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Lactic acid build up how to combat?

j_lj_l Posts: 425
edited September 2010 in Health, fitness & training
Hi Folks I hope you can help

I have cycled for years, since the age of 12 on BMX, then Road in TT's / Track then MTB race, day rides etc. (now 37) and after a three year gap due to family commitments and other distractions I am back on the bike and loving it.

My general fitness is better than I imagined but one thing I have never experienced before is the build up of Lactic acid in my legs whilst descending, on Sunday I did a local route on my own and the last down of the day was a blinder, however as I got towards the bottom of the hill my legs were in agony it didn't stop me but it did get my attention, is it a general lack of fitness etc. or is there something I can do specifically to reduce / sort it?

Thanks in advance.

Jon
I'm not old I'm Retro

Posts

  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    It will get easier over time, and the more you ride.
    Make sure you drink plenty of fluids to help minimise it in the meantime.
  • Have you positioned your feet over the pedals correctly? When my cleats are too far foreward I can get burning thighs and claves.

    Try getting the balls of your feet over the pedal axles, that sorts me out on both flats and spds
  • j_lj_l Posts: 425
    Have you positioned your feet over the pedals correctly? When my cleats are too far foreward I can get burning thighs and claves.

    Try getting the balls of your feet over the pedal axles, that sorts me out on both flats and spds

    My feet are in the same place they have always been, but that said I will look at it as a possible factor. Thanks

    yeehaamcgee, I figured it was something like that, I do drink loads but still maybe not enough on a ride as I never need to stop for a wizz.

    Thanks for info
    I'm not old I'm Retro
  • timpoptimpop Posts: 394
    What do you drink? If you're not already drinking a carb/electrolyte mix or something then I'd say have a go at that too. You'll find with the right drink you'll replace the bits you've lost during the ride. If you are already in the mix then perhaps up the dose. The right drink mix will help reduce muscle fatigue and increase stamina etc.

    That said, you will notice improvements the more you get out. After I took a break I felt the same but things get much better. Training for an endurance event now and things are going fairly well.

    You're getting old too :wink:
    Many happy trails!
  • ride_wheneverride_whenever Posts: 13,279
    to prevent lactic acid build up get fitter or do some lactate tolerance training!

    You say you only got it badly on the last downhill, were you absolutely hammering it? Probably just moving above your threshold power
  • j_lj_l Posts: 425
    Tim pop, thanks for info I am just on water at the moment but might try some form of addiative, oh and my mrs did remind me a was getting old too, thanks :lol:

    ride_whenever, yep giving it everything I could as I knew it was a blinder, there were some quite bumpy setions too which didnt help. lactate tolerance training explain?

    Thanks
    I'm not old I'm Retro
  • ride_wheneverride_whenever Posts: 13,279
    Interval training. It sort of helps with the buildup, but is designed to condition you to deal with it better.

    You go above your threshold power for a set period of time, short respite to recover a bit then repeat to puking or thereabouts.

    If you want a more details head over to the roadie training section as they're a bit more scientific about the whole training lark.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    Training is not very "mountain bikey" though.
    Road CYCLISTS
    Mountain BIKERS.

    Quite a difference in attitudes :lol:
  • j_lj_l Posts: 425
    Training is not very "mountain bikey" though.
    Road CYCLISTS
    Mountain BIKERS.

    Quite a difference in attitudes :lol:

    haha, is it still like that, we (me and mates) used to turn up to the local 10mile TT on our Mountain Bikes, the Road riders didn’t take a very kind view to our mocking.

    I will have a look over the "other side" and see what they have to say.

    Thanks again




    I like it here, its very friendly :D
    I'm not old I'm Retro
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    Well, generally, roadies are ok. Some most definitely aren't though.
    The funny thing is, whilst the same can be said of MTBers towards roadies, it tends to be the teenage "scene" kids who give sh*t to roadies, whereas when I've got grief from road riders, it's invariably been grown men!

    Only yesterday, in fact, whilst I was sticking my mountain bike on the back of the car to head out, a roadie (who I actually know, from the village) passed me. I said "Hi!", and he spat at me!
    He missed, but still...
    What a cnut. :lol:
  • j_lj_l Posts: 425

    Only yesterday, in fact, whilst I was sticking my mountain bike on the back of the car to head out, a roadie (who I actually know, from the village) passed me. I said "Hi!", and he spat at me!
    He missed, but still...
    What a cnut. :lol:

    WTF, really, :shock:
    I'm not old I'm Retro
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    yes, really!
    He always was a walker, but seems he's gone beyond a bit.
  • Should chased him and rubbed his nose in it dirty git
  • rhyko7rhyko7 Posts: 781
    it is lack of fitness, just a case of your legs getting used to it really
    there are some things you can consider that will lessen the affect somewhat:
    1) use less force, either go up slower on the steeper bits or pedal a bit faster rather than really forcing the pedals around-try to use less strength and you shouldt get as many micr tears in your muscles or produce as much bi-product in your legs
    2) keep the heart rate down, the higher the heart rate the more latctate you are producing, just by going 5% slower you will notice a big difference, this especially applies on the steeper sections
    3)stay well hydrated, this doesn't just mean water, i mean carbohydrates and electrolytes

    but as said the more you ride the easier it becomes-you could train, but theres no fun in that
    hope that helps
    Dont look at it-ride it! they are tools not f*cking ornaments

    my riding:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/rhyspect

    Some of my Rides Data/maps:
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  • j_lj_l Posts: 425
    Thanks fellas all advice much appreciated, I did some stuff at Haldon yesterday eve and found my proformance much improved.

    I have also been on a bit of a diet so carrying a bit less bulk too which I assume will help.




    I love Bananas :D
    I'm not old I'm Retro
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    bananas.
    There's an avatar pic of a gorilla, and the word BANANAS next to it!
    Genius :lol:
  • skullthawskullthaw Posts: 321
    i used to have a similar problem after i had been on feildtrips with a lot of walking, the muscles need to get used to the different usage ity is probably that if it gets me in 2 weeks then three years it will definatly,
    as a bove bananas and particually flapjaks, mmmmm.
    2 Broken fingers broken again... [email protected]$%^£g hell that hurt!!!

    92% of teenagers have turned to rap. If your one of the 8% that still listens to real music put this in your sig.
    METAL!!!!!
  • supergrasssupergrass Posts: 123
    i read in my mum and dads Paper ages ago that Bi Carb of soda does the trick, and top athletes use it. always tempted to try it, but i also read it can give you a dodgy tummy and dont fancy needing to go halfway around a ride
  • supergrass wrote:
    i read in my mum and dads Paper ages ago that Bi Carb of soda does the trick, and top athletes use it. always tempted to try it, but i also read it can give you a dodgy tummy and dont fancy needing to go halfway around a ride

    That's called soda loading - plenty to read if you Google.
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