Forum home Road cycling forum Road beginners

What are the benefits of going to 10spd?

AndsAnds Posts: 1,437
edited January 2010 in Road beginners
What are the benefits of going from 9spd to 10 spd? Where do I gain extra gears (do I get an extra sprocket in the middle somewhere or at top/bottom end)?

I'm thinking of changing my bike this year and had only planned to buy a frame but my OH has said I should upgrade to 10spd as well. I don't know if it's worth the extra expense.

What bits would I need to change? Is it just the shifters and cassette (already running a 10spd chain)?

Posts

  • hopper1hopper1 Posts: 4,708
    Ands wrote:
    What are the benefits of going from 9spd to 10 spd? Where do I gain extra gears (do I get an extra sprocket in the middle somewhere or at top/bottom end)?

    I'm thinking of changing my bike this year and had only planned to buy a frame but my OH has said I should upgrade to 10spd as well. I don't know if it's worth the extra expense.

    What bits would I need to change? Is it just the shifters and cassette (already running a 10spd chain)?

    It is the 31st.... Best you make your mind up, quick! :shock:
    If OH is 'allowing' you to upgrade the complete bike, go for it! Get the same model as him, just a different colour :wink:
    If you check on the various sites selling cassettes, you'll see in the description where the differences are.
    IIRC the extra gear just makes the transitions less noticeable.
    Start with a budget, finish with a mortgage!
  • redveeredvee Posts: 11,920
    Go Spinal Tap!
    I've added a signature to prove it is still possible.
  • skyd0gskyd0g Posts: 2,540
    The extra cog will (normally) be used to fill a gap in the cassette. In a standarrd Tiagra 12-25 cassette, the cogs go:
    12.13.15.17.19.21.23.25
    ...missing out most noticeably cogs 14 and 16 - meaning there are 'gaps' in the most used area of your range.

    Having a ten speed reduces these gaps, while retaining the overall range of 12-25. A standard 105 cassette runs:
    12-13-14-15-16-17-19-21-23-25T

    All of which means you can choose the most appropriate gear easier, rather than 'searching' in-between gears. Also most higher-end gruppos are 10-speed, which makes for easier upgrading compatability at a later date.

    It would probably be cheaper to buy an entire bike IMHO, rather than gruppo/frame seperately, you could then sell your current 9-speed or use it as a Winter bike. :D
    Cycling weakly
  • John C.John C. Posts: 2,113
    I would only go down the 10 speed route if:
    it's my good summer bike and your new bike has the same chain set as your old bike ie. double/triple.
    My reasons are:
    10 speed chains and cassettes are more expensive so why bother for a winter bike.
    A lot of manufacturers are not selling triples but compacts instead so you end up with a 12-27 to get the lower gear which means that your gearing is the same as a 9 speed 12-25. So if you currently run a double chain set, go for a 10 speed or if you run a triple and can get 10 speed with a triple go for it, but don't be fobbed off with a compact to replace a triple with a 10 speed.
    http://www.ripon-loiterers.org.uk/

    Fail to prepare, prepare to fail
    Hills are just a matter of pace
  • John.TJohn.T Posts: 3,698
    The main difference using Shimano 12/25 or my preferred 12/27 is the inclusion of a 16 tooth sprocket. It fills an otherwise awkward hole in the gears. This is most noticeable with a 50/34 compact.
  • AndsAnds Posts: 1,437
    hopper1 wrote:
    If OH is 'allowing' you to upgrade the complete bike, go for it! Get the same model as him, just a different colour :wink:
    OH sanctions ALL bike expenditure. Whether we can afford it is a different matter.

    As for buying the same frame as him, tsk, that is quite clearly Against The Rules. (Article 4.2.7. The value of Her bike and/or bike parts must not exceed the value of His bike and/or bike parts).

    I already run a 12-25 on a compact. The compact is new and I also love my wheels and do not want to part company with them so I don't really see the point of a whole new bike (unless I sold brand new wheels that come on a brand new bike). The rest of my groupset is mainly 105 and in really good condition so I don't 'need' to replace bits yet.

    Not sure if 2 extra gears in the mid-range can justify an additional expense of £350 to get 105 10spd + cassette. Would I need to change anything else?
  • AndsAnds Posts: 1,437
    John.T wrote:
    The main difference using Shimano 12/25 or my preferred 12/27 is the inclusion of a 16 tooth sprocket. It fills an otherwise awkward hole in the gears. This is most noticeable with a 50/34 compact.
    Now this hasn't been a noticeable problem for me but now you've mentioned it I will look out for it and no doubt it will bug me not having a 16 sprocket!! :)
  • John.TJohn.T Posts: 3,698
    I use 12/27 9sp on my winter bike and often find that 34/15 is a bit high for a climb but going to the 34/17 means I am spinning my legs off. It is not such a problem on the big ring as I am not often using such high gears. It would be on my best bikes. I also change to a 12/23 for racing to get the 18 sprocket.
    It does not matter so much if you can handle large cadence changes when some so and so is trying to drop you. Or you are prepared to let them go. :lol:
  • rakerake Posts: 3,281
    16 t are very handy. a 12-23 with 9 speed will have a 16t.
  • John C.John C. Posts: 2,113
    quite agree about the 14 and 16 t. As I have the luxury of a triple my next upgrade on my 9 speed 105 will be a 12-23 cassette.
    http://www.ripon-loiterers.org.uk/

    Fail to prepare, prepare to fail
    Hills are just a matter of pace
  • John.TJohn.T Posts: 3,698
    rake wrote:
    16 t are very handy. a 12-23 with 9 speed will have a 16t.
    Yes but no 25.
    My ideal set up would be 50/34 with 12/27 11sp. Straight through from 12 to 19 then 21,24,27.
  • rakerake Posts: 3,281
    John.T wrote:
    rake wrote:
    16 t are very handy. a 12-23 with 9 speed will have a 16t.
    Yes but no 25.
    My ideal set up would be 50/34 with 12/27 11sp. Straight through from 12 to 19 then 21,24,27.
    do they come in that range. that would be my choice. i have 10 speed but would like an 18t as well. i find a bigger jump doesnt matter so much on very steep hills .
  • hopper1hopper1 Posts: 4,708
    Ands wrote:
    hopper1 wrote:
    If OH is 'allowing' you to upgrade the complete bike, go for it! Get the same model as him, just a different colour :wink:
    OH sanctions ALL bike expenditure. Whether we can afford it is a different matter.

    As for buying the same frame as him, tsk, that is quite clearly Against The Rules. (Article 4.2.7. The value of Her bike and/or bike parts must not exceed the value of His bike and/or bike parts).

    I already run a 12-25 on a compact. The compact is new and I also love my wheels and do not want to part company with them so I don't really see the point of a whole new bike (unless I sold brand new wheels that come on a brand new bike). The rest of my groupset is mainly 105 and in really good condition so I don't 'need' to replace bits yet.

    Not sure if 2 extra gears in the mid-range can justify an additional expense of £350 to get 105 10spd + cassette. Would I need to change anything else?
    Don't exceed, silly, that's pushing your luck. Equal, or a little under (cheaper seat!).
    And, in answer to your bottom line, yes, you need to go SRAM! :shock: There's all the reasons you need... :wink:
    Start with a budget, finish with a mortgage!
  • John.TJohn.T Posts: 3,698
    rake wrote:
    John.T wrote:
    rake wrote:
    16 t are very handy. a 12-23 with 9 speed will have a 16t.
    Yes but no 25.
    My ideal set up would be 50/34 with 12/27 11sp. Straight through from 12 to 19 then 21,24,27.
    do they come in that range. that would be my choice. i have 10 speed but would like an 18t as well. i find a bigger jump doesnt matter so much on very steep hills .
    Unfortunately not. Just a 'wish list' item. In the meantime there have to be compromises.
  • prawnyprawny Posts: 5,415
    John.T wrote:
    rake wrote:
    John.T wrote:
    rake wrote:
    16 t are very handy. a 12-23 with 9 speed will have a 16t.
    Yes but no 25.
    My ideal set up would be 50/34 with 12/27 11sp. Straight through from 12 to 19 then 21,24,27.
    do they come in that range. that would be my choice. i have 10 speed but would like an 18t as well. i find a bigger jump doesnt matter so much on very steep hills .
    Unfortunately not. Just a 'wish list' item. In the meantime there have to be compromises.

    Parker international do custom ratios, I don't think they're cheap though, ooh no just checked they aren't. And they don't do 10 speed shimano either for some reason.
    Saracen Tenet 3 - 2015 - Dead - Replaced with a Hack Frame
    Voodoo Bizango - 2014 - Dead - Hit by a car
    Vitus Sentier VRS - 2017
  • John.TJohn.T Posts: 3,698
    To get back to the OP.
    Ands wrote:
    What are the benefits of going from 9spd to 10 spd? Where do I gain extra gears (do I get an extra sprocket in the middle somewhere or at top/bottom end)?

    I'm thinking of changing my bike this year and had only planned to buy a frame but my OH has said I should upgrade to 10spd as well. I don't know if it's worth the extra expense.

    What bits would I need to change? Is it just the shifters and cassette (already running a 10spd chain)?
    As you are using a 12/25 the extra sprocket would be a 16 in the middle of the cassette. If as you say you do not have a problem with the 'hole' here then it is probably not worth the expense.
    You would need shifters, cassette and a new chain. Unless your current one is very new I would not mate it with a new cassette.
Sign In or Register to comment.