Forum home Commuter cycling forum Commuting chat

Do cyclists need to be more courteous of other cyclists?

team south eastteam south east Posts: 19
edited January 2010 in Commuting chat
I was riding home the other night and I saw a female cyclist really struggling, she was a right wobbler so you can tell she doesn't ride on the road that often. She was in the bus lane and was approaching the bus so as she is in front and I can see ahead of me, I held back but the poor girl struggled to keep control of the bike when trying to make a hand signal to get past the parked bus. What annoyed me though is that there were 2 other cyclists behind me who just whizzed perilously past her, not caring that she was struggling and just needed a bit of courtesy and time to make her maneuver. In the end the poor girl just got on the sidewalk and waited till the traffic was clear before continuing her journey. I have noticed alot of simlar incidents like this and just wanted to know if cycle courtesy (SP?) is disappearing?

Posts

  • Clever PunClever Pun Posts: 6,778
    yup people are in a hurry to get where they're going and will put themselves first as a rule and sweeping generalisation

    the queue jumping at traffic lights by the world slowest cyclists is pretty much the same thing
    Purveyor of sonic doom

    Very Hairy Roadie - FCN 4
    Fixed Pista- FCN 5
    Beared Bromptonite - FCN 14
  • davmaggsdavmaggs Posts: 1,008
    It's just common decency to give someone who's struggling a chance. Perhaps some of the people going past weren't that confident of going further out into the traffic themselves hence they kept their line.

    As I type I also wonder if there's more of ruthless streak for many cyclists than the nice image of the activity suggests. After all many people who cycle really strive to get ahead of traffic no matter what, hence they can weave through traffic, hop over things and skip the red lights. So, when someone is struggling why would they then hold themselves up to be nice.
  • biondinobiondino Posts: 5,990
    Perhaps she shouldn't be cycling if she's too afraid or has poor bike handling. But if she IS cycling then, as you would for any vulnerable road user, you need to make sure she has the space and opportunity she needs.

    Although, as I'm sure we all know, when we're puffing along ourselves, having to stop unnecessarily can be a right pain in the horse, so as ever it's situational.
  • Clever PunClever Pun Posts: 6,778
    biondino wrote:
    Perhaps she shouldn't be cycling if she's too afraid or has poor bike handling. But if she IS cycling then, as you would for any vulnerable road user, you need to make sure she has the space and opportunity she needs.

    Although, as I'm sure we all know, when we're puffing along ourselves, having to stop unnecessarily can be a right pain in the horse, so as ever it's situational.

    got to start somewhere, her confidence and ability will only grow through miles on the bike, unless she gets wiped out by an ignorant cretin
    Purveyor of sonic doom

    Very Hairy Roadie - FCN 4
    Fixed Pista- FCN 5
    Beared Bromptonite - FCN 14
  • Yes, and this is one area where RLJing by other cyclists is a complete pain.

    I'm no inexperienced cyclist, but when going thru a green traffic light on the A-roads in central London, there's plenty to occupy my concentration. I'm usually trying to avoid: being hit by the motorist behind me running into me; being hit by the motorist behind me overtaking then turning left; being hit by the motorist alongside swerving left rather than wait 2 seconds for the car in front to turn right; being hit by the oncoming motorist swerving right rather than wait 2 seconds for the car in front to turn left; being hit by the oncoming motorist turning right; running into the pedestrian who has no concept of 'right time & place to cross'.

    I really don't appreciate it when the RLJer from the cross-traffic decides to become yet another thing claiming my attention. It's not so bad if they move slowly and wait till the junction's clear (though still wrong); but seriously, I've had times when someone has nearly collided with me doing this then got asrey when I had a go at them. :evil:

    Re the OP, the slightly scary bit about that (regardless of 1st cyclist's skill level) is the overtaking someone who's going past a bus. Fair enough if the bus is parked rather than just stopped briefly &/or the road's not all that busy, but otherwise given that the amount of space needed to overtake properly puts you well into the stream of other traffic I have to wonder if the slight extra danger is worth not just waiting a moment?
  • you cant be courteous of someone, only to them.
  • biondinobiondino Posts: 5,990
    Clever Pun wrote:
    biondino wrote:
    Perhaps she shouldn't be cycling if she's too afraid or has poor bike handling. But if she IS cycling then, as you would for any vulnerable road user, you need to make sure she has the space and opportunity she needs.

    Although, as I'm sure we all know, when we're puffing along ourselves, having to stop unnecessarily can be a right pain in the horse, so as ever it's situational.

    got to start somewhere, her confidence and ability will only grow through miles on the bike, unless she gets wiped out by an ignorant cretin

    Perhaps that somewhere should be off the road. You don't teach people to fly a plane by handing them the controls then parachuting out.
  • If she was having that much difficulty I'd have moved out into the traffic and slowed down to shelter her and give her room to manovre, much the same as I do with my other half.

    To answer to your question, yes they should and if you do need to be past then do it quickly and give them a wide berth.
  • [
    Perhaps that somewhere should be off the road. You don't teach people to fly a plane by handing them the controls then parachuting out.[/quote]

    That is exactly what they do with car drivers - get them to pass the test (which in no way teaches you to drive) and then toss them out onto the road to learn 'Want to drive at 70mph on a motorway? suits you sir'
  • biondino wrote:
    Clever Pun wrote:
    biondino wrote:
    Perhaps she shouldn't be cycling if she's too afraid or has poor bike handling. But if she IS cycling then, as you would for any vulnerable road user, you need to make sure she has the space and opportunity she needs.

    Although, as I'm sure we all know, when we're puffing along ourselves, having to stop unnecessarily can be a right pain in the horse, so as ever it's situational.

    got to start somewhere, her confidence and ability will only grow through miles on the bike, unless she gets wiped out by an ignorant cretin

    Perhaps that somewhere should be off the road. You don't teach people to fly a plane by handing them the controls then parachuting out.

    Off the road or on a quieter bunch of streets. From the OP description the road sounded pretty busy. Sure, if someone knows the basics then they should gradually take on more difficult roads. However, it sounds like mechanically she could barely even stay upright. Even without the behaviour of other cyclists, that's a dangerous lack of skill to be taking onto a busy street.
  • Ian.BIan.B Posts: 732
    I think you get courteous and discourteous cyclists just as you do courteous and discourteous lorry drivers, car drivers, scooter riders or whatever (on which subject, a scooter rider physically pushed past me when stopped at lights the other day, just to get one car further forward :evil: )
    courtesy (SP?)
    Correct. Pavement, on the other hand, is completely misspelt :lol:
Sign In or Register to comment.