Tubby time - Bora One vs 404 vs??

guinea
guinea Posts: 1,177
edited April 2010 in Road buying advice
After getting a powertap for my last birthday, the lovely missus has decided I need a faster set of wheels.

I have a set of Shamals which are used for everything. I'd like something more aero. I go abroad a few times a year and do a fair bit of climbing as well as all day rides wherever I fancy. I weigh aroung 85kgs.

I'd like a decent wearing, relatively light aero wheelset with a campag fitting. I think I'd like to try tubs, and don't mind full carbon even though I'd have to swap brake pads.

My current top two under consideration are the new Bora One or the Zipp 404s. I don't want anything heavier than my Ultras and would like a 50mm+ rim.

Any preferences, tips or advice would be great. The budget is up to £1500 but I don't have to spend it all :)

Comments

  • incog24
    incog24 Posts: 549
    That's a pretty tasty present!

    I'd be tempted to go for the Bora's, probably not for any performance benefit, they just look immense!

    Other options, Corima Aero +, or Wheelsmith Gigantex Ultralight 50mms?

    Possibly go with the Gigantex for just under 1k, then get some really nice tubs for £80 each(ish), nice skewers and good wheel bags.
    Racing for Fluid Fin Race Team in 2012 - www.fluidfin.co.uk
  • Monty Dog
    Monty Dog Posts: 20,614
    Boras every time for me - the quality and durability factor win every time. As Kleber indicated on your other posts, alternatives include Fulcrums, Edge or Corimas (Cormina make the rims for Campagnolo/Fulcrum).

    Most people I know who race on Zipps - road racing, not sportives, TTs or tris which don't hammer wheels as much - have experienced problems with breakages, flexy wheels and general poor reliability.

    In terms of tubs, again Vittoria EVO CXs or Veloflex carbons. I'm running a pair of EVOs on my race wheels since 2008 with no punctures on some fairly rough and ready road race courses where you have little choice to avoid gravel and potholes.
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • incog24
    incog24 Posts: 549
    Who makes the Fulcrum carbon rims? Fulcrum is campag right? So are they just bora rims built up differently? Or are they a different rim built again by corima?
    Racing for Fluid Fin Race Team in 2012 - www.fluidfin.co.uk
  • wildmoustache
    wildmoustache Posts: 4,010
    well ... think about:

    > Intended use
    > Robustness
    > Aerodynamics
    > Hubs
    > Weight (and weight distribution)
    > Stiffness
    > Price
    > Resale
    > Aesthetics (including how they work with your bikes)

    In whatever order suits your priorities.

    Doubt you'll go wrong with either. Zipps a bit more aero and better for TTs. Bora likely to be tougher and hold value better, and are cheaper.

    Honestly I think this one comes down to whatever you like the look of.
  • guinea
    guinea Posts: 1,177
    There's not a lot of info about the Bora One wheels online. Anyone ridden a set? Are they in any way comparable to Ultra Twos? They don't have the cult bearings and are a little heavier, is that the only difference?

    The Zipp colour scheme would fit the bike better, but I'm not that shallow, honest :P
  • Monty Dog
    Monty Dog Posts: 20,614
    The only difference between Boras and Fulcrum Carbons is the spoking pattern and stickers - in most other details they're near identical. I've ridden Boras and they are very stiff and feel very fast - I know someone who ditched a pair of Lightweights for Boras because the LWs were unreliable.
    FWIW Corima supplies the rims, Campagnolo build their own wheels.
    Many of the Zipps are imported in kit form and built locally and consequently build-quality has been variable, particularly when they changed distributors. In this respect, the wheels that the ProTeams used are not built by the same folks who buld your shop-bought ones whereas your Campagnolo/Fulcrum ones all come from the same source.
    If you want more opinions, go over to Weightweenies where they're a bit more knowledgeable in such matters.
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • wildmoustache
    wildmoustache Posts: 4,010
    guinea wrote:
    There's not a lot of info about the Bora One wheels online. Anyone ridden a set? Are they in any way comparable to Ultra Twos? They don't have the cult bearings and are a little heavier, is that the only difference?

    The Zipp colour scheme would fit the bike better, but I'm not that shallow, honest :P

    Yes, I have a set. They are awesome. The rim is identical to the Ultra Twos. The additional weight is due to some minor hub differences (e.g. alu shell not carbon). Cult bearings ... nice but Campagnolo steel bearings rip the nuts off most things out there.

    In all honesty they would be something like 99.9% of the wheel the Ultra Twos are.

    Note that the Boras have lighter rims than the Zipps ... and much lighter if you rip of the decals (not recommeded for re-sale purposes). So ignore Zipps being marginallly lighter.
  • APIII
    APIII Posts: 2,010
    Monty Dog wrote:
    I know someone who ditched a pair of Lightweights for Boras because the LWs were unreliable.

    Interesting. In what way were they unreliable? Apart from breaking a spoke I didn't think there was much to go wrong.
  • Pokerface
    Pokerface Posts: 7,960
    Monty Dog wrote:
    In terms of tubs, again Vittoria EVO CXs or Veloflex carbons. I'm running a pair of EVOs on my race wheels since 2008 with no punctures on some fairly rough and ready road race courses where you have little choice to avoid gravel and potholes.


    I like Vittoria's. I have them on all my good wheels. But damn it if I haven't have TWO flats in 5 rides on them since I went to tubs! Flat circuit races too.


    Go figure.
  • Monty Dog
    Monty Dog Posts: 20,614
    APIII wrote:
    Monty Dog wrote:
    I know someone who ditched a pair of Lightweights for Boras because the LWs were unreliable.

    Interesting. In what way were they unreliable? Apart from breaking a spoke I didn't think there was much to go wrong.

    They went out of true twice - after the second time back to the factory because they can't be serviced conventionally, he negotiated a refund and bought the Boras.
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • guinea
    guinea Posts: 1,177
    Thanks guys.

    I'm almost definitely going for the Bora Ones.

    A question about fitting - glue or tape? Should I add sealant or take a spare and/or sealant?
  • wildmoustache
    wildmoustache Posts: 4,010
    guinea wrote:
    Thanks guys.

    I'm almost definitely going for the Bora Ones.

    A question about fitting - glue or tape? Should I add sealant or take a spare and/or sealant?

    Personally, glue. Though there are arguments both ways. Tape is cleaner. Glue, if done properly is technically slightly superior in terms of rolling resistance.

    Sealant - not for me. Impairs performance. Fine to fix a puncture. BUT it all depends on your puncture frequency and tolerance.
  • STEFANOS4784
    STEFANOS4784 Posts: 4,109
    Extralite Ultraclimb

    Time for Tubby bye-byes.


    Sorry, couldn't resist :wink:
  • wildmoustache
    wildmoustache Posts: 4,010
    Extralite Ultraclimb

    Time for Tubby bye-byes.


    Sorry, couldn't resist :wink:

    Very light ... and I'd be confident of having them in bits within a few rides ... so I'll pass :wink:
  • guinea
    guinea Posts: 1,177
    I move fast. The tubs are on and the wheels look lovely. Well they would it they weren't covered in glue.

    How do you get the glue off? I got some off with wd40/soap, but is there anything easier, perhaps a thinner that can be used on carbon??

    I also can't slip off the old brake pads. I think I'm just going to buy new holders than continue to try to swap. The instructions make it look so easy, but the old ones just don't budge.
  • andyp
    andyp Posts: 10,294
    Acetone (nail varnish remover) is good for removing glue.

    Definitely swap out the brake pad holders, it makes life much easier.