Amazing empty skies this weekend...

ScottieP
ScottieP Posts: 599
edited April 2010 in The bottom bracket
With the great weather this weekend - not a cloud all weekend and the ash from Iceland, we've had two days of no commercial flights over where I live ... and the difference was amazing. We live near-ish to Gatwick and there are always planes or vapour trails somewhere in the sky.

I kept looking up most of the weekend - and thought it was a bizarre treat to see an empty sky all day each day.

Of course it would have been driving me nuts if I was trying to get somewhere, but as I wasn't I thought it was tremendous.
My cycling blog: http://girodilento.com/
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Comments

  • mrushton
    mrushton Posts: 5,182
    Unless that certain part that you needed for your bike was stuck in cargo en route from eg Frankfurt or Milan
    M.Rushton
  • Percy Vera
    Percy Vera Posts: 1,103
    or you start getting hungry and the shops are empty....
  • ScottieP
    ScottieP Posts: 599
    Sorry the glass is half empty rather than half full for you guys. I thought it was amazing, but know we'll be back to normal soon enough, so I'm enjoying the moment. It's like a solar eclipse not something you see everyday.
    My cycling blog: http://girodilento.com/
  • I'm with ScottieP on this.
    If our society can't cope with a couple of days/weeks without airplanes then its broken.
  • I live under one of the Stansted stacks and although you can't hear them, we have noticed the absence of large planes. We still get light aircraft from Stapleford flying over, but the lack of jets is great.
  • joshtp
    joshtp Posts: 3,966
    your right.. iv never seen such totaly clear sky's before...its awsome!
    I like bikes and stuff
  • mrushton
    mrushton Posts: 5,182
    I'm with ScottieP on this.
    If our society can't cope with a couple of days/weeks without airplanes then its broken.

    No, it's just the society we've created. If you live in eg the Outer Hebrides that lifestyle will be different to one in Surrey. We live in a Western society that accepts/demands things happen now and air travel/freight speeds this demand. I'm sure someone on here will give a better explanation. No doubt you get frustrated when your computer loads slowly or crashes but there was a time when email/bike forums didn't exist. Can you manage without your computer for a week or two?
    M.Rushton
  • Interesting article written by Libby Purves in The Times today about this very topic.
  • mroli
    mroli Posts: 3,622
    I agree, it has been bloody lovely. I rode down the A4 past Heathrow on Sun and the roads were deserted, my missus drove on the M4 and there was little/no traffic. We're on the flightpath and the quiet has been delightful.

    As for food/services etc etc - food is 2% by air and I can live without Kiwi fruits or loganberries flown in from Africa. Parts etc - well, very little bike parts are by air, so that's not a problem.

    I have had mates stuck abroad and they've had real adventures getting back (some have just stayed out there).

    I realise for many it is a real inconvenience and for some it is even worse than that, but for me, it has been thoroughly enjoyable...
  • Porgy
    Porgy Posts: 4,525
    My wife will be happy - she lives - and we used to live - right under the flightpath. she's always get awakened at around 4.30/ 5.00 am by the planes though I can sleep through almost anything.

    Scientists will like it too - the last time they got to study an atmosphere free of planes was in September 2001 - though i guess the presence of volcanic ash might not be ideal.

    I'm pleased to have a bit more peace and quiet - but tbh it's made little difference to me this time, not much in the way of aircraft fly over Welling, except the bleeding police helicopter..
  • rick_chasey
    rick_chasey Posts: 74,497
    It's not a glass half full scenario, because there's plenty more shit than good stuff.

    Peace of quiet comes at the cost of potentially jobs, inflation (if it continues), disruption, general costs to other companies, individual stress.

    It's all a bloody big nightmare. I have a friend who's mother just died abroad, and he can't get there for the funeral.


    But oh well, at least we have a little peace and quiet. :roll:
  • ColinJ
    ColinJ Posts: 2,218
    mrushton wrote:
    No, it's just the society we've created. If you live in eg the Outer Hebrides that lifestyle will be different to one in Surrey. We live in a Western society that accepts/demands things happen now and air travel/freight speeds this demand. I'm sure someone on here will give a better explanation. No doubt you get frustrated when your computer loads slowly or crashes but there was a time when email/bike forums didn't exist. Can you manage without your computer for a week or two?
    I was talking about this kind of thing on a ride yesterday.

    When I was a teenager my main hobby was electronics. I got into listening to music and wanted a hifi but couldn't afford a decent amp so I decided to build one. The process went something like this:
      Choose design from my collection of electronics magazines Save my pocket money to pay for components Write letters to companies requesting catalogues Wait to receive catalogues Scan catalogues for cheapest components Fill in paper order forms and get my mum to write cheques for me Post orders Over the next couple of weeks the various parts would arrive Assemble amp modules Test modules Fix any problems Buy sheet metal and saw, file and drill it to make panels for case Assemble case Insert modules Wire up modules Final tests I can listen to music on a decent system!
    Now, it would be...
      Visit a few relevant websites Tell mum that I want an iPod from website #3 Mum uses her credit card to order iPod on overnight delivery Next day - I can listen to music on my new iPod!
  • rick_chasey
    rick_chasey Posts: 74,497
    ColinJ wrote:
    mrushton wrote:
    No, it's just the society we've created. If you live in eg the Outer Hebrides that lifestyle will be different to one in Surrey. We live in a Western society that accepts/demands things happen now and air travel/freight speeds this demand. I'm sure someone on here will give a better explanation. No doubt you get frustrated when your computer loads slowly or crashes but there was a time when email/bike forums didn't exist. Can you manage without your computer for a week or two?
    I was talking about this kind of thing on a ride yesterday.

    When I was a teenager my main hobby was electronics. I got into listening to music and wanted a hifi but couldn't afford a decent amp so I decided to build one. The process went something like this:
      Choose design from my collection of electronics magazines Save my pocket money to pay for components Write letters to companies requesting catalogues Wait to receive catalogues Scan catalogues for cheapest components Fill in paper order forms and get my mum to write cheques for me Post orders Over the next couple of weeks the various parts would arrive Assemble amp modules Test modules Fix any problems Buy sheet metal and saw, file and drill it to make panels for case Assemble case Insert modules Wire up modules Final tests I can listen to music on a decent system!
    Now, it would be...
      Visit a few relevant websites Tell mum that I want an iPod from website #3 Mum uses her credit card to order iPod on overnight delivery Next day - I can listen to music on my new iPod!

    How would you know what's like to be a teenager now?
  • Porgy
    Porgy Posts: 4,525
    edited April 2010
    It's not a glass half full scenario, because there's plenty more shoot than good stuff.

    Peace of quiet comes at the cost of potentially jobs, inflation (if it continues), disruption, general costs to other companies, individual stress.

    It's all a bloody big nightmare. I have a friend who's mother just died abroad, and he can't get there for the funeral.


    But oh well, at least we have a little peace and quiet. :roll:

    So you get stressed out on other people's behalf? You really need to chill out about things that a) don;t directly affect you and b) you can't change; and stop worrying - you know it'll all be OK in the end...and you'll be happier, and you'll probably live longer.

    Nightmare!! :lol:
  • rick_chasey
    rick_chasey Posts: 74,497
    Porgy wrote:
    It's not a glass half full scenario, because there's plenty more shoot than good stuff.

    Peace of quiet comes at the cost of potentially jobs, inflation (if it continues), disruption, general costs to other companies, individual stress.

    It's all a bloody big nightmare. I have a friend who's mother just died abroad, and he can't get there for the funeral.


    But oh well, at least we have a little peace and quiet. :roll:

    So you get stressed out on other people's behalf? You really need to chill out and stop worrying - you know it'll all be OK in the end...and you'll be happier, and you'll probably live longer.

    Nightmare!! :lol:

    I care for my friend who can't go to his own mother's funeral.

    Glad you're not my friend!
  • finchy
    finchy Posts: 6,686
    It's all a bloody big nightmare. I have a friend who's mother just died abroad, and he can't get there for the funeral.

    Where? Is it not close enough to go by boat/coach/train?
  • Porgy
    Porgy Posts: 4,525
    Porgy wrote:
    It's not a glass half full scenario, because there's plenty more shoot than good stuff.

    Peace of quiet comes at the cost of potentially jobs, inflation (if it continues), disruption, general costs to other companies, individual stress.

    It's all a bloody big nightmare. I have a friend who's mother just died abroad, and he can't get there for the funeral.


    But oh well, at least we have a little peace and quiet. :roll:

    So you get stressed out on other people's behalf? You really need to chill out and stop worrying - you know it'll all be OK in the end...and you'll be happier, and you'll probably live longer.

    Nightmare!! :lol:

    I care for my friend who can't go to his own mother's funeral.

    Glad you're not my friend!

    So am I Mr stress!! :lol:
  • rick_chasey
    rick_chasey Posts: 74,497
    johnfinch wrote:
    It's all a bloody big nightmare. I have a friend who's mother just died abroad, and he can't get there for the funeral.

    Where? Is it not close enough to go by boat/coach/train?

    Vietnam...

    (He's French...ish)
  • finchy
    finchy Posts: 6,686
    johnfinch wrote:
    It's all a bloody big nightmare. I have a friend who's mother just died abroad, and he can't get there for the funeral.

    Where? Is it not close enough to go by boat/coach/train?

    Vietnam...

    Guess that answers my question then. :(
  • Porgy
    Porgy Posts: 4,525
    edited April 2010
    ColinJ wrote:
    mrushton wrote:
    No, it's just the society we've created. If you live in eg the Outer Hebrides that lifestyle will be different to one in Surrey. We live in a Western society that accepts/demands things happen now and air travel/freight speeds this demand. I'm sure someone on here will give a better explanation. No doubt you get frustrated when your computer loads slowly or crashes but there was a time when email/bike forums didn't exist. Can you manage without your computer for a week or two?
    I was talking about this kind of thing on a ride yesterday.

    When I was a teenager my main hobby was electronics. I got into listening to music and wanted a hifi but couldn't afford a decent amp so I decided to build one. The process went something like this:
      Choose design from my collection of electronics magazines Save my pocket money to pay for components Write letters to companies requesting catalogues Wait to receive catalogues Scan catalogues for cheapest components Fill in paper order forms and get my mum to write cheques for me Post orders Over the next couple of weeks the various parts would arrive Assemble amp modules Test modules Fix any problems Buy sheet metal and saw, file and drill it to make panels for case Assemble case Insert modules Wire up modules Final tests I can listen to music on a decent system!
    Now, it would be...
      Visit a few relevant websites Tell mum that I want an iPod from website #3 Mum uses her credit card to order iPod on overnight delivery Next day - I can listen to music on my new iPod!

    How would you know what's like to be a teenager now?

    Yeah ColinJ you're wrong. the process would be log in to Spotify; listen to music. :lol:
  • rick_chasey
    rick_chasey Posts: 74,497
    johnfinch wrote:
    johnfinch wrote:
    It's all a bloody big nightmare. I have a friend who's mother just died abroad, and he can't get there for the funeral.

    Where? Is it not close enough to go by boat/coach/train?

    Vietnam...

    Guess that answers my question then. :(

    He's halfway accross Europe on the train, trying to find an airport further east which can fly him there.

    Late is better than never.
  • Porgy
    Porgy Posts: 4,525
    anyway most people don;t need to fly to their mother's funeral abroad; and bad sh*t happens every day regardless. I'm going to enjoy the little bit of peace I have now - it'll probably never happen again.
  • ScottieP wrote:
    With the great weather this weekend - not a cloud all weekend and the ash from Iceland, we've had two days of no commercial flights over where I live ... and the difference was amazing. We live near-ish to Gatwick and there are always planes or vapour trails somewhere in the sky.

    I kept looking up most of the weekend - and thought it was a bizarre treat to see an empty sky all day each day.

    Of course it would have been driving me nuts if I was trying to get somewhere, but as I wasn't I thought it was tremendous.

    Same here! I live in the Heathrow path in London and it's been a bliss the past few days.
  • ColinJ
    ColinJ Posts: 2,218
    How would you know what's like to be a teenager now?
    I can't experience actually being one now because I'm too old but I do talk to teenagers and that's what the ones I've talked to are like. They want it, they want it all, and they want it now!

    For example:

    My nephew wanted a new phone. Company #1 could deliver it next day for £100. Company #2 could deliver it in 3 days for £70. He wasn't prepared to wait an extra 2 days even though he had a perfectly functional phone to use while waiting for delivery.

    My niece's computer had packed up and I was sorting it out for her. After 10 minutes she was asking me how long it would take. After 15 minutes she was pacing up and down. After 20 minutes she left the room because she couldn't stand the delay any longer.

    Obviously there must be some patient teenagers about somewhere but I don't meet many of them,

    And I'm not picking on teenagers. Half the adult population is getting like that now too. Try and cross a pedestrian crossing during the rush hour and see how many people try to drive straight through you even though you are already halfway across.

    A disabled man fell out of his disability scooter here and was sprawled across the road. Motorists were too impatient to stop to help him. They swerved round him and left him lying there.

    It is the way of the modern world.
  • ColinJ
    ColinJ Posts: 2,218
    Porgy wrote:
    Yeah ColinJ you're wrong. the process would be log in to Spotify; listen to music. :lol:
    Ha - I must admit, that's one thing I haven't tried yet though I do know people my age who love it.

    I think that modern technology is fantastic. Even though I went on to do a degree in electronic engineering, I gave up electronics after I graduated. I used to build things because I couldn't afford to buy them, but fantastic stuff is so cheap now - why bother?
  • rick_chasey
    rick_chasey Posts: 74,497
    An update:

    Apparantly authorities are considering allowing a temporary lift on night-time flights in and out of Heathrow to clear the backlog of passengers.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/ap ... ban-lifted

    Then again, a new cloud is threatening to ruin all chance of opening the skies again:

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/ap ... -transport
  • Le Commentateur
    Le Commentateur Posts: 4,099
    edited April 2010
    In theory it could go on for a while. The ash eruptions of the volcano on the island of Montserrat, that eventually made the northern part of the island uninhabitable, began in 1995* and the volcano there is still spewing ash 15 years later.


    (*like the Icelandic one it had been long-dormant before then).