..
    Trax T700 with Lew Racing Pro VT-1 ;-)
  • Think of it this way, cycling is an endurance sport so its important to be mentally strong aswell as physically strong, I dont think you will be in pain for long but probably just need more time in the saddle! I am just a beginner cyclist but have really taken to the sport but one thing I was thinking is maybe whats causing your pain is that you are splitting your run into two, I know you dont have a choice as your commuting. The longest ride I have done was 51 miles and at the time I felt fine and could have cycled more but later that day my bum was a bit tender and I wouldn't have liked to have had to cycled then! So I wondered was it the homeward journey you suffered the most? If so I think you may just need to get the miles in and just get bike fit!

    Bobby
    getting faster, fitter, and skinnier by the day!
  • Velonutter
    Velonutter Posts: 2,437
    After many years off the bike, I re-started with Fizik Arione's, I honestly thought they were an incarnation from hell!

    I persevered as I had them on all three of my bikes.

    To be really truthful it took over 5000 miles before my sit bones were comfortable, now I go out and do a hundred miles and all I worry about is everything but my sit bones.

    Make sure you stand up on the bike every 10-15 minutes, it allows the blood to return to your under carriage.

    HTH
  • lol. My brooks have been the most comfortable saddles I've ever used, even when new (and rock hard) Doing a 50 miler and getting off the bike I felt like I didn't do a ride at all. No pain no tightness, nothing.

    "standing up every 15 minutes" :roll: I'd look into a new saddle.
    Say... That's a nice bike..
    Trax T700 with Lew Racing Pro VT-1 ;-)
  • simon_e
    simon_e Posts: 1,706
    matthew h wrote:
    yep - you get used to it!

    No you don't, if it hurts that much saddle position or just isn't right for you.
    I agree.

    Could never get on with the saddle on my Giant SCR, even after over a year of trying. Picked up a s/h WTB Deva from ebay after reading some reviews and, although there is less padding, my sit bones are much happier. Was given an old (2005?) Specialized BG saddle which is very comfortable on my old rigid MTB.

    Bid low on ebay or look on here, you'll surely find one that fits you better than what you have.
    Aspire not to have more, but to be more.
  • danowat wrote:
    Firsly, padded shorts are a must.

    Secondly, if you are still getting much pain after about two weeks, and you are using padded shorts, you may want to look into a replacement saddle.

    He never mentioned a saddle.............if he hasn't got one thats the problem :lol::lol:
  • lol. My brooks have been the most comfortable saddles I've ever used, even when new (and rock hard) Doing a 50 miler and getting off the bike I felt like I didn't do a ride at all. No pain no tightness, nothing.

    "standing up every 15 minutes" :roll: I'd look into a new saddle.

    You should be having a stand up every few minutes to keep blood flowing, not just for your arse.

    Instead of telling people they need new saddles after one ride, surely it is more appropriate to see if they are covering the basics frst... it is a beginners forum...
  • You should be having a stand up every few minutes to keep blood flowing, not just for your ars*.

    Every few minutes? :roll: True saddle position could come into it, but if after a ride it feels you've had a sander put to your backside, then I think the saddle is to blame. The difference between my perfectly setup Fizik Pave (and another that was even worse) to quickly bolted on new hard Brooks was night and day. Did 35 miles in one go, first day on B17 and wow luxury.

    Although Brooks might not be for OP some people don't like them. I'd recommend the Team Pro for a slightly more relaxed tourer bike, it's a bit too wide for road bikes (due to being forward a bit) Swallow more suited for them..
    Say... That's a nice bike..
    Trax T700 with Lew Racing Pro VT-1 ;-)
  • danowat
    danowat Posts: 2,877
    BenBlyth wrote:
    lol. My brooks have been the most comfortable saddles I've ever used, even when new (and rock hard) Doing a 50 miler and getting off the bike I felt like I didn't do a ride at all. No pain no tightness, nothing.

    "standing up every 15 minutes" :roll: I'd look into a new saddle.

    You should be having a stand up every few minutes to keep blood flowing, not just for your ars*.

    Really?, so you won't want to be doing any TT's then, can't imagine standing up every few mins is very aero!! :lol:

    If you saddle suits you, and you are wearing decent enough shorts, there is no need to get out of the saddle, I can ride for hours without needing too.
  • Slow-N-Old wrote:
    After many years off the bike, I re-started with Fizik Arione's, I honestly thought they were an incarnation from hell!

    I persevered as I had them on all three of my bikes.

    To be really truthful it took over 5000 miles before my sit bones were comfortable, now I go out and do a hundred miles and all I worry about is everything but my sit bones.

    Make sure you stand up on the bike every 10-15 minutes, it allows the blood to return to your under carriage.

    HTH

    Hello,

    First post on BR. Such excitement.

    Anyway.

    Aye - if circulation is being cut off then stop! Either your position, saddle or chamois is wrong for you. There shouldn't be any pressure on your scruttocks (a.k.a. perenium).

    If you're just getting sore sit bones then back off and build up gradually. Rule of thumb is never increase intensity / ride time by more than 10% per week.

    If you're getting other kinds of soreness, e.g. saddle sore, then the chamois is the most likely culprit.

    That said, your body will become accustomed to riding, and muscles et al do develop over time to help you.

    I refer you to the Oracle: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/saddles.html

    Cheers
  • UpTheWall wrote:
    Slow-N-Old wrote:
    After many years off the bike, I re-started with Fizik Arione's, I honestly thought they were an incarnation from hell!

    I persevered as I had them on all three of my bikes.

    To be really truthful it took over 5000 miles before my sit bones were comfortable, now I go out and do a hundred miles and all I worry about is everything but my sit bones.

    Make sure you stand up on the bike every 10-15 minutes, it allows the blood to return to your under carriage.

    HTH

    Hello,

    First post on BR. Such excitement.

    Anyway.

    Aye - if circulation is being cut off then stop! Either your position, saddle or chamois is wrong for you. There shouldn't be any pressure on your scruttocks (a.k.a. perenium).

    If you're just getting sore sit bones then back off and build up gradually. Rule of thumb is never increase intensity / ride time by more than 10% per week.

    If you're getting other kinds of soreness, e.g. saddle sore, then the chamois is the most likely culprit.

    That said, your body will become accustomed to riding, and muscles et al do develop over time to help you.

    I refer you to the Oracle: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/saddles.html

    Cheers

    PS to check on correct saddle sizing take a trip to the LBS and try out the specialized buttometer. No, really. That'll give you the correct width to work with.
  • Is your riding position correct? With the correct leg length and ride-over sorted you should have a "float" sensation on your saddle. Your full weight shouldn't be on your ars3 :oops:
    CAAD9
    Kona Jake the Snake
    Merlin Malt 4
  • danowat wrote:
    BenBlyth wrote:
    lol. My brooks have been the most comfortable saddles I've ever used, even when new (and rock hard) Doing a 50 miler and getting off the bike I felt like I didn't do a ride at all. No pain no tightness, nothing.

    "standing up every 15 minutes" :roll: I'd look into a new saddle.

    You should be having a stand up every few minutes to keep blood flowing, not just for your ars*.

    Really?, so you won't want to be doing any TT's then, can't imagine standing up every few mins is very aero!! :lol:

    If you saddle suits you, and you are wearing decent enough shorts, there is no need to get out of the saddle, I can ride for hours without needing too.

    If you are riding TT's I presume you understand the reason for having differient types of bikes. I.e. TT vs Sit up and Beg. TT's are not built for comfort.

    My point isn't you should be up and down like a yo yo but every now and then, bearing in mind we are talking about new riders here, you would expect to sometimes be out of the saddle. It builds up diferent muscle groups as well. Each to their own though. If you want to stay sat down all the tiime great. Good for you. I occasionally get out of the saddle, often when climbing and it helps my comfort.
  • danowat
    danowat Posts: 2,877
    need vs want.

    IMO, you shouldn't NEED to get out of the saddle, especially in terms of comfort, climbing is different (but even then, NEED vs want comes into it again), but you should be able to stay seated without being in pain.

    In regards to TT, of course, they are built for speed, but comfort is still a factor, if you aren't comfortable in an aero dynamic position, then you won't be effective, can you imagine doing a 100 mile TT and not being comfortable?, and having to get out of the saddle every few mins?, of course not.
  • What I find is getting ingrowing hairs, which I am not prone to anywhere else, now thats a killer and no idea how to solve it, any ideas, already got a comfy saddle/shorts etc? It's grimm
  • Ollieda
    Ollieda Posts: 1,010
    OP says it was his first proper ride so even if he had the perfect saddle for him then it would still hurt.

    My first saddle hurt like hell even with padded shorts so after a while I switched it and my second one was more comfortable. When I built up my second bike I used the first saddle again as it saved buying a new one for the meantime and now I find that original saddle fine for my commutte and I ride it without padded shorts with no problems!

    Once your sit bones are settled then yes you can tell if a saddle is going to be a problem for you but if you just switch saddles from the off your not really getting a proper judgement.

    To the OP - for me I found that doing a few shorter rides every week had my sit bones more comfortable within a few weeks as opposed to going for the once a week all out ride that i was doing when I first started.
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    Ingrowing hairs can be nasty! Sounds like your post-ride shower should involve judicious use of a pan scourer or similar to make sure the little buggers are all pointing outwards..
  • danowat wrote:
    need vs want.

    IMO, you shouldn't NEED to get out of the saddle, especially in terms of comfort, climbing is different (but even then, NEED vs want comes into it again), but you should be able to stay seated without being in pain.

    In regards to TT, of course, they are built for speed, but comfort is still a factor, if you aren't comfortable in an aero dynamic position, then you won't be effective, can you imagine doing a 100 mile TT and not being comfortable?, and having to get out of the saddle every few mins?, of course not.

    Are you purposely being awkward?

    Of course if I wanted to I could stay sat down. I have been very clear it is only an occasional thing that people may want to get out of the saddle. You don't 'NEED' a saddle at all, you could ride without one if you 'WANTED'.

    Like I have said, it is personal choice. Do you need to tell me how I should be riding my bike? The OP asked for opinions, I gave him mine. It seems odd to say the least to come on and rtell me my opinion is wrong.

    Can't we all just get along? :?
  • danowat
    danowat Posts: 2,877
    Not being awkward at all, just giving an opinion, however, when you state opinion as fact, then there is a problem.....
    You should be having a stand up every few minutes to keep blood flowing, not just for your ars*.

    Indicates that anyone not getting out of the saddle every few minutes is wrong, it isn't.

    As I said, need vs want, of course, if you want to get out of the saddle, then go for it, there is nothing wrong with it at all, but you shouldn't need to, you shouldn't be uncomfortable enough to warrant having to, and if you are, then "you" (not YOU per say) have a problem that needs looking at, be it clothing, or saddle.

    As I said in my original reply, if the OP is still having the issue after two weeks, then start looking at the saddle, I never once said "Ooooo pain on first ride, change saddle" that would be a ridiculous knee-jerk reaction, but the OP shouldn't expect to suffer with saddle pain, or NEED to stand every few mins.
  • danowat wrote:
    Not being awkward at all, just giving an opinion, however, when you state opinion as fact, then there is a problem.....
    You should be having a stand up every few minutes to keep blood flowing, not just for your ars*.

    Indicates that anyone not getting out of the saddle every few minutes is wrong, it isn't.

    As I said, need vs want, of course, if you want to get out of the saddle, then go for it, there is nothing wrong with it at all, but you shouldn't need to, you shouldn't be uncomfortable enough to warrant having to, and if you are, then "you" (not YOU per say) have a problem that needs looking at, be it clothing, or saddle.

    As I said in my original reply, if the OP is still having the issue after two weeks, then start looking at the saddle, I never once said "Ooooo pain on first ride, change saddle" that would be a ridiculous knee-jerk reaction, but the OP shouldn't expect to suffer with saddle pain, or NEED to stand every few mins.

    Some did say that pretty much and instead of scaring him off with the thought of having to get a new saddle I thought it was advisable to try easy things first.

    I probably should have said, "should try standing up every now and again". Having said that, due to the differient muscles worked, getting out of the saddle at times 'I believe' is advisable.
  • rodgers73
    rodgers73 Posts: 2,626
    It's a road bike not a MTB or anything unusual.

    My shorts are Karrimor cycling shorts with a decent thick pad in them.

    It's just ordinary sit-bone ache not saddle sores.

    It was worse coming home rather than going to work - no bother at all on the 1st leg in fact

    I move about a bit in terms of position during the ride due to climbs, hills etc.

    I'm not sure on my set up. I'm 6ft 2 and bought a frame size that is meant to match my inside leg measurement/height (54"? I cant remember but I used various sites to work it out, all of which sounded authoritative!). I think the saddle should be higher than the handkebars - is that right? Mine are almost parallel. No knee or other pain though - just sore bum!

    Thanks for all the comments guys

    Tom
  • If you're 6'2" a 54cm bike is way too small for you, I'm 5'8" and ride two 54cm bikes. Saddle should be adjusted so with your feet clipped in, and crank at 6 o clock you have a slight bend in your knee say 170 degrees
    Say... That's a nice bike..
    Trax T700 with Lew Racing Pro VT-1 ;-)
  • danowat
    danowat Posts: 2,877
    I am around that (6-2 , 6-3) and I ride a 58
  • rodgers73 wrote:

    It was worse coming home rather than going to work - no bother at all on the 1st leg in fact


    Tom

    Tom

    I think as a fellow beginner its most likely more time in the saddle you need to toughen up your behind!
    As I said in my earlier post i can totally relate to that feeling and you can either build up your distances or just bite the bullet and commute and accept the fact that you will be a bit tender on the way home, then maybe give it a month or so and if it persists look into a new saddle Something else I would suggest is take your bike to your LBS for a 6 week or 200 mile service and pay him a little extra to set the bike up for you! The internet is agreat place for information but if your not 100% clued up about bikes then your LBS man is your friend and worth paying a little bit extra in my opinion anyway for your cycling needs!

    Bobby
    getting faster, fitter, and skinnier by the day!