Three questions about my new bike (from a new cyclist)

TheSloog
TheSloog Posts: 50
edited September 2010 in Road beginners
1. I've just bought a 2010 Trek 1.5 and to mine eyes it is a thing of rare beauty. However, it seems to slip up and down between the seventh and eighth gears when going at a comfortable-to-quick pace. There's no problem with the gears above or below. Does this sound like a fault or something I can adjust myself?

2. Is is possible to fit a bigger chainset to get more speed or would the whole groupset need changed?

3. Any advice on a good-value computer?

Comments

  • softlad
    softlad Posts: 3,513
    TheSloog wrote:

    2. Is is possible to fit a bigger chainset to get more speed or would the whole groupset need changed?

    assuming you are on a compact 50/12, you would need to be travelling well over 40mph before you started to spin out - presumably you are already doing this, which is why you need a bigger chainset..?
  • amaferanga
    amaferanga Posts: 6,789
    1. You probably just need to make a small adjustment to the indexing of your gears

    2. Learn to pedal faster! My guess would be that your top gear is 50/12 - this is a big enough gear for racing even. Your fitness will be the limiting factor, not your gearing

    3. Garmin Edge 500 - good VFM, but not cheap
    More problems but still living....
  • 1. I'm also a newb and had a similar issue with my Giant Rapid 3. Saw a post on this site somewhere about how to use gears properly. The thread basically gave an overview of gear/chain alignment *does anyone have this link??*

    2. Pass

    3. I bought this for £12: http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Wireless-Cycle-Co ... 1c0e6c6416 and it's absolutely brilliant so far, not even a problem in the rain.
    Giant Rapid 3
  • Actually, sack the second question – sounds like brave talk on my part (or at the least wishful thinking!).

    For the computer I was hoping for best of the cheapest...
  • danowat
    danowat Posts: 2,877
    I spin my compact out at about 36mph (maybe 110rpm?), but its fine for normal riding, its just a bit on the low side for TT's.
  • rick_chasey
    rick_chasey Posts: 74,716
    danowat wrote:
    I spin my compact out at about 36mph (maybe 110rpm?), but its fine for normal riding, its just a bit on the low side for TT's.

    36mph in a TT?


    480828_M23.jpg
  • danowat
    danowat Posts: 2,877
    danowat wrote:
    I spin my compact out at about 36mph (maybe 110rpm?), but its fine for normal riding, its just a bit on the low side for TT's.

    36mph in a TT?

    Yeah, but not for very long :lol:
  • Go for Halfords cheapest computer. They range from £8 to £12 depending on which sale phase they're in. I've spent loads of money on fancy computers and they have all ground to a halt through time. This cheapo works perfectly and keeps on going. So much so I bought another for MTB - plus club-mates have bought them too.
    Simple - five basic functions.

    The website has them at a tenner just now.
  • tim_wand
    tim_wand Posts: 2,552
    Sounds as if your gears just need indexing. As long as they are travelling the full range of the casette i.e smallest to biggest cog then you dont need to touch the hi low adjuster screws on the mech.

    There should be screw in or out adjustment at both the mech end were the cable feeds in and at the levers were it exits or more usually barrel adjusters on the down tube were the cable is routed. Tinkering any of these adjusters should sort it.

    Remember if its a new bike the cables will stretch over time and these adjustments plus cable tensioning and low and high range adjustment may be necessary further along the line.

    IMO the best value computers are usually cateye. Loads of functions and loads of price points and in my experience easy to fit and bulllet proof.

    Where ever possible you should aim to achieve the gear ratio you want with the chain in the straightest line possible.

    I. e big ring at the front and big ring at the back is not a good combination and will cause chain alingnment and shifting probllems the same gear can be achieved by the middle ring and the middle of the cassette. Same applies with small ring at the front and small ring at the back.

    Enjoy the bike! if you want a 53 chain ring go for it they can be bought seperate you just need to know the PCD (pitch circle diameter) of your chainset / Sheldon Browns website lists most of the common ones.
  • kingrollo
    kingrollo Posts: 3,198
    Woodywmb wrote:
    Go for Halfords cheapest computer. They range from £8 to £12 depending on which sale phase they're in. I've spent loads of money on fancy computers and they have all ground to a halt through time. This cheapo works perfectly and keeps on going. So much so I bought another for MTB - plus club-mates have bought them too.
    Simple - five basic functions.

    The website has them at a tenner just now.

    +1

    Buy a cheap computer - Ive tried quite a few - you end up using the same features anyway - Average MPH, Current MPH, trip & total distance. In my experience the cheaper ones outlast the more expensive ones.

    The exception would be if go the whole hog and get a gps device - I find the virtual pacer function very useful for lone training.
  • Thanks for all the sound advice, chaps...

    ...and on the subject of chaps - anyone know if the cheapo cycling shorts at Decathlon are any use?
    I have a pair of Nalinis which seem decent but... must...have...more...LYCRA!!!!
  • rake
    rake Posts: 3,204
    TheSloog wrote:
    Thanks for all the sound advice, chaps...

    ...and on the subject of chaps - anyone know if the cheapo cycling shorts at Decathlon are any use?
    I have a pair of Nalinis which seem decent but... must...have...more...LYCRA!!!!
    ive got their bibshorts. btwin i think, theyre up to the job.
  • ChrisSA
    ChrisSA Posts: 455
    +1 on the Decathlon shorts.