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New take on the lefty fork

AndyAndy Posts: 8,208
edited February 2010 in MTB general
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Personally I don't like the idea of the shock being where it is. Looks like could easily be damaged in a crash if the forks/bar spin round.

Posts

  • dunnnooodunnnooo Posts: 900
    Looks like the same design Whyte were using a few years ago.
    I'd give my right hand to be ambi-dextrous
  • Andy BAndy B Posts: 8,115
    Not too far from a Girvin fork either
    2385861000_d125abe796_m.jpg
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    lots of telelever forks in main land Europe.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • cavegiantcavegiant Posts: 1,546
    Looks awesome.

    Am I the only one who thinks you better have your stem clamped tight...

    Nothing like handlesbars falling off while doing a dh to make your day more exciting*

    P

    *helicopter rides are fun, even if to A&E
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?
  • AndyAndy Posts: 8,208
    cavegiant wrote:
    Am I the only one who thinks you better have your stem clamped tight...

    Nothing like handlesbars falling off while doing a dh to make your day more exciting*

    P

    *helicopter rides are fun, even if to A&E

    Why would it be any different to a normal fork?
  • RaymondavalonRaymondavalon Posts: 5,346
    edited February 2010
    Andy wrote:
    Why would it be any different to a normal fork?

    Perhaps it's the photo, but it does look as if the shock unit itself sits a little more inward than a traditional double crown stanchion making it prone to hitting the frame if you locked the bars during a crash
  • cavegiantcavegiant Posts: 1,546
    Andy wrote:
    cavegiant wrote:
    Am I the only one who thinks you better have your stem clamped tight...

    Nothing like handlesbars falling off while doing a dh to make your day more exciting*

    P

    *helicopter rides are fun, even if to A&E

    Why would it be any different to a normal fork?

    because the top of the can is above the headtube, therefore the full force of the compression is going into your stem. The stem is not held on very tight as not designed for that level of force.
    On a normal fork the force goes into the headtube.

    In my eyes the bit above the head tube should be connected to the bit below as in a dual crown
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?
  • cavegiantcavegiant Posts: 1,546
    Actually it looks like it might be connected through the inside of the steerer tube.

    In which case, quite clever.


    I would still thing a bar connecting in parralel with the can would not only be easier but protect the can in a crash
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?
  • ilovedirtilovedirt Posts: 5,798
    Andy_B wrote:
    Not too far from a Girvin fork either
    yeah that's what i thought, a bit more modern looking though!
    Production Privee Shan

    B'Twin Triban 5
  • arrrgghhh my eyes, just no :D
    Fuelled by cake!

    2008 Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Comp for playing in the mud.
    2013 Trek 1.2
    1982 Holdsworth Elan.
    1987 Peugeot Tour 10
  • joshtpjoshtp Posts: 4,329
    Other than some crash survivability worry's, i recon that is a great idea... its gonna be light, its gonnna be easy to change travel for dif bikes, and its gonna have awsome damping courtesy of the best rear shock in the world, oh and it should be easy to set up, service, and adjust.
    I like bikes and stuff
  • AndyAndy Posts: 8,208
    its gonna be light

    What makes you say that?
  • joshtpjoshtp Posts: 4,329
    Andy wrote:
    its gonna be light

    What makes you say that?
    well thae shock is probably lighter than all the carts in a normal fork, and the rest is just simple box sectiojn and a few pivots, no bushes, no oil, no stantions, no big reinforcemnts, and stuff to make it stiffer. i recon its a fair bit lighter than a normal one......
    i bet its super stiff too.
    I like bikes and stuff
  • OwenBirdOwenBird Posts: 210
    Made me think of these. Then I looked 'em up and realised they're nothing like. Anyway, anyone else remember the e-fohrk?
    efohrk.jpg
    SOLD!
  • XtreemXtreem Posts: 3,066
    That's just ugly in my opinion. :shock:

    But if it's that good or light, XC racers can keep it.

    OwenBird, that one's retarded. :lol:
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    German A http://www.german-a.de/german-a/kilo.html

    Parafork http://www.parafork.com/

    are the two main ones.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • bobpzerobobpzero Posts: 1,431
    whyte tried this long time back http://files.myopera.com/chernobel/albums/168996/whyte-prst-4-lrg.jpg
    does the lefty fork in the op have a price or is it prototype at the moment?
  • tri-sexualtri-sexual Posts: 672
    edited February 2010
    the cannondale lefty is very good looking,
    the idea is are few years old now but it still looks fresh and innovative, still admired by others to this day who are amazed at the design and engineering.
    the latest top end carbon lefty are beautiful

    cant say the same for this lefty design, it looks awkward and not very pleasing to the eye, definately not a design classic. it will be judged in the same manner as the whyte bikes of yesteryear (as seen in this post) as an object of amusement ( whyte bikes today are very nice indeed)

    any one got a copy of the dk complete bicycle book? there is a kona bike in there with a lefty fork, that is a very nice design ( got my copy at work), never actually seen one in the flesh but looks great the pictures.
  • billysanbillysan Posts: 575
    I really like this. I like the German:A linkage fork too. Bit like an old Lawill Leader

    Ampfork.jpg
  • Yes, my brother is still in trouble for binning the set of AMP forks he owned. The bushes didn't last too long if ridden 'proper' though.
  • jairajjairaj Posts: 3,009
    I know almost zero about suspension design. Can someone explain to me what are the advantages and disadvantages of the linkage driven front forks (if thats the correct term for them)?

    I just don't get it, whats the point and why aren't popular?
  • On reading the title I thought it was going to be a righty
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