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Lightweight or Aero?

NWLondonerNWLondoner Posts: 2,047
edited March 2010 in Road buying advice
It looks like i'm almost ready to click the buy button for my new set of wheels.

After much debate I.e handbuilt versus factory it looks like I have come down on the side of factory. The only rims that seem to come near are the IRD Cadence and i have read some bad things about these rims.

My current wheels are the Planet X model B (circa 1700g) which despite the lunar surface that is London's Road my wheels are still intact with no damage, hence my decision to stay with factory.


My final 2 contenders are Dura Ace 7850CL 24 or the 50mm Aero version.

Would the lightweight 24 be more benefit on the hills than the gain I would experience on the flats and rolling roads with the 50mm Aero?

The major price difference of the 50mm over the 24mm is why I am a little concerned.

Posts

  • NWLondoner wrote:
    It looks like i'm almost ready to click the buy button for my new set of wheels.

    After much debate I.e handbuilt versus factory it looks like I have come down on the side of factory. The only rims that seem to come near are the IRD Cadence and i have read some bad things about these rims

    What bad things have you read?
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  • hopper1hopper1 Posts: 4,389
    NWLondoner wrote:
    It looks like i'm almost ready to click the buy button for my new set of wheels.

    After much debate I.e handbuilt versus factory it looks like I have come down on the side of factory. The only rims that seem to come near are the IRD Cadence and i have read some bad things about these rims

    What bad things have you read?

    +1 :shock:
    Start with a budget, finish with a mortgage!
  • inseineinseine Posts: 5,785
    I've got the cl24s and they are great wheels. Lighter than the 50s and they feel very comfortable which I think the 50s wont, especially if the roads are in a poor state. They are nearly as aero too so you can't go wrong ('cept the 50s look great :wink: )
  • redddraggonredddraggon Posts: 10,862
    Aero almost always beats mass.

    Unless you are only doing steep hill climb TTs, aero wheels are better.
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  • inseineinseine Posts: 5,785
    Unless you are only doing steep hill climb TTs, aero wheels are better.

    I agree, that's the science, though light wheels do feel nice :wink: The fact is that there's not much between the two.
  • NWLondonerNWLondoner Posts: 2,047
    Aero almost always beats mass.

    Unless you are only doing steep hill climb TTs, aero wheels are better.

    Would i be correct that 30mm is not really an aero advantage over lightweight and that 50mm is better??
  • Stronger,faster riders will benefit from Aero wheels.
    Beginners or weak riders will gain more from riding lighter wheels.
    Everyone will benefit from light Aero wheels.
  • wjwswjws Posts: 140
    Not sure where you get your view from on handbuilt wheels - I have handbuilts for training etc and some factory built aeros for racing.

    Handbuilts are bomb-proof if well built - ambrosio excellight, open pro, dts and kinlins are all excellent rims and make great wheels.
  • redddraggonredddraggon Posts: 10,862
    Go for Edge, Lightweight, aero, and handbuilt.
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  • inseineinseine Posts: 5,785
    http://www.rouesartisanales.over-blog.c ... 05311.html

    Check out the differences between the Shimano C24 v C50. The C24 are surprisingly aero.
  • bristolpetebristolpete Posts: 2,255
    Hey there.

    I am lucky enough to own both sets. Have to say quite a different ride between the two as well.

    I did a review on here a couple of weeks back -

    http://www.bikeradar.com/forums/viewtop ... highlight=

    And some images here.

    http://www.bikeradar.com/forums/viewtop ... highlight=

    It is a hard one to call, but would say that the aero wheels are definately faster on the flat at the same effort.
  • NWLondoner wrote:
    Aero almost always beats mass.

    Unless you are only doing steep hill climb TTs, aero wheels are better.

    Would i be correct that 30mm is not really an aero advantage over lightweight and that 50mm is better??

    So what bad things have you read about the IRD rims?
    Expertly coached by http://www.vitessecyclecoaching.co.uk/

    http://vineristi.wordpress.com - the blog for Viner owners and lovers!
  • NWLondonerNWLondoner Posts: 2,047
    NWLondoner wrote:
    Aero almost always beats mass.

    Unless you are only doing steep hill climb TTs, aero wheels are better.

    Would i be correct that 30mm is not really an aero advantage over lightweight and that 50mm is better??

    So what bad things have you read about the IRD rims?

    I have read about issues with unstable nipple eyelets that lift and twist and longer term cracking round the eyelets.

    Also some issues with braking due to the rim construction as well.
  • Monty DogMonty Dog Posts: 20,614
    Aero benefit only really kicks in about 40kph - so if you're trundling around on a heavy pair of aero wheels it ain't really much benefit - thinking of some of the training groups I see in Richmond Park. Similarly, they only really work well in 'clean' air i.e. riding solo or on the front an not so much in the middle of a pack. Choice depends on what type of riding you're doing. I'd have lightweight and robust over heavy and aero.
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  • NWLondoner wrote:
    NWLondoner wrote:
    Aero almost always beats mass.

    Unless you are only doing steep hill climb TTs, aero wheels are better.

    Would i be correct that 30mm is not really an aero advantage over lightweight and that 50mm is better??

    So what bad things have you read about the IRD rims?

    I have read about issues with unstable nipple eyelets that lift and twist and longer term cracking round the eyelets.

    Also some issues with braking due to the rim construction as well.

    Out of interest - where did you read these points. I think I remember a recent thread on weightweenies about braking, but what about the eyelet problem?
    Expertly coached by http://www.vitessecyclecoaching.co.uk/

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  • bristolpetebristolpete Posts: 2,255
    Monty Dog wrote:
    Aero benefit only really kicks in about 40kph - so if you're trundling around on a heavy pair of aero wheels it ain't really much benefit - thinking of some of the training groups I see in Richmond Park. Similarly, they only really work well in 'clean' air i.e. riding solo or on the front an not so much in the middle of a pack. Choice depends on what type of riding you're doing. I'd have lightweight and robust over heavy and aero.

    Fair comment here. I am mainly riding at least 60 miles once a week on my own, but I do note that there are several 'club' riders running aero in the club runs.

    Perhaps, sometimes, it is simply about how it looks....?
  • NWLondonerNWLondoner Posts: 2,047
    Monty Dog wrote:
    Aero benefit only really kicks in about 40kph - so if you're trundling around on a heavy pair of aero wheels it ain't really much benefit - thinking of some of the training groups I see in Richmond Park. Similarly, they only really work well in 'clean' air i.e. riding solo or on the front an not so much in the middle of a pack. Choice depends on what type of riding you're doing. I'd have lightweight and robust over heavy and aero.


    I ride solo mostly so always have clean air and if i do ride in groups this will encourage me to hit the front LOL
  • stevenbstevenb Posts: 717
    I too am contemplating another set of wheels.
    I currently have a pair of American Classic 350 sprint wheels at 1410g a pair for £440. They have ceramic bearings and Ti skewers and rim tape included.
    They run true and straight and are very quick for climbing.

    As your mainly a solo rider I think you'de benefit from an all rounder wheel and IMO the lighter non aero rims would be your best option.

    I'm probably liek yourself in that I'd like to afford both. However, there are some shops who will let you trial a pair of wheels so it might be best to do this option, ride the same route and depending on the conditions of each time you ride you can see if your average speed improves using the aero's.

    IRD Niobium Cadence Road & VSR, Extralight SX/SR and CX-Ray black spokes are what I want and wheelsmith.co.uk sell these at £767 inc delivery and you'd be looking at a sub 1200g pair of wheels.
    I'm thinking about selling my American Classic wheels (even though I onyl bought them in Nov/Dec 2009) to help pay for them if your interested?
  • blorgblorg Posts: 1,169
    stevenb wrote:
    As your mainly a solo rider I think you'de benefit from an all rounder wheel and IMO the lighter non aero rims would be your best option.
    I would agree with this, if you are not racing get light non-aero wheels, they are fun to ride and feel nimble.
  • It's even more aero to sit on behind someone else and let them do the work - just pulled a guy on a spesh tarmac pro with Zipp 404's by the look of them around regents park for 20 miles!! 32 hole alex rims on a fixie have got to be better than deep section Zipp's?! Or is it all in the head/legs?
  • grim3urgrim3ur Posts: 46
    stevenb wrote:
    I too am contemplating another set of wheels.
    I currently have a pair of American Classic 350 sprint wheels at 1410g a pair for £440. They have ceramic bearings and Ti skewers and rim tape included.
    They run true and straight and are very quick for climbing.

    As your mainly a solo rider I think you'de benefit from an all rounder wheel and IMO the lighter non aero rims would be your best option.

    I'm probably liek yourself in that I'd like to afford both. However, there are some shops who will let you trial a pair of wheels so it might be best to do this option, ride the same route and depending on the conditions of each time you ride you can see if your average speed improves using the aero's.

    IRD Niobium Cadence Road & VSR, Extralight SX/SR and CX-Ray black spokes are what I want and wheelsmith.co.uk sell these at £767 inc delivery and you'd be looking at a sub 1200g pair of wheels.
    I'm thinking about selling my American Classic wheels (even though I onyl bought them in Nov/Dec 2009) to help pay for them if your interested?

    How are they sub 1200g?
  • stevenbstevenb Posts: 717
    They aren't.......I realised my error earlier after posting....so I'm not bothering.
    My current 350 rims are 350g and hubs 58g front 205g rear.....so the extralite hubs would only square things off at the same weight.....

    Going for American Classic Magnesiums with CX Ray spokes instead when I get back from my hols in April.
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