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Asthma

DB100DB100 Posts: 258
Hi All,
I suffered rib fractures in 2008, I have been left with pleural thickening and appear to have developed asthma. I have never had asthma before.
Can any riders with asthma give me any tips on controlling it. And how does it affect you day by day?
I am reluctant to take inhalers every day but if that's what's needed then so be it.
What are the long term effects?
Does anybody know? :?

Posts

  • more at risk if you don't take you inhalers!! there are many top sports stars that are asthmatic :D My son although only 10 and not top sports star :D is very sporty and has had asthma he manages by taking his reliever before sports. Side effects depends what you are on, the major side effect my son has, is raised heart rate and when he needs to use frequently hyperactivity :!: ( may be specific to chidren) check out internet searches on drug side effects.
  • Dr SDr S Posts: 146
    I suffer with it, its pretty controllable.

    Two puffs before you set out and it should be fine, you'll feel if your chest is tightening. If you've left your inhailler at home just breathe slowly and as deeply as you can and it will clear over time. (Vomiting over the front wheel at this point is optional)

    I don't use the brown preventer, but if you've been prescribed it, its probably worth it.

    Other tips, blue inhallers don't work well once they've been thought the washing machine, also keep it in a pocket free of fluff, when you use it and it fires pocket dust into your mouth you'll not want to do that again.

    Its really not much to worry about at all.

    Nick
    Kona Kula Supreme, the hardtail
    Scott Spark 20 the softtail
    Cannondale CAAD9 the roadie
  • woody-somwoody-som Posts: 1,001
    As someone who developed asthma in the summer of 2008, I now have the blue inhaler that I take before exercise, but then have a brown and green one that I have to take twice a day plus a tablet and I still manage to swim/cycle and run, but need to be more careful of the cold air as that sets my asthma off, so a buff the mouth at this time of year is essential for me and also wrapping up a bit warmer and no early morning club rides.

    If you have to take your blue inhaler more than 3 times a week then you are not well controlled and need a long term preventer which is usually the brown one, but if you need extra help then they add the green one and then can swap both of those for a purple combination inhaler.
  • Hi DB100,

    I am a specialist asthma consultant so can hopfully help you here!

    IF you have either/and

    Shortness of breath
    Wheeze
    Night time cough
    Phleghm

    on a frequent basis (weekly) then you asthma may be needing a preventer. It is worth though speaking to your nurse/GP and having a peak flow done. This will indicate how far you are off the normal for your age and height.

    Your reliever (blue) inhaler only lasts about 6 mins so is no use for long term management unless your only trigger is exercise. Then you can use it before/during /after etc but ONLY if this is the only time you get symptoms.

    If you are getting a wheeze/cough etc on a regular basis, treatment depends a long on your family history, severity of symptoms and your ability to use your inhaler properly. Most asthmatics think they can use their inhaler when infact they cant!

    PM me if you wish and let me know your symptoms, frequency and how you manage it at the min. We can can go from there.

    Although you shouldnt let asthma 'rule' your life, it is dangerous and needs managing properly.
    Trek Series 6
    GT Avalanche
  • evernasevernas Posts: 43
    Hi!I.m also a asthmatic and developed it many years ago.first of all you have to know what kind of asthma you've got-some has a allergic and so on,because this will help you to know what kind of medicine you have to take for.i've take a Seretide(http://medguides.medicines.org.uk/nhs/m ... use=Asthma)which prevent's asthma attack's-BUT this works for me,you should speak with you personal doctor about your treatment !!!!!in long terms-if you take right medecines and start gradually ride bike,running i etc. more and more you'll increased your lung's volume,strong heart and so on.NEVER,NEVER USE RELIEVER INHALER WHEN RIDING-USE IT BEFORE A RIDE!!IF TAKE SUCH ONE DURING RIDE COULD OVERTAX YOUR HEART!!!good luck :D
    Note; The Term "Mountain Bike" Is Incorrectly Used By Marketing People To Sell More Bikes To The General Public.
  • seatalteaseataltea Posts: 594
    NEVER,NEVER USE RELIEVER INHALER WHEN RIDING-USE IT BEFORE A RIDE!!IF TAKE SUCH ONE DURING RIDE COULD OVERTAX YOUR HEART!!!

    Rubbish, if your heart is going to go then a couple of puffs of Ventolin will make no difference at all, my opinion.

    I've had asthma and the often linked skin problems since I was a child and have been in hospital twice, mine is allergy and cold weather exercise related.

    I would be grateful if you could support your statement with some evidence,
    'nulla tenaci invia est via'
    FCN4
    Boardman HT Pro fully X0'd
    CUBE Peleton 2012
    Genesis Aether 20 all season commuter
  • How Do Boss

    I'll prefix this post by saying I am not a medical professional just someone with experience of dealing with asthma and any I don't advocate you change the frequency / dosage of your inhalers on the back of my witterings :lol:

    Firstly, don't panic it's not the end of the world I still ride despite it, management is the key and getting the right medication is key.

    I have had asthma for ages (20 years+) and have had all manner of inhalers and tablets however I've only recently found my "magic bullet" the purple preventer (oo er!). It works so well that I can't remember the last time I had to take the blue one but it must be over 1000 miles ago!

    Previously I took the brown one for years didn't really do anything if I'm honest, then I was moved to a green and brown combo which was great for the 95% of the time however when it didn't work it also meant my blue one didn't work which is exceedingly scary when you're not expecting it. That was one of the only times I have ever truly panicked wondering if i had enough breath to call an ambulance :shock: With this said the improvement over the brown one by itself was massive. After discussing this at my doctors asthma clinic I was moved to the purple one which has meant I've had no asthma attack symptoms which is brilliant.

    If you're worried or the medication you're on isn't working get on the blower to the doctors and have a word it's pointless suffering 8)
  • evernas wrote:
    NEVER,NEVER USE RELIEVER INHALER WHEN RIDING-USE IT BEFORE A RIDE!!IF TAKE SUCH ONE DURING RIDE COULD OVERTAX YOUR HEART

    Absolute b0ll0cks this is dangerous advice if you need your inhaler on a ride you take it that's what you were prescribed it for, if the dosage of your inhaler makes your heart race you should speak to the doctor about it. What is the point of being given a medicine to preserve your airway and then not taking it?

    I too would be interested to read the medical evidence to back up your claim.
  • I CAN ASSURE you there is NO evidence to suggest NOT taking your blue (short acting beta2 agonist to be exact) during a ride!!!

    What a load of twoddle!

    If you get short of breath during a ride you may just be unfit! A wheeze and that is your airways narrowing, this NEEDS treatment so use your inhaler at this point. For prevention, if anyone needs their blue inhaler when riding they may have exercised induced asthma or they may need a medication review etc to check their preventer is working properly.

    Seataltea, whoever informed you of this is wrong. Yes, salbutamol/ventolin can increase the heart rate but it is a bronchodilator and is needed on occassion to stable the airways. Even if this is during exercise, the heart cant pump oxygenated blood if it isn't there in the first place because the airways are closed!!
    Trek Series 6
    GT Avalanche
  • seatalteaseataltea Posts: 594
    I CAN ASSURE you there is NO evidence to suggest NOT taking your blue (short acting beta2 agonist to be exact) during a ride!!!

    What a load of twoddle!

    If you get short of breath during a ride you may just be unfit! A wheeze and that is your airways narrowing, this NEEDS treatment so use your inhaler at this point. For prevention, if anyone needs their blue inhaler when riding they may have exercised induced asthma or they may need a medication review etc to check their preventer is working properly.

    Seataltea, whoever informed you of this is wrong. Yes, salbutamol/ventolin can increase the heart rate but it is a bronchodilator and is needed on occassion to stable the airways. Even if this is during exercise, the heart cant pump oxygenated blood if it isn't there in the first place because the airways are closed!!

    If you are a Doc then please read my notes again, I am opposed to the advice in capitals, oh and your pens behind your ear.
    'nulla tenaci invia est via'
    FCN4
    Boardman HT Pro fully X0'd
    CUBE Peleton 2012
    Genesis Aether 20 all season commuter
  • If you are a Doc then please read my notes again, I am opposed to the advice in capitals, oh and your pens behind your ear.[/quote]

    Sorry!!!! I didn't scroll up the screen enough!! :roll: It was aimed at 'evernas' so please accept my apologies.

    And no I am not a doc but a respiratory nurse specialist. We dont keep our pens behind our ears.
    :wink:
    Trek Series 6
    GT Avalanche
  • If you are a Doc then please read my notes again, I am opposed to the advice in capitals, oh and your pens behind your ear.[/quote]

    SORRY!!

    Was aimed at 'evernas'. :roll: I didnt scroll up enough, was muttering in frustration so sorry you got the brunt of it!

    And no I am not a doc, but a respiratory nurse specialist in asthma, COPD and allergy. And we dont keep our pens behind our ears. :wink:
    Trek Series 6
    GT Avalanche
  • 13ADL1X13ADL1X Posts: 151
    I've had asthma for the last 25 years or so!
    I find that regular cycling helps as it increases my lung capacity and makes me focus on breathing properly (long, slow breathes) to pace myself.

    I carry a blue inhaler but rarely use it. The only times I really get any trouble is during cold/damp weather. But then its just a case of stopping for a bit to let my body catch up. A quick puff on the inhaler and some deep breathes then get back on and go for it.

    I would simply get on with things and not worry about it. Your body will tell you what you need. I wouldn't take my inhaler unless I'm wheezing as its pointless opening your airways when they are already open! Aso don't confuse simple exercise related shortness of breath with an asthma attack.

    I generally don't like using tablets/medicines and would rather find a natural cure. I try not to rely on my inhaler as don't feel that constant use is good in the long run. I would rather try and control my breathing to beat an asthma attack (which does work) then simply grabbing my inhaler - this also stops you relying on your inhaler to the point where you can't function without having it. If you know you can breathe through it you will be better prepared for future issues.

    When I was a kid my worst attacks happened if I knew my inhaler wasn't available. If I had an attack nad my inhaler was near the very knowledge of this would make the attack less severe. Its all psychological.
    The trail is long and my legs are burning but I can't stop smiling.
  • carbonfiendcarbonfiend Posts: 475
    I personally find that pretty reckless advice over 2000 people a year die of asthma and I'm sure that the families of these people wouldn't be too grateful to hear you say they died psychologically. The reality of astma is its an allergy that is can be inherited genetically or developed leading to an over stimulation of your immune system creating phlegm and tightening of the airways. Properly controlled asthma should on almost all occasions leave you with no or little symptons. Most people die from asthma because they dont heed the instructions when breathless thus leaving it too late to recover. I'd rather relay on drugs anyday than die thinking 'oh well at least I tried the natural way'
    '..all the bad cats in the bad hats..'
  • pdidpdid Posts: 1,065
    Hi,

    I was diagnosed with asthma at 2 years old, I turned 30 last week, having lived with asthma throughout my life I have found it to be easily controllable using the inhalers I have been prescribed.

    I have played regular football and have never had any problems with any sort of exercise. If you feel your chest tightening use your reliever and rest for a minute.

    There have been some advances in the treatment of asthma over the past few years, just after Christmas my GP recommended I try a new type of inhaler. This inhaler was described a a two in one ie it replaced blue and brown inhalers and I was to have two puffs of the new inhaler in the morning and two at night, and as and when required whilst exercising. The difference has been unbelievable and I can truly say that it is the best inhaler i`ve ever used. I now very rarely even think about my asthma, apart from when taking the inhaler.

    The new inhaler is called Symbicort, it is in a red Bricanyl type turbohaler, ask your GP about it.

    HTH

    Phil
  • Surf-MattSurf-Matt Posts: 5,952
    Whoa - quite a heated thread!

    From a non professional - my sister has always had asthma - she nearly died from it when she was 18 months old.

    She didn't really understand it and spent her teens being quite overweight. Then she was told that if she managed it, she'd be able to up the exercise.

    She dropped from a size 14-16 to an 8 and runs miles and miles every week, does spinning classes twice a week and is doing a tri soon.

    Amazing transformation from someone that was scared to exercise but fought it - she get the odd asthmatic cough but that's about it. Getting out in fresh air seemed to be a big help - in fact it was a major reason for us all moving from Surrey to Cornwall in 1989.
  • neninjaneninja Posts: 424
    evernas wrote:
    NEVER,NEVER USE RELIEVER INHALER WHEN RIDING-USE IT BEFORE A RIDE!!IF TAKE SUCH ONE DURING RIDE COULD OVERTAX YOUR HEART!!!good luck :D

    Utter ill-informed nonsense on a par with MMR causing autism. It's dangerous to spout such rubbish. The proper use of salbutamol could catch an attack before it gets worse.

    I've been asthmatic since I was a toddler - I'm now 39. I have no problems with sports as long as I take my maintenance doses of beclamethasone (the brown one) twice a day in conjunction with the ventolin (blue one).

    The only times I have a problem are if I have a cold which can provoke my asthma or flu but fortunately I get the jab for (as all asthma sufferers are entitled to).
  • DB100 wrote:
    Hi All,
    I suffered rib fractures in 2008, I have been left with pleural thickening and appear to have developed asthma. I have never had asthma before.
    Can any riders with asthma give me any tips on controlling it. And how does it affect you day by day?
    I am reluctant to take inhalers every day but if that's what's needed then so be it.
    What are the long term effects?
    Does anybody know? :?

    I've had quite severe asthma for large portions of my life- for the first 24 years or so I avoided taking medication as much as possible but I had a few incidents where I got to the lungs-cramping-up-am-i-gonna-die stage during races (rowing) which encouraged me to get proper medical care. NB- I had to try pretty hard to get to this stage, continuing to push myself really hard in a race where I was in trouble from 3 minutes into a 7 minute race.

    Since then I take montelukast tablets every evening, and take symbicort depending on how my asthma is- if I'm going through a bad patch I'll take up to 4 x 400/12 puffs a day. I occasionally use salbutamol.

    Generally if I'm racing I'll up my dose over what I have been taking for the few days prior to a race as I know my lungs are going to be taxed to their limit!

    Moderate amounts of exercise will make asthma better (4-10 hours/week) as it strengthens your lung muscles and makes you more able to cope with your symptoms (although you might feel tight when you exercise- just use your inhalers if need be!).
  • carbonfiendcarbonfiend Posts: 475
    I use symbicort and montelukast as well, I rarely ever have to use my ventolin inhaler and if I feel any sort of change in my breathing I too up my dose. I used to be regressive with my asthma and wait for symptons before acting and even to a point of being in denial about it, i then ended up in hospital and realised how close to death you can be with unmanaged asthma. I was once told by a consultant something that really brought it all home to me, you can survive without food for a few weeks, without water for a few days but without oxygen its about 2 mins and asthma hasnt got grades or levels of severity you can desend into, you can be at this stage within minutes of an 'attack'.
    I am now totally pro active with this illness and act before it has any chance of taking hold and BTW if you think you can stop the over stimulation of your immune system by deep breathing you clearly know very little of how the body works
    '..all the bad cats in the bad hats..'
  • turpinrturpinr Posts: 255
    i've been suffering with a bad chest for about 3 months and a month ago cracked 2 ribs which was not welcome.i visited my doctor on monday and following a below par flow test, now have to see an asthma nurse following a course of steroids.
    i asked my doc if you could get asthma at my age (52) he said, you can get it at 80.it was news to me.
    so whats next ??
  • carbonfiendcarbonfiend Posts: 475
    follow the advice you get given by the nurse/doctor
    '..all the bad cats in the bad hats..'
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