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straight over the handle bars steep hill

2wheelsonit2wheelsonit Posts: 72
edited June 2010 in MTB general
On my old bike i went down a steep dusty hill and about half way down went censored over t*t, now i have the new bike (rockrider 5.3) so do i go for it again initially i was hanging off the bike with my dangleys at the back of the seat prehaps i was a little heavy on the front brake as theres a bump on the way down, has anyone else become a cropper and gone for it again, as it happens i dusted myself down and was just a little achey next day :lol:

Posts

  • Stay off the front break...
  • VWsurfbumVWsurfbum Posts: 7,881
    if you dont get back on it straight away you never will!
    Kazza the Tranny
    Now for sale Fatty
  • 2wheelsonit2wheelsonit Posts: 72
    I see where your coming from but.. theres a point do when u say mmm bit too steep that one ill ride on
  • VWsurfbumVWsurfbum Posts: 7,881
    LOL never! :lol:
    Kazza the Tranny
    Now for sale Fatty
  • JamesBrckmnJamesBrckmn Posts: 1,360
    put the saddle down, get your weight over the rear wheel, and use the back brake more
  • robertpbrobertpb Posts: 1,866
    Stay off the front break...

    Going to be a bit hard to slow down without using the main brake.

    2wheelsonit

    Keep doing it until you don't fall off is my motto, I'm always going over the bars and I'm just coming up to 60. :lol:

    Don't bounce quite as well as when I was in my early 30's but I've learned more crashing skills. 8)
    Now where's that "Get Out of Crash Free Card"
  • AtzAtz Posts: 1,383
    To be honest, if you don't want to ride it, don't. Being scared and grabbing too much brake or going too slowly because you're bricking it is a bad way to go. All of my falls last weekend were very low speed because I was too cautious.
  • RaymondavalonRaymondavalon Posts: 5,346
    Stay off the front break...
    +1
    And the front brake too...
  • Oxygen ThiefOxygen Thief Posts: 649
    Flat out down it, no braking if possible, if not use the back one a bit.
  • bike-a-swanbike-a-swan Posts: 1,235
    If it comes to it I find you can shed a surprising amount of speed on a steep slope by locking up the back wheel and fishtailing it side to side. Not my preferred method, it can make a mess of the surface, but it can help if the run is too long to safely roll out free.
    Rock Lobster 853, Trek 1200 and a very old, tired and loved Apollo Javelin.
  • peter413peter413 Posts: 5,120
    If it comes to it I find you can shed a surprising amount of speed on a steep slope by locking up the back wheel and fishtailing it side to side. Not my preferred method, it can make a mess of the surface, but it can help if the run is too long to safely roll out free.

    This works wonders on loose rocky trails or really dusty trails (like inches thick :lol: )
  • 2wheelsonit2wheelsonit Posts: 72
    K, i think i'll go for it again, the trouble was guys that the brakes on my old bike were poo and at the bottom of the hill a few metres away is a canal. its funny i was always on my bike years ago guess u get a bit rusty. Maybe i can get my son to film it and u can see how i get on (or Off) :P
  • Oxygen ThiefOxygen Thief Posts: 649
    That's the spirit.
  • sophsophsophsoph Posts: 24
    Stay off the front break...

    I swaer i'm just going to remove my front break. no good can come of it no sireee

    When i was younger i managed to flip right over the front of my bike and break my arm in two places, plus gouge out a cunk of my hip on road gravel. bad times :(
  • ceecee Posts: 4,553
    I once rode the red route at glentress with only a front brake.

    Turns out, I discovered I had been draggin the back brakeg too much.

    It was great fun.

    front brake for braking, back brake for steering/stability
    Whenever I see an adult on a bicycle, I believe in the future of the human race.

    H.G. Wells.
  • Andy BAndy B Posts: 8,115
    cee wrote:
    front brake for braking, back brake for steering
    This ^

    You get loads more power from a front brake than the rear, you just need to learn to control your braking better to get the full potential out of the front brake.
    2385861000_d125abe796_m.jpg
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    Andy B wrote:
    cee wrote:
    front brake for braking, back brake for steering
    This ^

    You get loads more power from a front brake than the rear, you just need to learn to control your braking better to get the full potential out of the front brake.
    indeed. Back brake is virtually useless for any decelerative purposes, in any mountain bike based situation.
  • BriggoBriggo Posts: 3,537
    Just learn to feather your front brake more, dont just jam it on or you'll produce too much stopping force and the weight of you + gear will be carried forward over your handlebars, and either slide your bum back on the seat or completely off the back of it if its really steep.
  • mancjonmancjon Posts: 53
    One other thing to remember is to make sure your heels are pointing down on the pedals so that if you do need to brake the force goes through your feet and your body is braced against your feet. If your feet are level or toes pointing slightly down the force is then transferred more to your hands and your weight is shifted forward.
  • stumpyjonstumpyjon Posts: 4,069
    It's got to be really, really steep to need to hang off the back. It's all to do with control, being loose and body positioning. Most people go over the bars because they are rigid, arms locked, legs locked, hanging onto the saddle with their thighs. If / when you hit a bump you shoot forward and over the bars you go. If you are nice and loose then when you hit something you can absorb the shock and redistribute your weight. It's very counter intuitive but once you can get over the fear of being central on your bike, you'll find you have much more control over the bike which in turn means you're looser which in turn breeds confidence. Took a bit of coaching before I got it and then started to find I could comfortably ride stuff that before I'd have bottled or only just got over.
    It's easier to ask for forgiveness than for permission.

    I've bought a new bike....ouch - result
    Can I buy a new bike?...No - no result
  • Ok so i went for it and whoo hoooo managed it what a buzz keep your drink and drugs, i did a walk down of this hill to pick the best line and found that if i even touched the front brake the bike flipped. SO i just snaked the back and naturally found myself hanging off the back then i went straight back up and did it again just to make sure it wasn't a fluke. Think now i'll try and ease of the rear a little and build more speed

    I got my nephew to film on my phone but the sun was behind and the zoom was pathetic so im going to film it on a proper corder

    Thanks for the tips :lol:
  • Ok so i went for it and whoo hoooo managed it what a buzz keep your drink and drugs, i did a walk down of this hill to pick the best line and found that if i even touched the front brake the bike flipped. SO i just snaked the back and naturally found myself hanging off the back then i went straight back up and did it again just to make sure it wasn't a fluke. Think now i'll try and ease of the rear a little and build more speed

    I got my nephew to film on my phone but the sun was behind and the zoom was pathetic so im going to film it on a proper corder

    Thanks for the tips :lol:
  • Oxygen ThiefOxygen Thief Posts: 649
    mancjon wrote:
    One other thing to remember is to make sure your heels are pointing down on the pedals so that if you do need to brake the force goes through your feet and your body is braced against your feet. If your feet are level or toes pointing slightly down the force is then transferred more to your hands and your weight is shifted forward.

    I think that's a really good tip.
  • Did this today on a very dust rocky section of marin trail, my front wheel got pitched into the air, the break stopped it, and on landing I was flipped right over landing on my hip.

    The result, I've started to switch my braking to the back just before any very bouncy sections and switch back as it smoothes out.
  • chedabobchedabob Posts: 1,133
    I was riding along the other day and a beast of a drop came out of nowhere:

    ZYSeU.jpg

    Skidded over the edge, didn't have chance to release the front brake and went straight over the bars. Landed about 1/3rd of the way down with the bike on top of me. Managed to bend the brake levers, knocked the lockout lever off my forks and ripped one of the cable ties off the rear brake cable. Pretty badly cut up as well :( Apparently it can be ridden, but I'm not giving it another go until I've got someone else with me, because it could end up a lot worse than a few cuts. Shame, because right after that there's a really really awesome downhill section, and there's a nice bit of singletrack before it.
  • xCatch22xxCatch22x Posts: 36
    About 10 years ago I have a moment at Wharncliffe Woods on the orange stream that resulted in a broken wrist and 3 months off work. Nice weather though for 3 months holiday, sorry, illness.

    Anyway, it happened right at the bottom just as I decided to grap a bit more of front brake. The reason it happened was due to the front lever position being too far from the bars. Since then I always have the lever closer to the bar so as not to give too much brake while holding on for dear life. Helps me loads and does not hinder the braking athough my braking has to be very delibrate to get a good amount force to the disc.

    I also agree that the front brake is a good tool for even the steepest of hills. It all boils down to working out what will make the front lock or slip and then having the control to back it off a little without panicking.

    Wayne.
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