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Riding in California - First Aid Requirements?

LTheisingerLTheisinger Posts: 190
edited July 2010 in MTB general
I am off the California in a few weeks time to ride some of their singletrack and was just wondering whether anyone on here has any experience of riding there?

If so, I am just putting together the list of first aid requirements I need to keep on board whilst riding, the usual stuff like bandages, saline cleaning solution, stitching stuff, bite stuff etc. goes without saying - but I have heard about 'Poison Oak', so do I need stuff for this? And can you think of anything else that would be useful to have on board?

Any help would be great and thanks in advance.

[Title typo fixed so it makes sense - da management]

Posts

  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    dunno about poisin oak, but I have one very useful reccomendation for you.
    It's basically a spray on skin, or plaster if you will.
    It can glue minor cuts back together (stings like all hell when you spray it on though) and seal them up to stop any censored getting in there.
    It comes in a tiny aerosol spray bottle, and will easily fit in a camelbak - fantastic stuff.
  • ceecee Posts: 4,553
    dunno about poisin oak, but I have one very useful reccomendation for you.
    It's basically a spray on skin, or plaster if you will.
    It can glue minor cuts back together (stings like all hell when you spray it on though) and seal them up to stop any censored getting in there.
    It comes in a tiny aerosol spray bottle, and will easily fit in a camelbak - fantastic stuff.

    or use superglue....cheaper, and smaller. might not be as kind to skin!
    Whenever I see an adult on a bicycle, I believe in the future of the human race.

    H.G. Wells.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    superglue can stick cuts together, yeah. But this can become a second skin of sorts. It's amazing on blisters.
  • underdogunderdog Posts: 292
    Superglue was invented for this reason, to be used on the battle field to patch up wounds.
  • ceecee Posts: 4,553
    superglue can stick cuts together, yeah. But this can become a second skin of sorts. It's amazing on blisters.

    blisters....

    ah...I tend to use compeed for those...

    might have a look see for some liquid skin...see if its better. ta.
    Whenever I see an adult on a bicycle, I believe in the future of the human race.

    H.G. Wells.
  • bails87bails87 Posts: 12,998
    Yeah, spray plaster is useful. As said, it stings like hell though!
    MTB/CX

    "As I said last time, it won't happen again."
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    bails87 wrote:
    Yeah, spray plaster is useful. As said, it stings like hell though!
    Is that what's it's called? I bought mine in France, and only have limited knowledge of the language, so the whole thing is gibberish to my brain!
  • bails87bails87 Posts: 12,998
    Yeah, I'm sure it's "Spray-on Plaster". I think Elastoplast started it, but it didn't take long for Boots etc to come up with cheaper versions.
    MTB/CX

    "As I said last time, it won't happen again."
  • LTheisingerLTheisinger Posts: 190
    Thanks for the'Spray-on-Plaster tip - think that's a good idea - cheers!!
  • GHillGHill Posts: 2,402
    You can buy something from Walgreens or Rite-Aid if you're unfortunate enough to trample through some poison oak/ivy. I wouldn't take anything with you.

    Make sure you have some decent health insurance, the hospital bills can be crippling, even for something pretty minor.
  • LTheisingerLTheisinger Posts: 190
    GHill wrote:
    You can buy something from Walgreens or Rite-Aid if you're unfortunate enough to trample through some poison oak/ivy. I wouldn't take anything with you.

    Make sure you have some decent health insurance, the hospital bills can be crippling, even for something pretty minor.

    Thanks buddy - the poison ivy/oak thing worth knowing, saving weight etc! And as for the health insurance, yep I agree! Paid up for a pretty comprehensive package from Virgin covering the mtb etc.!
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    Are you going to be doing any DHing?
    Very, very few insurance companies cover that, I found out. If you are, you're best off going with someone like Dogtag.
  • LTheisingerLTheisinger Posts: 190
    Are you going to be doing any DHing?
    Very, very few insurance companies cover that, I found out. If you are, you're best off going with someone like Dogtag.

    Might creep into doing some larger stuff, but mainly 'All Mountain' and I have Virgin covering 'All Types' of MTB, except you are not allowed to race....which won't be happening.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    Have you checked the small print? I was surprised at what most do NOT cover.
  • upinsmokeupinsmoke Posts: 278
    From Virgin Money;

    Mountain biking (not including downhill racing and extreme terrain)

    I'm going with Dogtag or the other one.
  • NorthwindNorthwind Posts: 14,675
    It's probably more useful learning what poison-oak and poison-ivy look like, rather than carrying around stuff to deal with the results of not knowing what they look like ;)
    Uncompromising extremist
  • tbh in first aid kit you just really need the following.

    water from backpack, to clean wound.

    dressing.gourge i belive it called,(padded one side shiny other side) to put on cuts and wounds.

    bandage but make sure you know how to tie on, no granny knots please lol.

    bassically just basic things to stop bleeding and cuts,


    DONT USE SUPER GLUE.... :shock: the stock super glue in shops ISNT for first aid and WILL cause big problems, if you really feel you want to DIY big cuts and wounds buy some "butterfly stitches" and use them

    http://www.nhs.uk/chq/Pages/1051.aspx?C ... goryID=727

    superglue is bad idea so please dont use it, as it will RIP and TEAR your skin along with infecting the wound with the chemical sealant. trust me it bad idea.
    London2Brighton Challange 100k!
    http://www.justgiving.com/broxbourne-runners
  • LTheisingerLTheisinger Posts: 190
    upinsmoke wrote:
    From Virgin Money;

    Mountain biking (not including downhill racing and extreme terrain)

    I'm going with Dogtag or the other one.

    Thanks buddy, I have paid an extra £25 to cover 'extreme sports' and this covers all Mountain biking (inc. extreme terrain) with the exception of racing, but I did have to call them - I couldn't do it online as it was not a standard cover on the policy and I have since read the 'small print' and all is ok.
  • LTheisingerLTheisinger Posts: 190
    Northwind wrote:
    It's probably more useful learning what poison-oak and poison-ivy look like, rather than carrying around stuff to deal with the results of not knowing what they look like ;)

    I am happy that I can identify what poison ivy/oak looks like I have done this research, I have also done the research on what I need for remedies etc. However, there are mtb'ers on here that ride in california so the post was to find out if they have any other suggestions (i.e. Grannies remedy that works a treat etc. etc. :) )
  • LTheisingerLTheisinger Posts: 190
    tbh in first aid kit you just really need the following.

    water from backpack, to clean wound.

    dressing.gourge i belive it called,(padded one side shiny other side) to put on cuts and wounds.

    bandage but make sure you know how to tie on, no granny knots please lol.

    bassically just basic things to stop bleeding and cuts,


    DONT USE SUPER GLUE.... :shock: the stock super glue in shops ISNT for first aid and WILL cause big problems, if you really feel you want to DIY big cuts and wounds buy some "butterfly stitches" and use them

    http://www.nhs.uk/chq/Pages/1051.aspx?C ... goryID=727

    superglue is bad idea so please dont use it, as it will RIP and TEAR your skin along with infecting the wound with the chemical sealant. trust me it bad idea.

    Thanks mate - don't worry I won't be using the 'sock super-glue'! They do a medical version which I can get if I need it, but I am with you....it will be bandages etc. & having a wife as a nurse I am ok with how to tie etc. I can even stitch wounds if need be, as I have been shown/trained how do this if need be (plus I will be carrying butterfly stitches).
  • bearfraserbearfraser Posts: 435
    good luck with it :lol::lol::lol:
  • bearfraserbearfraser Posts: 435
    remember the "Tywraps" and a wire saw
  • LTheisingerLTheisinger Posts: 190
    bearfraser wrote:
    remember the "Tywraps" and a wire saw

    You star!!! I was just writing the list of stuff we will need and "Tie-wraps" are an MTB essential!!!
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    Tie wraps can also be used to hold enormous cuts and gouges together in an emergency.
    The shocking thing is, I'm not even joking.
  • LTheisingerLTheisinger Posts: 190
    Tie wraps can also be used to hold enormous cuts and gouges together in an emergency.
    The shocking thing is, I'm not even joking.

    That is also a very good point sir!
  • Tom BartonTom Barton Posts: 516
    A good bandage is useful - can be used to strap up a bigger wound or when used with a well chosen stick can make a splint for a broken arm etc.

    A triangle 'sling' bandage is useful also for broken arms (humerus especially), collar bones etc.

    Couple of plasters or the spray glue stuff for minor cuts and scrapes.

    A survival blanket (the silver/gold ones you see ppl in after marathons) they are about £5 from out doorsey shops.

    Roll of surgical sticky tape (just because it can be very useful)

    a mobile phone

    a little plastic vial of saline is useful too esp if there are ppl riding with contact lenses.

    All of the above are small items and easy to fit in the bottom of a medium sized pack.
  • Tom BartonTom Barton Posts: 516
    Oh and some insect repellant - a downed rider will be grateful of not having to put up with itching on top of his other injuries!
  • bearfraserbearfraser Posts: 435
    Gaffer Tape ????
  • tjwoodtjwood Posts: 328
    tbh in first aid kit you just really need the following.

    water from backpack, to clean wound.

    dressing.gourge i belive it called,(padded one side shiny other side) to put on cuts and wounds.

    You probably mean "gauze". Which is a wide-woven fabric used in swabs for cleaning wounds. But is not recommended for use as a dressing as the fabric can stick to the wound. The pads you describe (shiny on one side, a perforated plastic film with a padded backing) are ideal as the shiny film stops the dressing sticking to the wound. They're generically called "peforated film absorbent" (PFA) dressings but one of the most common brand names of these is Melolin and you can buy them in most large supermarkets, chemists etc.
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