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2010 Trek 8000

OberdiahOberdiah Posts: 25
edited January 2011 in Your mountain bikes
Ok, been lurking around here for a while, awesome forum so thought I’d join in and post up my ride to begin with:

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I’ve been a Trek owner for years, this is an upgrade from a Trek 4900 which I had to retire after 10 years.
The 8000 is very light and fast (never thought a bike could be fast until I tried this) and makes hill climbing easy. I think it looks the bo####ks and will keep me going for years.
I took these photos on New Years Day after cleaning down after the first ride of 2010. It was minus 3C and the bike was an ice cube when I got home.

Spec & changes/comments, if anyone’s interested, as below:

Frame: Alpha Red Aluminum w/semi-integrated head tube, butted and formed top tube, hydroformed down tube w/integrated gusset, bridgeless seatstay, forged race dropouts, replaceable derailleur hanger

Forks: RockShox Reba SL w/dual air spring, Motion Control w/remote Pop Loc, rebound, alloy steerer, 100mm

Bars: Bontrager Race Lite, flat

Stem: Bontrager X Lite 17 deg, 80mm (replaced standard spec Bontrager 7 deg, 100mm, bit too low and long for me..)

Front Brake assy: Avid Elixir 5

Rear Brake assy: Avid Elixir 5

Hoses: Standard (would like to upgrade to Goodridge braided hoses, if they’ll fit Avid systems…)

Shifters: Shimano SLX

Front Mech: Shimano SLX

Rear Mech: Shimano Deore XT Shadow

Seat: Bontrager Race (in white, or pink when dye runs out of wet shorts…)

Seat Post: Bontrager Race Lite, 31.6mm, 5mm offset (thinking of replacing with Thomson Elite Setback…)

Seat Post Clamp: Bontrager random quick release, looking to replace with a nice shiny Hope effort (original Bontrager clamp without quick release was rubbish, would not hold seatpost and I eventually stripped the thread…)

Cranks / rings: Shimano Deore XT 44/32/22

Cassette: SRAM PG970 11-34, 9 speed

Pedals: Shimano MX30 DX (superb pedals, grips like a muthaf###er and strips shins down to the bone in seconds…)

Front & Back Wheel: Bontrager SSR

Front Hub: Bontrager Select

Front & Rear Tyre: Bontrager XDX, 26x2.2"

Rear Hub: HB-M525-L

Weight: Light


Cheers all

Oberdiah

Posts

  • That's a lovely bike. I quite like the look of the Trek range for 2010, all well specced.
  • Very nice. I really like the newer Trek frames. They seem to have made Hydroforming into a bit of an art form.

    Dont think I'd be in any hurry to change anything on there tbh. If it was me, being an XC bike, I'd have SPDs on it, but that's personal choice rather than something that would make it any better.
  • Yep its a lovely bike, its just a pity that the prices shot up this year. What it costs for the 8000 you could have got the 8500 last year.

    Anyway im sure you'll get on very well with it, i have last years 8500 and love it to bits.

    I'd recommend changing the tyres tho, made a huge difference for me when i put some kenda nevegals on
  • stunning looking bike u have there :D
    CUBE ltd 2012,reba sl, XT, saint, DMR, spank, current xc/am ride

    GIANT boulder, marzzochi EXR, LX/alivio, DMR, spank, retro build
  • tdougantdougan Posts: 152
    oh that looks mean!

    I love it!
  • Cheers all, I'm lovin it :D .

    SPD's are something I thought about but had a bad experience some years back (got stuck in the clips, fell like a dead tree, minor physical damage, permanent damage to pride..)
    The tyres do need changing, I find them useless in muddy, rooty conditions so the Kenda may be the way forward.
    One thing surprised me with the Elixir brakes, went through a set or rear pads after one wet and muddy ride in Swinley Forest. Maybe I'm used to V Brakes and used the rear too much but they cost a friggin fortune! Guess I should 'man up' and brake less :oops: ...
  • Oberdiah wrote:
    One thing surprised me with the Elixir brakes, went through a set or rear pads after one wet and muddy ride in Swinley Forest. Maybe I'm used to V Brakes and used the rear too much but they cost a friggin fortune! Guess I should 'man up' and brake less :oops: ...

    Did you bed them in properly before using them? If not, they'll do that.

    Nobby nics with the silver sidewalls would look aces on that bike imho. Great tyres too, expensive though.

  • Did you bed them in properly before using them? If not, they'll do that.

    Nobby nics with the silver sidewalls would look aces on that bike imho. Great tyres too, expensive though.

    Thought I had, although now I guess I didn't. Is it just a question of heating up the disc and pad by braking hard a few times? (too used to v brakes) A friend suggested the water and mud may have had an effect as well? Roll on summer....
    Not heard of a Nobby Nic?

    Cheers
  • Oh there's no doubt that muddy conditions will wear the pads faster, but a new set of pads in 1 ride seems excessive to me. For me, bedding in always consists of braking hard from about 15mph, then letting them cool down then repeating. Some people recommend getting the discs hot enough to sizzle then pouring water on them to cool them down.

    As it's a new bike, it could even be that the brakes were not quite set up properly. Was the wear evenly spread? See how it goes, and if it keeps eating pads, I'd get it looked at.

    Allow me to introduce you to Nic.

    As I say, great tyres. Grip well, light, roll well, but certainly not cheap. Just think the silver ones would look the dogs dangly bits with that frame

    The silver ones look a bit like this:

    schwalbenobbynictriplesilver.jpg
  • DamonCDamonC Posts: 263
    Lovely bike I have the same :D

    From standard the changes I have made that make a good difference to the performance are:

    Panaracer Fire XC Pro 2.1mm (they roll a little slow, but are an awesome winter tyre IMO)
    Lock on Lizard Skin grips
    Shimano XT sealed cables (lost my rear derailleur cable to the recent wet conditions)

    I have also put the front disc on the rear and put a 203mm disc on the front as I am a big chap and found this to be a good improvement.

    I have also put some carbon fibre bars on it but this was just a vanity thing as a mate had them for sale at a good price.

    Mine as it stands today....



    P1010114-vi.jpg
    P1010115-vi.jpg
    Suffering from the light bike fat git syndrome.
  • DamonCDamonC Posts: 263
    I should add I've not got even halfway through the rear pads (and I favour them) in 6 weeks and I am a big chap.
    Suffering from the light bike fat git syndrome.
  • Oh there's no doubt that muddy conditions will wear the pads faster, but a new set of pads in 1 ride seems excessive to me. For me, bedding in always consists of braking hard from about 15mph, then letting them cool down then repeating. Some people recommend getting the discs hot enough to sizzle then pouring water on them to cool them down.

    As it's a new bike, it could even be that the brakes were not quite set up properly. Was the wear evenly spread? See how it goes, and if it keeps eating pads, I'd get it looked at.

    Allow me to introduce you to Nic.

    As I say, great tyres. Grip well, light, roll well, but certainly not cheap. Just think the silver ones would look the dogs dangly bits with that frame

    Cheers, will give that a go although I’d imagine that if I didn’t bed them in properly the first time there’s not much point after a few weeks? Wait till this set dies and do it properly next time I guess!
    Those tyres would look the DB’s, may give them a go when payday rolls around.
    DamonC wrote:
    Lovely bike I have the same :D

    From standard the changes I have made that make a good difference to the performance are:

    Panaracer Fire XC Pro 2.1mm (they roll a little slow, but are an awesome winter tyre IMO)
    Lock on Lizard Skin grips
    Shimano XT sealed cables (lost my rear derailleur cable to the recent wet conditions)

    I have also put the front disc on the rear and put a 203mm disc on the front as I am a big chap and found this to be a good improvement.

    I have also put some carbon fibre bars on it but this was just a vanity thing as a mate had them for sale at a good price.

    Nice to see another 8000 owner :D . That front disc is mahoosive, I too am a big boned chap so may look at that if it needs it. What pressures have you got your forks set at?
    DamonC wrote:
    I should add I've not got even halfway through the rear pads (and I favour them) in 6 weeks and I am a big chap.

    Hmmm, I guess the fact they weren’t properly bedded in and sh##e weather may have killed them off. Lesson learnt
    Get some sintered pads on, last ages and i cant tell hardly any difference from the organic

    Aye, been looking at sintered pads but swear I read that the standard Avid pads that come with the Elixir’s are sintered? Probably way off on that one…


    Cheers for the replies all. Hope this feckin snow stops so I can get out on it this weekend! :D
  • Just brought this bike myself after about 6 years away from riding.

    Really pleased with the handling and in particular the looks.

    A little dissapointed with the weight, although most of which seems to be coming from the wheels.

    Still happy as a pig in censored though.
  • Lovely bike.
    My Bikes And Me
    A bicycle can't stand alone; it is two tired.
  • Levi_501Levi_501 Posts: 1,105
    Lovely 8)

    Cannot wait for mine to turn up 8)
  • OberdiahOberdiah Posts: 25
    After much deliberation I decided to attempt SPD's. What a difference, I can honestly say it has transformed hill climbing. I still arrive at the top completely fcuked but fcuked efficiently.

    Anyway, as the cranks are XT I went for XT pedals to keep the 'logo flow' through the bike.

    Mrs Oberdiah is happy with the departure of the DX pedals, the pins ripped her suit jacket when I was putting it away last weekend :!:

    IMG_0807.jpg

    IMG_0808.jpg
  • Has anyone had their Trek 8000 weighed?
  • mozamimozami Posts: 25
    a bit portly at 11.5kg (w/out pedals)
    the equivalent stumpjumper comp is a whole kilo less!
    (http://www.bikeradar.com/gear/category/ ... t-09-33627)
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