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What techniques for clipping out of SPD-SL Road Pedals

sparkmansparkman Posts: 74
edited August 2010 in Road beginners
Despite all I have said I thought I would give clippless another try. This time I have fitted shimano PD5700 SPD-SLs to my roadie, and bought the shoes to suit.

Interesting thing I found that with the crank arm at the top of the pedal stroke. Its easier to clipp out with an inward action of my heal rather than outward. Obviously this wont work so well with the pedal at the bottom of the stroke because your heel hits the crank arm. So the normal outward heel action is better. It does seem that with SPD-SLs unclipping with the pedal in the downward position is the easier option.
What do you guys find :? . Cus considering the comments about clippless around the forum, I really feel I would like to master it. :(
Thanks for any advise :)

Posts

  • Mister WMister W Posts: 791
    I can't say I've ever really thought about it. I just unclip as I need to, wherever the pedal is. However, I found it better to twist your heel out and new pedals are always a little tight.
  • sundogsundog Posts: 243
    Are there warnings about NOT clipping/unclipping with the inward heel action?

    And what he said above, just make sure your pedal tension is fully adjusted to the slackest setting.
    I like white bikes
  • sparkmansparkman Posts: 74
    sundog wrote:
    Are there warnings about NOT clipping/unclipping with the inward heel action?

    And what he said above, just make sure your pedal tension is fully adjusted to the slackest setting.

    Ok so what are the warnings ? as I see it the design of the cleat and pedal are mirror image, so why would clipping out with an inward heel action (pedal position permiting) be a problem.
    You have made me curious sundog :wink:

    Also, although this article relates to mtb I find the other side to the clippless argument interesting.
    http://www.bikejames.com/strength/flats ... let-it-go/
  • father_jackfather_jack Posts: 3,509
    Crash? :lol:
    Say... That's a nice bike..
    Trax T700 with Lew Racing Pro VT-1 ;-)
  • derosaderosa Posts: 2,819

    Big H

    May the road rise up to meet you.
    May the wind always be at your back.
  • ProssPross Posts: 34,877
    I wouldn't normally want to unclip the foot that is at the top of a pedal stroke so I unclip by moving my heel out but I don't think there's any issue with unclipping by twisting your heel in.
  • landrewlandrew Posts: 69
    If you unclip inwards there may be a possibillity of catching your shoes in the spokes. All the advice above is good, keep the tension slack and practice a lot on quiet roads. The other advice I would give is unclip in advance of stopping if you can until you get used to them.

    If you are unconvinced about the benefits of clipless pedals and find they are causing you problems then why not go back to flat pedals.
    Andy
  • nico79nico79 Posts: 22
    I have just recently started to use clipless pedals and i love them.

    I have the pedals set on their slackest setting and don't find un-clipping them a problem.

    As has already been mentioned just go out on some quite roads and practice with them first.
  • sparkmansparkman Posts: 74
    landrew wrote:
    If you unclip inwards there may be a possibillity of catching your shoes in the spokes. All the advice above is good, keep the tension slack and practice a lot on quiet roads. The other advice I would give is unclip in advance of stopping if you can until you get used to them.

    If you are unconvinced about the benefits of clipless pedals and find they are causing you problems then why not go back to flat pedals.

    The setting is at minimum tension, and I now have the cleats float positioned to favour a clip outward action now, so see how it goes.
    I am yet to see any real advantage over a cage arrangement with the strap snug, but not to tight so your foot pulls out easier.
    Having spent a small fortune on shoes and spd and spd- sl set ups I will give it a good go.
    Especially when so many feel they are an advantage. In the end though, its the enjoyment of cycling and maintaining a respectable level of fittness that's my primary goal.
    So the jury is still out, and yes Landrew if they are not for me I will have no problems going back. I was more than happy with the arrangement for many years, and after all I am not out to win any races. :D
  • My left foot is always last in/first out when starting & stopping. I always try to unclip my left a few seconds ahead when I know I'll have to stop, twisting outwards at bottom of stroke, unless it's an emergency...
  • jeepiejeepie Posts: 495
    I used to have look cheapo pedals - just the basic ones that came with my bike - I rode with them for 3 years and I used to unclip by turning my heel in at the top of the pedal stroke of the left foot. If you can I'd avoid doing it as it's not as versatile a technique i.e. you must unclip when the pedal is at the top of the stroke so if you fall the wrong way you are in trouble, you must prepare to unclip and so on....
  • TommyEssTommyEss Posts: 1,855
    sparkman wrote:
    sundog wrote:
    Are there warnings about NOT clipping/unclipping with the inward heel action?

    And what he said above, just make sure your pedal tension is fully adjusted to the slackest setting.

    Ok so what are the warnings ? as I see it the design of the cleat and pedal are mirror image, so why would clipping out with an inward heel action (pedal position permiting) be a problem.
    You have made me curious sundog :wink:

    Also, although this article relates to mtb I find the other side to the clippless argument interesting.
    http://www.bikejames.com/strength/flats ... let-it-go/

    Like turning your heel into your rear wheel - most people unclip before they've come to a complete halt, to avoid the dreaded, yet ubiquitous, clipless moment, so if you turn IN rather than OUT (and away) you're risking all kinds of trouble.
    Cannondale Synapse 105, Giant Defy 3, Giant Omnium, Giant Trance X2, EMC R1.0, Ridgeback Platinum, On One Il Pompino...
  • cedar404cedar404 Posts: 176
    I have only been using clipless pedals for about 2 months but to disengage I twist my heel inwards - I have learnt that the best time (or only time) to do this is when the pedal is at 12 o'clock.

    I find it really difficult to disengage by twisting my heel outwards - I think it might be a flexibility in my knee problem ? I don't want to increase the float as I find it weird when I am climbing out of the saddle - feels like mt feet will slip out.

    Anyway heel inwards works for me.
  • JD_76JD_76 Posts: 236
    If all else fails, get your knee down first :D

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BoNre8Eqnq0
  • Used these pedals a while back before going back to Time and the are a bit tricky to clip in and clip out of (that's the Shimanos, not the Time). But you might try lifting yourself off the saddle a bit, you can then move your whole body slightly rather than just twist from the knee down. Not great in all circumstances, but maybe worth a try?
  • ride_wheneverride_whenever Posts: 13,279
    I do both, by preference i unclip at the top of the stroke inwards, but am quite happy unclipping outwards at the bottom as well.

    For me it's to do with poor hip flexibility meaning i really struggle to clip out at the top.
  • sparkmansparkman Posts: 74
    cedar404 wrote:
    I have only been using clipless pedals for about 2 months but to disengage I twist my heel inwards - I have learnt that the best time (or only time) to do this is when the pedal is at 12 o'clock.

    I find it really difficult to disengage by twisting my heel outwards - I think it might be a flexibility in my knee problem ? I don't want to increase the float as I find it weird when I am climbing out of the saddle - feels like mt feet will slip out.

    Anyway heel inwards works for me.

    That's exactly what I was talking about also Cedar. As you say clipping out with an inward heel action, whilst coasting with your foot at the 12 o clock position does seem easier. An outward action with the foot at 6 o clock is a different matter (much easier)
    Its just that outward at 12 o clock is a bit touch and go, becauase the amount of movement I have only just manages to disengage. Of course at 12 o clock you wont have any trapped in your wheel spokes problems, because your heel is opposite the frames triangle, and not the wheel. In fairness I would imagine we only unclip whilst coasting, because we're about to stop. My logic being our feet will either be at 6 or 12 o clock anyway. Main thing is, it wont damage the cleat or pedal mechanisms using this method.
  • TommyEssTommyEss Posts: 1,855
    sparkman wrote:
    My logic being our feet will either be at 6 or 12 o clock anyway. Main thing is, it wont damage the cleat or pedal mechanisms using this method.

    Fair point - sorry - I normally commute on a fixed wheel - so when thinking back to what I did this morning it was a very different scenario - yes - normally at either 6 or 12 o'clock.

    If I've stopped and myfoots is at 12 I too normally turn heel in to be honest, as I'm leaning the bike over to swing my leg over.

    And on fixed, when coming up to lights, I normally unclip at the bottom of the stroke, heel out, as the pedal's coming up.
    Cannondale Synapse 105, Giant Defy 3, Giant Omnium, Giant Trance X2, EMC R1.0, Ridgeback Platinum, On One Il Pompino...
  • sparkmansparkman Posts: 74
    If you think about it, its a similar situation to toe overlap.
    Yes in theory, if your pedal is in the 3 o'clock position the front of your foot could bind on your front wheel when its turned at a sharp angle from the frame. But in the real world, what the hell kind of riding position would you be in for this to become a problem.

    Glad I'm not the only one using a heel inward action though, Its probably that you guys are so use to it that you do it without even thinking about it. Thats my problem at the moment, Im thinking about it. :oops:
    Mind you, its when I stop thinking about it that Im likely to end up with profanities followed by a dose of gravel rash. :shock: :oops: :lol:
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