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Junior gear restrictions

Ashley1993Ashley1993 Posts: 13
edited January 2011 in Amateur race
What are the gear restrictions for juniors when road racing?
i heard that you can still use a 53 ring if you limit the rear gears, is this true? if so what is the ratio, all advice is appreciated.

Thanks, Ashley
Ride hard, then get some rest, and go out and do it all again!

Posts

  • 52 14 is the ratio and im 16 ive never had any trouble with it at Scrutineering
    Arran
    Carpe Diem
  • Ashley1993Ashley1993 Posts: 13
    Cheers pal
    Ride hard, then get some rest, and go out and do it all again!
  • ProssPross Posts: 26,986
    The restriction is 7.93m so if you are riding with a 53 tooth chainring at the moment a 14 at the rear will still be fine (it actually gives 7.95m with a 23mm tyre but I'm pretty sure 2cm won't show up on a check). You can either block off the smaller sprockets at the rear or buy a 14 up cassette.
  • BronzieBronzie Posts: 4,927
    Pross wrote:
    The restriction is 7.93m
    That's correct for Juniors [ie 16-18].
    But note that it's less for Youths (under 16) and depends on which age category they fall into.
  • Ashley1993Ashley1993 Posts: 13
    thanks very much for your help guys really appreciate it! :)
    Ride hard, then get some rest, and go out and do it all again!
  • ProssPross Posts: 26,986
    Bronzie wrote:
    Pross wrote:
    The restriction is 7.93m
    That's correct for Juniors [ie 16-18].
    But note that it's less for Youths (under 16) and depends on which age category they fall into.

    Yep, but the OP was specifically about juniors and from their username I'd guess they are 16 or 17 :wink: I did almost put the youth restrictions too but didn't want to confuse things.
  • SlimbodsSlimbods Posts: 321
    I've just been using the limit screws for my kids (age 11 and 13), but I notice some kids have bikes where they're changing the chainrings. Is there much of a difference?
  • ProssPross Posts: 26,986
    I used the screws for a while as a junior back in the old days of 6 speed cassettes before finally getting a 15 up cassette as was required then so now with 10 speed cassettes it shouldn't cause a problem.
  • BronzieBronzie Posts: 4,927
    Pross wrote:
    Yep, but the OP was specifically about juniors and from their username I'd guess they are 16 or 17 :wink: I did almost put the youth restrictions too but didn't want to confuse things.
    Was just clarifying (or confusing the issue?) that people tend to refer to anyone under 18 as a "Junior" which is obviously not the case.

    Anyhow, good spot on the username :)
  • lyn1lyn1 Posts: 261
    Slimbods wrote:
    I've just been using the limit screws for my kids (age 11 and 13), but I notice some kids have bikes where they're changing the chainrings. Is there much of a difference?

    It depends how seriously you are taking it.

    Its not just a matter of getting within the roll out limit, but getting as close to the line as possible. Different permutations of chain ring and casette size will be legal, but if you are well short, the rider is loosing distance every pedal revolution when in the top gear against competitors who have optimised their combination. There are gear tables that you can use to work it out.

    As an aside, while screwing off the mech is ok here it is frowned upon in some Euro countries if racing there. They may also have different role out limits for different age cats to UK so beware.
  • SlimbodsSlimbods Posts: 321
    Thanks for the replies.

    They're just doing 3 and 10 mile crits at the moment, and the odd 10 mile TT. Biggest problem with using the limiters is they're stuck on the small ring up front which is compact and they get chain rub when they use the lower gears on the rear cassette.
  • Hi

    From my days as a schoolboy/junior racer they did get stroppy over blocked off gears - which was brillaint as i didnt have the money to get the new chainrings or cassette required and missed a load of races. but im over it now

    One option with cassettes is to mix and match 2 cassettes then angle grind the teeth off the bottom sprockets so its unusable - that was allowed, and you should still be able to use cassette removers to get teh cassette off
  • Hi

    I've just found this post. Does anyone know a source of junior cassettes with large cogs, say 15-23 ish, to allow for youth riders gear restriction?

    Currently running a single small chainring with wide ratio cassette but would like a more grown-up double chainset combo now.

    Exact tooth numbers are not important, I can work out the gearing, firstly I need to know where I can buy cassettes in the UK.

    Many thanks

    Ala
  • ProssPross Posts: 26,986
    Wiggle have Shimano Ultegra cassettes available in 15 - 25 (10 speed). 15 up cassettes used to be fairly standard.

    However, for youth racing the 15 might not be the best option with a standard chainset. Have a look here first and check that splashing out £50 on a cassette will give you the gearing you need http://new.britishcycling.org.uk/zuvvi/media/bc_files/corporate/06-Rulebook-2010-GENERAL_ROAD_TRACK.pdf (pages 3 and 37).
  • MikeWWMikeWW Posts: 723
    Try Parker International-normally have a good choice including BBB
  • hammeritehammerite Posts: 3,408
    I should probably ask this question on the Road Buying Advice forum, but as this is related to this thread so I'll ask here too.

    Jnr has an Isla bike, comes with a 38 chainring, and 8 speed cassette (11-34, fine for CX). Using Sheldon Brown's calculator I've worked out for his age group that 38x15 is the biggest gear allowed (5.4m). Any idea where I can get 8 speed cassette with 15 as the smallest sprocket?
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