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Worn Chain Question

CyclingcowboyCyclingcowboy Posts: 65
edited September 2010 in Workshop
Ok, so I managed to throw my chain last week. Took everything to my LBS and they said that they could throw the same chain back on but take out the torn link and it most likely still work. The mechanic checked the chain and it is just at the beginning of the "red zone" on his chain checker, (i.e. area suggesting replacement). But my rear cassette isn't worn that badly. So the question is, do I get the chain put back on, or do I go on and replace the chain and cassette?

Also, how many miles should I expect out of a Shimano 10spd chain and cassette? Any idea?
-The Cowboy

"Courage is being scared to death, but saddling up anyway." -John Wayne

"Converting calories into gas, a bicycle gets the equivalent of 3000 miles per gallon." ~Bill Strickland

Posts

  • Steve2020Steve2020 Posts: 133
    if you get a new chain now (or soon) you won't need a new cassette by the sound of it. If you change the chain in time the cassette should outlast many chains.
  • See this is where I'm confused. The mechanic said if I replaced the chain, I should replace the cassette too. Perhaps posting a picture or two would help? I'll see if I can get some up by the morning.
    -The Cowboy

    "Courage is being scared to death, but saddling up anyway." -John Wayne

    "Converting calories into gas, a bicycle gets the equivalent of 3000 miles per gallon." ~Bill Strickland
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,286
    Pictures won't help. The cassette can be worn enough to cause a new chain to skip, but you can't tell by looking at it.

    I'd try a new chain, and only replace the cassette if it skips.
  • HoopdriverHoopdriver Posts: 2,023
    Of course the mechanic said that. They always do. Spare parts is good high-yield business. There is no automatic reason to buy a new cassette every time you put on a new chain. None at all. I have even overheard one shop mechanic advising new chainrings as well, with each new chain and cassette. And on it goes....

    If you maintain your chain well, and replace it when it reaches that one per cent 'stretch' than there is no reason you cannot get three chains or more to each cassette.
  • Modern cassettes are far superior to the older screw-on types of yore. Those did wear, and rapidly, so changing a chain then meant changing the sprockets as well.

    As folk have already said, with modern kit, just change the chain. I must go through at least six chains per cassette (Usually Ultegra) but I change them quite frequently.
  • Well then I think that settles it. New chain here we come. :)
    -The Cowboy

    "Courage is being scared to death, but saddling up anyway." -John Wayne

    "Converting calories into gas, a bicycle gets the equivalent of 3000 miles per gallon." ~Bill Strickland
  • Ok, so here's part deux of the whole issue...

    Got a new chain. Got a Shimano 105 chain instead of ordering an Ultegra simply because they had one in stock and cut me a deal on it to get it out the door. Went on the first long ride today. In the big 4 rings in my cassette, I could feel the chain slip and skip a little. Then when I got to a bridge, I couldn't even use them because of how badly they were slipping. So the question is... compatibility issue between a 105 chain and ultegra cassette, or time to buy a new cassette?
    -The Cowboy

    "Courage is being scared to death, but saddling up anyway." -John Wayne

    "Converting calories into gas, a bicycle gets the equivalent of 3000 miles per gallon." ~Bill Strickland
  • Garry HGarry H Posts: 6,614
    Apologies in advance for hijacking the thread, have a similar problem. Just had LBS replace a chain (Normally replace them myself, but they had the bike in for something else, before anybody thinks I'm completely useless and unable to replace a chain) on a three month old cassette and it's jumping any time I put some weight on the pedals (It's worse in the 39 than it is in the 53). Took a close look at the chain whilst turning the pedals, and it looks like it's sticking in the cogs, ie almost as if the chain was too wide for the cassette. The only thing I can think of is that it's a 9spd chain for a 10spd cassette.

    Can anybody think of any other reason for this to happen? Before I go mouthing off at the LBS...
  • However much you dont like it. If you change the chain you need a new cassette too. You can often get away with old chainrings but what you both describe is classic chain slip due to worn sprockets.
  • Garry HGarry H Posts: 6,614
    However much you dont like it. If you change the chain you need a new cassette too. You can often get away with old chainrings but what you both describe is classic chain slip due to worn sprockets.

    Cassettes should last more than three months, surely? Usually replace chain every 2-3 months and cassette every 6 months. Never had same problem previously.
  • what are you using for bike lube? Liquid sandpaper? :-/ chain and cassettes should last a few years.
    Say... That's a nice bike..
    Trax T700 with Lew Racing Pro VT-1 ;-)
  • Why is it on all these posts the LBS (usually qualified & experienced) bike mechanic is always wrong and a shyster according to you people? And all you amatuers out there know better - is this why you have to put posts on here asking basic questions about stuff as 'amateur expert's you should know the answer to rather than relying on the obviously less experienced and inferior professional bike mechanic who is trying to screw you to make £2-3 profit on that 'unecessary' cassette???You'd be the first to complain when they've fitted a new chain abnd given you it back and then the gears jump all over the place and you then have to take it back again :cry:
  • deswellerdesweller Posts: 5,271
    Well, I guess I get about 6,000 miles or so out of a cassette/chain. It does sound as though you've got the classic symptoms of a worn cassette though.

    Nigel Bennett, I'm surprised that you think that modern drivetrains are stronger than old 6-speed and 7-speed equipment. Between narrower chains and the increasing emphasis on marketing for fast road bikes rather than utility vehicles I am struggling to see that improvements in materials and design would compensate in the manner you suggest.
    - - - - - - - - - -
    On Strava.{/url}
  • nmcgannnmcgann Posts: 1,780
    wheelygood wrote:
    .....You'd be the first to complain when they've fitted a new chain abnd given you it back and then the gears jump all over the place and you then have to take it back again :cry:

    That's the thing - a bike shop mechanic will err on the safe side and replace chain+cassette as they want you to be satisfied with the work and not come back complaining the gears slip. There's probably not that many customers for simple maintenance such as chain/cassette replacements that are interested in ways of maximising their drivetrain life while spending the minimum amount.
    --
    "Because the cycling is pain. The cycling is soul crushing pain."
  • mrushtonmrushton Posts: 5,182
    You can a lot of miles out of 1 x chain/cassette but both will be worn out. Just replaced a cassette where 2 of the teeth are seriously worn on 2 x sprockets. One solution is to buy cheaper chains and bin them when they get to part worn (50%?). Other people run say 3 chains, changing every eg 300 miles. That way you get a run of 3 x chains and 1 x cassette before replacement. Of course , lots of gear changing leads to wear. Fixed bikes with their thick chain/sprocket and no side-side movt. wear slowly
    M.Rushton
  • wheelygood wrote:
    Why is it on all these posts the LBS (usually qualified & experienced) bike mechanic is always wrong and a shyster according to you people?

    The only reason I ask around is that I have been shafted by an LBS Mechanic before. I've since changed to a different LBS, and I figured it would just be worth it to double check and see.
    -The Cowboy

    "Courage is being scared to death, but saddling up anyway." -John Wayne

    "Converting calories into gas, a bicycle gets the equivalent of 3000 miles per gallon." ~Bill Strickland
  • You've got two choices. Either change chains and cassettes together and run them into the ground - the cassette will wear quicker than it would but you'll get longer out of your chain because it'll wear with the cassette. The downside is if you swop wheels around on your bikes you may be damaging a new cassette with a shagged chain or find your cassette wont work with a chain on another bike. You'll probably also wear your chainrings quicker by using such a worn chain.

    The other choice is to change your chain every so often - I reckon a couple of thousand miles - that way you should get around three chains to one cassette. Ideally I suppose you would run the three chains changing them every few hundred miles so they wear together but that's just a bit too much aggro for me.

    it's a hard life if you don't weaken.
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,286
    Shouldn't be a compatibility problem between 105 chain and Ultegra cassette, as long as they are the same speed.

    Sounds like the cassette is worn then :(
  • dennisndennisn Posts: 10,367
    See this is where I'm confused. The mechanic said if I replaced the chain, I should replace the cassette too. Perhaps posting a picture or two would help? I'll see if I can get some up by the morning.

    In your first post you said "my rear cassette isn't worn that badly". Was this your opinion or the mech's? :? :? :?
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