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What chain for an old 10-speed?

misterbenmisterben Posts: 193
edited December 2009 in The workshop
After a lengthy hiatus, I'm preparing to get back into cycling on my commute. I've been an old 10-speed (Peugeot Carbolite 103 FWIW) which is, for the most part, in good nick. I did a bit of maintenance at the week - replaced the tyres and gave the whole chainset a good degrease and relube and it seemed to be running pretty freely.

But...

Last night I got on it for my first proper test run, and as soon as I put a reasonable amount of pressure on the pedal, the chain snapped :( I'm thinking that I may as well replace the chain in it's entirety, but I've never had to buy a chain before - any hints on what to buy? I don't want anything fancy - just something that works....
mrBen

"Carpe Aptenodytes"
JediMoose.org

Posts

  • This should do you just fine.
    Neil
    Help I'm Being Oppressed
  • This should do you just fine.

    Brilliant. Thank you.

    Presumably I'm going to need a link remover for that too? Will the basic one here do the job?
    mrBen

    "Carpe Aptenodytes"
    JediMoose.org
  • will3will3 Posts: 2,173
    It would do the job, but it's not what you might call an investment. The park or shimano tools are better quality and will last longer.

    FWIW your 10 speed is actually what we'd call these days 5 speed (confusing I know, but what matters when chosing a chain is how many cogs on the back) so you have a 5 speed/double. This needs 3/32" chain which will usually be labelled as 7/8 speed chain. 9/10/11 speed chain is narrower (necessary to accomodate the extra cogs).
  • will3 wrote:
    It would do the job, but it's not what you might call an investment. The park or shimano tools are better quality and will last longer.

    OK. As long as it does the job this time, and I can manage to make it work until after Christmas, then I can maybe splash out on a better tool ;)
    FWIW your 10 speed is actually what we'd call these days 5 speed (confusing I know, but what matters when chosing a chain is how many cogs on the back) so you have a 5 speed/double. This needs 3/32" chain which will usually be labelled as 7/8 speed chain. 9/10/11 speed chain is narrower (necessary to accomodate the extra cogs).

    Ah - I did wonder about that. Glad I asked here before buying something that wouldn't work :)

    Thanks for the help.
    mrBen

    "Carpe Aptenodytes"
    JediMoose.org
  • iain_jiain_j Posts: 1,941
    You should replace the cassette too then, the cassette and chain wear out together - replace one by itself and they'll wear out even faster.
  • will3will3 Posts: 2,173
    iain_j wrote:
    You should replace the cassette too then, the cassette and chain wear out together - replace one by itself and they'll wear out even faster.

    Except it'll be a freewheel on a 5 speed, and probably a bgger to get off.
  • wgwarburtonwgwarburton Posts: 1,863
    will3 wrote:
    iain_j wrote:
    You should replace the cassette too then, the cassette and chain wear out together - replace one by itself and they'll wear out even faster.

    Except it'll be a freewheel on a 5 speed, and probably a bgger to get off.

    True 'nuff. Worth trying to change only the chain first. If it skips (probably only on one or two of the sprockets!) then five-speed freewheels are still available and your LBS will probably be happy to take the old one off & fit a new one for you. I'd take the wheel in, when they are likely to be quiet, buy a replacement and then ask them nicely to loosen the old one for you. They should have the right extractor in the workshop and it's the work of a moment to break one free with the right tool and a decent bench-vise.

    Cheers,
    W.
  • will3will3 Posts: 2,173
    will3 wrote:
    iain_j wrote:
    You should replace the cassette too then, the cassette and chain wear out together - replace one by itself and they'll wear out even faster.

    Except it'll be a freewheel on a 5 speed, and probably a bgger to get off.

    it's the work of a moment to break one free with the right tool and a decent bench-vise.

    Cheers,
    W.

    You've never tried taking one off a wheel that's been used on a tandem have you :lol:

    that can be the work quite a lot of moments!
  • Thought it'd be worth putting on a quick update. Thanks for all your help.

    I bought the chain recommended (and a link remover) from dotbike. Removed a couple of links to make it the same length as the chain on there and got it fitted with no problems, and it's doing the job great.

    I am sure that at some point I will need to replace the cassette, but if I had enough money to fix everything at once then I'd probably just get a new bike ;) Got a new saddle (Charge Bucket) on order, and the next big thing is probably changing the brakes, but that'll probably end up on another thread ;)

    Thanks again, all.
    mrBen

    "Carpe Aptenodytes"
    JediMoose.org
  • dilemnadilemna Posts: 2,187
    A true Scotsman ...............
    Life is like a roll of toilet paper; long and useful, but always ends at the wrong moment. Anon.
    Think how stupid the average person is.......
    half of them are even more stupid than you first thought.
  • dilemna wrote:
    A true Scotsman ...............

    Actually, I'm English :P
    mrBen

    "Carpe Aptenodytes"
    JediMoose.org
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