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New Chain

stuman69erstuman69er Posts: 30
edited August 2010 in Commuting chat
Real quick.

was originally looking at loosing a 100g or so by buying a better lighter chain and have now heard rumors that gold Ti Nitride coated chains need a lot less maintenance than normal steel ones?

ie. no lubing or greasing ect? as the winter is coming this would be an awesome upgrade if it's true. can anybody shed some light?

Posts

  • gbsahne001gbsahne001 Posts: 1,962
    The reviews don't seem that great, nor does it seem to suggest no maintenance;-

    review
    I was wondering if this chain holds what it "say's" TIn coating means usualy very hard and very durable. But after 100Km bike riding the coating was gone! I visited the Bike show in Taipeh, and have mentioned this to the guys of KMC. The sales guy promissed me to discuss this with the development, and finally give me a feedback.

    spec
    * Yumeya is Japanese for dream workshop, and Yumeya delivers on these dreams with the ultimate lightweight and efficient aftermarket upgrades for your XTR components
    * Hollow pin with Ti-Nitride plated inner links reduce weight to 294 grams while improving durability
    * Ti-Nitride coating reduces friction at the rollers between the chain plates, while microscopic pores in the surface hold lube for longer
    * 9-speed Hyperglide compatible

    and at £40 - £60 (that's more than my chain, cassette and new chainset cost) seems like an expensive investment but I do cycle on a shoestring
  • ...but I do cycle on a shoestring

    9spd shoestring? nice :D
    FCN16 - 1970 BSA Wayfarer

    FCN4 - Fixie Inc
  • SimonAHSimonAH Posts: 3,730
    Potentialy some diamond-like thin film pvd coatings could be used to dramatically reduce chain wear - but I think that the primary method of chain failure is stretch not wear? Surface engineering won't help that.

    TiN coatings are indeed very hard (often used on plastic injection mould tooling) but I can't personally see it giving much of an advantage on a bike chain - particularly as it's likely to be on the level of the gold coloured drill bits that you can buy in pound shops. They may as well be coated with tin as with TiN.

    ....and you would definitely still need to use lube I'm afraid.

    If you don't want to have a greasy chain, don't want to use lube and want minimum (read zero) maintenance over winter go Gates carbon drive. 'Tis the future.
    FCN 5 belt driven fixie for city bits
    CAADX 105 beastie for bumpy bits
    Litespeed L3 for Strava bits

    Smoke me a kipper, I'll be back for breakfast.
  • wgwarburtonwgwarburton Posts: 1,863
    SimonAH wrote:
    ...- but I think that the primary method of chain failure is stretch not wear?
    No- it's definitely wear. We call it chain stretch 'cos that's what it looks like but it really isn't. What happens is that the rollers inside the links wear away, so you get a "notch" effect where the links rub together. There are some nice pictures on Sheldon Brown(RiP)'s site of extreme examples.
    ....and you would definitely still need to use lube I'm afraid.

    If you don't want to have a greasy chain, don't want to use lube and want minimum (read zero) maintenance over winter go Gates carbon drive. 'Tis the future.

    Could well be. I'd like to experiment, but don't have a suitable frame.

    Cheers,
    W.
  • i was looking at bikes which could accept a carbon drive but nothing jumped out at me for what i wanted. I've done a bit of searching for conversions ect. but once again nothing jumped out at me.

    any ideas?

    in the case that TiN chains aren't worth the agro' what chain would you guys recommend for lightweight durability?

    also, does anybody have a good link for tuning chain lines?

    i believe the spacer i have on the back is one by Da Bomb and doesn't look like its adjustable?
  • supersonicsupersonic Posts: 82,708 Lives Here
    A typical full link 9spd titanium chain weighs about 230g and costs over £200. A typical steel one weighs 290g and costs £15. So for weight savings, chains aren't usually the best place for it lol.

    I buy the cheapest SRAM I can get my hands on, and change them well before they have worn. The more expensive SRAMs do have plated links to reduce corrosion, but if you are not running them into the ground then isn't a problem.

    Hollowpin is a little lighter, cross-step is20% stronger. But for me, cheap chains, and change them before they 'stretch' too much.
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