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servicing

trav1502trav1502 Posts: 21
edited December 2009 in Road beginners
just a quck question, how often should you get your bike serviced? i've just had my first six week service on my allez sport triple so it should be okay for a bit, but was just wondering in terms of miles how long each service should be.
cheers

Posts

  • Smokin JoeSmokin Joe Posts: 2,706
    Never.

    When something begins to go out of adjustment I put it right there and then. A bike is not like a car or motorcycle which will die if you neglect to change fluids etc. Keep on top of the few minor things that need a tweak once in the blue moon and it will run perfectly.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    Smokin Joe wrote:
    Never.

    When something begins to go out of adjustment I put it right there and then. A bike is not like a car or motorcycle which will die if you neglect to change fluids etc. Keep on top of the few minor things that need a tweak once in the blue moon and it will run perfectly.

    +1
  • dennisndennisn Posts: 10,601
    dmclite wrote:
    Smokin Joe wrote:
    Never.

    When something begins to go out of adjustment I put it right there and then. A bike is not like a car or motorcycle which will die if you neglect to change fluids etc. Keep on top of the few minor things that need a tweak once in the blue moon and it will run perfectly.

    +1

    +2
  • iain_jiain_j Posts: 1,941
    +3 :P

    IMO the only routine maintenance you need is clean the chain and mechs with a rag and oil them, and check your tyres for bits of glass etc.

    How often depends on how much you ride.
  • pianomanpianoman Posts: 706
    Well that's fine until your rear mech starts jumping gears, or the chain needs replacing.......then it depends on whether you have the tools needed to do the job.

    Certainly you will find that you build knowledge up fairly quickly, and things like changing external parts like tyres and brake blocks should be within the reach of most cyclists. However, don't get down on yourself if you find something like your bottom bracket is grinding or squeaking, as some jobs need very specific tools these days that are either very expensive or are only found in the mechanic's department of your LBS. I do try to do more things myself these days than I used to but if I think something like fitting new brake cables is going to pose a serious risk to my safety due to my lack of advanced mechanical knowledge then I can rely on my LBS to do the job. Also, if you buy from them regularly and you don't get cocky with them, your LBS might even offer you a couple of quid off certain things for loyalty - so it all adds up :D

    (Then again, I do wonder why fiddly things like tightening brake cables seems straightforward yet removing pedals is such a bloody nuisance).............
  • Rich HcpRich Hcp Posts: 1,355
    I tend to take mine in late winter early spring for a check over.

    Cost virtually nowt and he tells me if things are starting to wear...

    Yes, they are things you can do youself, but I'm happy and that's what counts.
    Richard

    Giving it Large
  • it depends entirely on how much you value your time and whether you enjoy it, i personally like tinkering, have just about every tool i could need, and have full access to the workshop at my lbs.

    Between my toolkit and the stuff at my lbs there is nothing i can't do for my bikes, wouldn't have it any other way.
  • Smokin JoeSmokin Joe Posts: 2,706
    PianoMan wrote:
    Well that's fine until your rear mech starts jumping gears, or the chain needs replacing.......then it depends on whether you have the tools needed to do the job.

    Certainly you will find that you build knowledge up fairly quickly, and things like changing external parts like tyres and brake blocks should be within the reach of most cyclists. However, don't get down on yourself if you find something like your bottom bracket is grinding or squeaking, as some jobs need very specific tools these days that are either very expensive or are only found in the mechanic's department of your LBS. I do try to do more things myself these days than I used to but if I think something like fitting new brake cables is going to pose a serious risk to my safety due to my lack of advanced mechanical knowledge then I can rely on my LBS to do the job. Also, if you buy from them regularly and you don't get cocky with them, your LBS might even offer you a couple of quid off certain things for loyalty - so it all adds up :D

    (Then again, I do wonder why fiddly things like tightening brake cables seems straightforward yet removing pedals is such a bloody nuisance).............
    There are no more specialist tools needed now than there ever were, in fact there are fewer since headsets have become servicable with just an Allen key. I am still using some tools I bought 40 years ago, and if you are a long-term cyclist any tool is money well spent.

    Nothing on a bike is beyond anyone who can hold a spanner the right way round and it is well worth learning to maintain you bike yourself, if only because your LBS will be no good to you if your chain breaks mid ride on a Sunday morning.
  • iain_jiain_j Posts: 1,941
    edited December 2009
    PianoMan wrote:
    Well that's fine until your rear mech starts jumping gears, or the chain needs replacing.......

    Indeed. I do those sort of jobs when they come up - but as far as regular, scheduled maintenance, there's very little.

    As for tools, there's not much you can't do with just a set of allen keys and screwdrivers. There's not many parts you need specialist tools for either - I've got a cassette lockring tool (NBT2 - no chain whip required), spoke key and crank puller, everything else the LBS can do.
  • John.TJohn.T Posts: 3,698
    +4.
    All normal servicing requires is a set of allen keys, some bike cleaner and lubricants. BBs are not servicable items and the tools to change them are under a tenner. Likewise a cassette lockring tool and whip. You should already be carrying a chain tool and quicklink.
    You should try to learn how to fix your bike as you may be 50 miles from home when it does go wrong. Regular checks will help prevent this.
  • GavHGavH Posts: 933
    +5 - fix it as it needs it although maybe spend a bit more time on it after winter to get it 100% for summer.
  • NuggsNuggs Posts: 1,804
    +6
  • pianomanpianoman Posts: 706
    Maybe we should move this thread to "Buying Advice" and watch all the suggestions for toolboxes pop up............

    No, what I was really getting at was this:

    It IS the responsibility of any cyclist to get themselves out of trouble when something does go wrong, which is why things should be checked regularly and you should never go out without at least £10 on you in case you need to get a train ride home - don't get stranded in the middle of nowhere with no money to get a train and whinge that "my rear mech broke" or "my chainset fell off" - NO excuse for not having a backup plan.

    What I meant was that not everyone has the skills to build a bike from the frame up. As for what Iain J was saying, well I think everyone should be able to do that, and more.
  • not having the skills is not an excuse for not building a bike up from scratch. Most mechanics will gladly show you how (particularly with nice bikes as they're often few and far between!) in exchange for a pack of biccies alongside whatever is charged for a bike build.
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