The face of a child who has just lost here father!

nicensleazy
nicensleazy Posts: 2,310
edited December 2009 in The bottom bracket
On the way to work today, I couldn't help but see on the newspaper stand the face of that very young child who has just lost here father in afghanistan. It was a picture that really pluked at one's heart strings and humanity. She was attending her fathers funeral. I really don't know, but do you think the press should be showing such pictures. A part of me think yes they should and another part thinks it only adds to the growing discomfort about the whole comflict in the UK. It not only demoralizes the public but it must also demoralize soldiers and other service personal serving out in these far flung places and servicemen and women who are about to be shipped out. The constant pictures of the dead being shipped back are a bleak reminder. I must admit, I was actually touched today at seeing that photo and I'm sure many others were also. :cry:

Comments

  • GiantMike
    GiantMike Posts: 3,139
    The number of soldiers returning with 'life changing injuries' is astonishing! As upsetting as these images are I think it's essential that the public is aware of the sacrifices made by the Armed Forces in their names. While the public may not agree with the war(s), it's their mandate (voting for the Govt) that puts them and keeps them there.

    Every day somebody learns their life will never be the same again. Mother, father, wife, girlfriend, kids.
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    I was looking at it (The picture) today at the top of 'The Sun' that a prisoner had brought in with them and kindly donated to me.

    Very moving and thought provoking.

    Good luck out there lads and lasses...
  • finchy
    finchy Posts: 6,686
    I say that it's a private moment, and should only be made public with the consent of the family, and not show children who aren't old enough to make that decision yet.

    Personally, if it were my Dad who had died, I'd never in a million years want a photo of me at his funeral being splashed all across the front pages just so that newspapers can sell more copies.
  • pastey_boy
    pastey_boy Posts: 2,083
    we should all question why these young people are dying in the first place. afghanistan is a dusty s@it hole of no importance. where was the army when mugabe was running amok ? how many young service men died helping america secure a large quantity of oil in iraq? its all politics pure and simple. i grew up with my father in the forces and i could understand the job being done in northern ireland having lived there at the height of the troubles but when i see lads i went to school with coming home with limbs missing and many dead comrades it makes me mad that this goverment seems fit to play god with these young lives. i bet the parents of these dead service men all have their fingers crossed hoping that afghanistan can be a nice peaceful place. at the end of the day its an age old fact that wars make money for someone . how much propaganda are the british public being fed to justify the whole mess ???? we as a people need to ask for who,s benefit are all these young british lives being sacrificed for ?
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  • owenlars
    owenlars Posts: 719
    Unfortunately death and injury come with the territory when you join the armed forces. Since the end of the Second World War we have had only one year when not a single member of the British armed forces has not died in action. They are always fighting somewhere.

    We should celebrate their bravery, skill and professionalism rather than get mawkish about it.
  • hopper1
    hopper1 Posts: 4,389
    I too, am saddened by the photos. It's a private moment and should remain so.
    The prolific amount of deaths and injuries in Afghanistan is very touching, it seems to get closer and closer to home with each incident.
    Utmost repect to all the servicemen & women over there.

    But, I also see that the minority have posted to argue the pro's & cons of war...again.... This is not in question, here...
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  • Fat Head
    Fat Head Posts: 765
    I saw the same picture too while flicking through a tabloid and also found myself stopping, looking and thinking for some time. So sad. I have a daughter who is 9, the same age as the girl pictured, and it makes you think.

    On a separate issue, like the above poster I don't think such private grief should be captured by a photo.
  • I've had a revelation :idea: Don't want to die? Dont join the army :roll: :arrow:

    Don't get me wrong mucho respect for those chaps and i have a very good friend is in the marines but still.............
  • Chrissz
    Chrissz Posts: 727
    I've had a revelation :idea: Don't want to die? Dont join the army :roll: :arrow:

    Don't get me wrong mucho respect for those chaps and i have a very good friend is in the marines but still.............

    I suppose this is a similar view that drivers have of cyclists - of course it's dangerous out on the roads - if you don't want to die don't cycle!
  • Yes you're right. Exactly the same thing.
  • moray_gub
    moray_gub Posts: 3,328
    owenlars wrote:
    Unfortunately death and injury come with the territory when you join the armed forces. Since the end of the Second World War we have had only one year when not a single member of the British armed forces has not died in action. They are always fighting somewhere.

    We should celebrate their bravery, skill and professionalism rather than get mawkish about it.

    I agree politics apart a soldier/sailor/RAF knows when he signs up what he is signing up for he goes where he is told to go and that there is a possibilty of armed conflict. He knows the risk and that there is a possibilty of being killed in action. When i see parents of dead soldiers complain bitterly about the war in Afghanistan/Iraq and their children shouldnt be fighting it obviously i sympathise with their loss but wonder if this is a sign of the times we live in where parents think their children should join the army and not fight a war the Government deems fit.
    Gasping - but somehow still alive !
  • Moray Gub wrote:
    owenlars wrote:
    Unfortunately death and injury come with the territory when you join the armed forces. Since the end of the Second World War we have had only one year when not a single member of the British armed forces has not died in action. They are always fighting somewhere.

    We should celebrate their bravery, skill and professionalism rather than get mawkish about it.

    I agree politics apart a soldier/sailor/RAF knows when he signs up what he is signing up for he goes where he is told to go and that there is a possibilty of armed conflict. He knows the risk and that there is a possibilty of being killed in action. When i see parents of dead soldiers complain bitterly about the war in Afghanistan/Iraq and their children shouldnt be fighting it obviously i sympathise with their loss but wonder if this is a sign of the times we live in where parents think their children should join the army and not fight a war the Government deems fit.


    This is what i was trying to say but i'm not articulate enough :oops: :arrow: