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Ribble Bikes....Are they any good??

leechleech Posts: 77
edited January 2011 in Road buying advice
How good are Ribble Bikes? I'm thinking specifically about the Gran Fondo or the Scuro RS.

Also, any view on how they hold their value compared to say Trek, Cannondale or other big names?

Anyone got an opinion?

Posts

  • skyd0gskyd0g Posts: 2,540
    Yes
    Cycling weakly
  • ajb72ajb72 Posts: 1,178
    I own a Ribble Sportive - I bought the frame and built up the bike myself and I have also seen the Gran Fondo up close.

    The frames are made by Deda who have a decent reputation - although produced in the far east the quality of the build is first class and way beyond the price bracket. I have put about around 1000 miles into mine and have been 100% delighted in the performance, it is stiff and light, what more could you ask?

    With reference to your question about retaining value, I would guess that the large brands will retain more value because more people search for the likes of Trek or Specialized.

    However, future value is all relative - you'll pay at least 50% more for a Trek or Specialized up front - most of which is to pay for their advertising and costs associated with sponsoring pro teams. If you can live without the brand name, you'll get one hell of a lot of bike for your money.
  • PlattiPlatti Posts: 130
    I've got a Gran Fondo and can highly recommend it.
  • I don't think I have ever seen a weak review for a Ribble bike. They have been around for years and they know what they are doing.

    The range over the last couple of years has come on massively and I saw quite a few the last time I went into the shop and they are stunning looking bikes, especially the Gran Fondo, the Scuro RS and the Nero RC.

    Then when the weather turns poo again they do just about the best value winter bike too!
  • ridley2010ridley2010 Posts: 115
    Got to agree with you MichaelCycles. I was over at the warehouse shop just at the weekend after seeing the white Grand Fondo on the road the other week, and was really surprised at what they can offer.
    I was really impressed with Sportif bike and the Grand Fondo. I just can't understand how they can supply them for that price!

    Excellent value for money I say!
  • leechleech Posts: 77
    Thanks for your comments / views. It was the Gran Fondo that caught my eye when I was at their Warehouse shop recently. But I looked on the website and was wondering whether the Scuro RS would be a sensible option.

    Does anyone here have a Scuro RS that could comment on that?

    They do seem very good value, but I wondered whether there was a 'but'.
  • NWLondonerNWLondoner Posts: 2,047
    Leech wrote:
    Thanks for your comments / views. It was the Gran Fondo that caught my eye when I was at their Warehouse shop recently. But I looked on the website and was wondering whether the Scuro RS would be a sensible option.

    Does anyone here have a Scuro RS that could comment on that?

    They do seem very good value, but I wondered whether there was a 'but'.

    The ISP on the Scuro RS would be the but? :wink:
  • ajb72ajb72 Posts: 1,178
    What do you intend to use the bike for? That could determine what frame would be most suitable. The GF or Sportive have taller head tubes aimed to give a higher riding position and making them ideal for the sportive / audax / pleasure rider.

    The Scuro has a much shorter head tube and seems to be aimed more at pure racing
  • leechleech Posts: 77
    I can't imagine it would ever see a race. More sprotives and rides with friends. Possibly joining a club if I feel fit enough.

    I know what the common sense answer is....
  • never had an issue with the 2 ribble's ive owned.

    the first is a 7005 Alloy frame and has alwasy been solid as a rock, I then decided to buy one of their scandium alloy SC61.10A frames and it is light, responsive and well made.

    As was said earlier, in terms of how they hold their value, they depreciate quickly like any used bike, but as you've paid 50% less than you would have done for the same bike with a different name/decal. Therefore losing for example 33% in the first year is much more affordable on a Ribble than on a Pinarello.

    If you can get to Ribble's store then I'd go and get fitted for the bike by them, they are knowledgeable and will ensure you get the right fit for you. They will also be able to offer advise on the best bike for you.
  • zedderszedders Posts: 509
    Leech,

    See the thread in the Cakeshop forum. Some more comments about Ribble. :D
    "I spend my petrol money on Bikes, Beer, Pizza, and Donuts "

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  • prawnyprawny Posts: 5,421
    I know I'm well late to this party but the gran fondo and the scuro rs are the same geometry. only difference is the material and the ISP. I'm havind this dilemma at the moment.

    Mmm necro posting.
    Saracen Tenet 3 - 2015 - Dead - Replaced with a Hack Frame
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  • leechleech Posts: 77
    It was a while ago that I asked that question. I bought a Cube GTC Agree Race in the end. Very happy with it too.
  • ajb72 wrote:
    However, future value is all relative - you'll pay at least 50% more for a Trek or Specialized up front - most of which is to pay for their advertising and costs associated with sponsoring pro teams. If you can live without the brand name, you'll get one hell of a lot of bike for your money.

    I know this is an old thread and I'm no great fan of Trek or Specialized, but to say that the extra cost of a big brand bike is associated mainly with marketing, is to ignore the R&D that the big 'names' have invested in over the years, so that you and I can enjoy not only their own bikes, but the trickle-down to the smaller brands.

    I wish people would just be honest and say they can't afford 'x', so they are buying 'y' - instead of dressing up the reasons in some sort of inverted snobbery, or big brand bashing.

    Just thought I'd get that off my chest. :D
    I'm at that difficult age... somewhere between birth and death.
  • NWLondonerNWLondoner Posts: 2,047
    ajb72 wrote:
    However, future value is all relative - you'll pay at least 50% more for a Trek or Specialized up front - most of which is to pay for their advertising and costs associated with sponsoring pro teams. If you can live without the brand name, you'll get one hell of a lot of bike for your money.

    I know this is an old thread and I'm no great fan of Trek or Specialized, but to say that the extra cost of a big brand bike is associated mainly with marketing, is to ignore the R&D that the big 'names' have invested in over the years, so that you and I can enjoy not only their own bikes, but the trickle-down to the smaller brands.

    I wish people would just be honest and say they can't afford 'x', so they are buying 'y' - instead of dressing up the reasons in some sort of inverted snobbery, or big brand bashing.

    Just thought I'd get that off my chest. :D


    Remember the BIG Brands are also paying a lot to keep the frame exclusive to them, and considering that they upgrade the frame each and every year sometime it is better to have a proven frame rather than one that is going to last of of 5 mins.


    Ribble and PX use frames that have had a lot of up to date R&D put into them but opt not to have an exclusive deal!!!
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    Ribble make great value bikes. The planet X TT frame was being used by FdJ in the Tour just a few years back.

    What was it Lance Armstrong said ? "Its not about the Bike" I think he was right.
  • cougie wrote:
    Ribble make great value bikes. The planet X TT frame was being used by FdJ in the Tour just a few years back.

    I guess it's like Hyundai make great value cars... I just wouldn't want to drive one. I'll just stick with German cars (Hilux truck excluded) and Italian bikes thanks.
    I'm at that difficult age... somewhere between birth and death.
  • Chip \'oylerChip \'oyler Posts: 2,323
    My brother won a RR this year and went up to 2nd cat on a Scuro. He doesn't have a bad thing to say about it.
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  • twotyredtwotyred Posts: 822
    I think the phrase "brand censored " has been used around you before wheelie

    I drive a Merc because its a better car than a Hyundai. No doubt I'm paying for brand marketing but I'm also paying for the R&D, higher spec materials and a car that's built in a Mercedes factory. Believe me if a Hyundai could match a Merc ride and quality I'd be first in the queue for one.

    Most high end bike brands come out of the same factories that the cheaper frames are made in. I don't ride a big Italian bike brand because I've found their bikes are no better than other less well known and cheaper brands. I haven't ridden a Ribble but that may well be the case here.

    I reckon if Ribble stopped plastering their name on the frame and started an Italian sounding brand like Verenti they'd sell twice as many bikes.
  • twotyred wrote:

    Most high end bike brands come out of the same factories that the cheaper frames are made in.

    I was trying to get away from that old chestnut twotyred - I don't think that's the point. It's the bikes heritage, its DNA if you like... that's what I buy into. My analogy is that if a child has Italian parents, but is born in Taiwan, the kid's still Italian.

    It's too romantic (or foolish) a notion for some people, but I think sometimes these things come down to what stirs the blood, not how much something costs.

    Anyway, I guess we fundamentally disagree. Which is fine 'cos it keeps the waiting list down for new Colnago's! :wink:
    I'm at that difficult age... somewhere between birth and death.
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    It's only a bike. It has no DNA - if it's a decent bike it's a decent bike.
    Ride whatever you like.
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